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  • MCCRS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.3
8th Grade Historical Literacy Unit Plans
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8th Grade Historical Literacy consists of two 43 minute class periods. Writing is one 43 minute block and reading is another. The teacher has picked themes based on social studies standards, and a read-aloud novel based on social studies serves as the mentor text for writing and reading skills. More social studies content is addressed in reading through teaching nonfiction reading skills and discussion.
Standards reflect CCSS ELA, Reading, and Social Studies Standards.

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Jennifer Mortensen
Chelsea Kienitz
Date Added:
04/16/2019
Allusions, Slang, and Literary Analogies
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In this lesson, students analyze the allusions, slang, and literary analogies used in "Raymond's Run" by Toni Cade Bambara. To extend understanding, they will then write their own allusions and analogies.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Date Added:
08/12/2013
Remix
Clusive Lesson Plan: It's a Mystery
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This Lesson Plan was created to use in conjunction with materials in Clusive [https://clusive.cast.org], a free, online learning environment that makes materials flexible and accessible.  The Lesson is designed for students in grades 6-8, and targets ELA standards as well as SEL skills of self-awareness and learner agency. As you use this lesson, students will be guided to recognize, understand, and apply key elements of a mystery story, tools that they can use to build learner agency, self-awareness, and comprehension

Subject:
Education
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Kristin Robinson
Date Added:
08/02/2021
Grade 8 ELA Module 2A
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In this second module, students will continue to develop their ability to closely read text while studying the theme of taking a stand. During the first half of Unit 1, students will read two speeches reflecting examples of real people taking a stand. By reading these speeches they will build background knowledge about the module’s overarching theme, engage in a study of the speaker’s perspective, and analyze the craft of forming an argument. In the second half of Unit 1, students will read Part 1 ofTo Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee and continue to study the theme of taking a stand as it is revealed in the novel. Students will engage in a character study of Atticus by analyzing his actions and words, and what others say about him, to better understand him as a character. This analysis will provide details and evidence for students to use in their end of Unit 2 argument essay. In addition to reading and studying the text, students will view excerpts of the To Kill a Mockingbird film that strongly convey the novel’s themes, and they will analyze how the film remains true to the original text as well as how it veers from the original.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
05/12/2013
Literary Analysis Tool: Character and Theme
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In this resource, students will be asked to use a graphic organizer in order to identify and track the development of theme and character in a literary text. Students will use evidence from the text to construct an evidence based response.

Subject:
Education
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Student Guide
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Erin Dorso
Brendan Johnson
Ambra Bryant
Sarah Reser
Bob Young
Date Added:
02/18/2016
Narrative Writing
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Students will learn and apply techniques to develop and present a personal narrative/memoir. They will take their writing through all stages of the writing process. Their writing will reflect clear understanding of plot, dialogue, transitions, and descriptive details.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Date Added:
08/12/2013
Shakespeare the Player: Illustrating Elizabethan Theatre through A Midsummer Night's Dream
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
Rating
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In this activity, you and your students will explore Elizabethan stage practices as the rustic yet enthusiastic amateur actors from Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. While it's not necessary to teach Shakespeare's biography while studying his plays, sometimes opportunities to explore his world through his own eyes present themselves in his text. Students' new insights into the text will provide them with a deeper appreciation for Shakespeare’s world. This activity will take one or two class periods.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Folger Shakespeare Library
Author:
Caitlin S Griffin and Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger
Date Added:
01/30/2015
Student Activity: What’s in a mystery?
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This handout is a short set of questions for students to use to explore the elements of the mystery genre. When they use thisy, students will be able toList core elements of mystery storiesIdentify how the core elements of a mystery story are manifested in a story they are currently reading.  

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Kristin Robinson
Date Added:
07/30/2021
War of Words lesson 3 Remix
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 "Homeless," by Anna Quindlen, allows the student to understand homelessness as it affects many people on a broader scale. She emphasizes the individuality of homelessness, the fact that they not only lack possessions but have no place to keep them."The First" (also titled "Eviction") is a short poem by Lucille Clifton that provides the opportunity to compare and contrast the approach to the same issue through another genre.Final Assessment: How do Anna Quindlen and Lucille Clifton use language to convince the reader that their arguments have value? (focus on use of specific language, word choice, mood, tone, etc.)

Subject:
Literature
Education
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Jessica Wlotzka
MSDE Admin
Date Added:
08/15/2018