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Making EBC About Literacy Technique: Grade 10: Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This unit develops students‰' abilities to make evidence-based claims about literary technique through activities based on a close reading of Emily Dickinson‰'s ‰"Because I could not stop for Death‰" and Robert Frost‰'s ‰"Home Burial.‰"

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Odell Education
Making Evidence-Based Claims: President Ronald Reagan's First Inaugural Address and Secretary Hillary Clinton's 2011 APEC Address
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This unit develops students' abilities to make evidence-based claims through activities based on a close reading of President Ronald Reagan's First Inaugural Address and Secretary Hillary Clinton's 2011 APEC Address.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Odell Education
CC Tasks: On Behalf of Others (Grades 11-12)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Task Description: This task asks students to write an essay in which they present and defend their beliefs about doing work "on behalf of others" based on the texts they have explored throughout the unit. This packet contains a curriculum-embedded CCLS aligned task and instructional supports. The task is embedded in a 2-3 week unit on documentary work that focuses on creating records or accounts of events, people, and places that might otherwise go unnoticed.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
New York City Department of Education
Writing Activities
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

FreeReading is an open source instructional program that helps educators teach early literacy. Because it is open source, it represents the collective wisdom of a wide community of teachers and researchers. FreeReading contains Writing Activities, a page of activities to address important writing skills and strategies.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Wireless Generation
Provider Set:
FreeReading
Author:
Holt Laurence et al
Literary Analysis Through Interactive Stations
Rating

12th Grade ELA Teacher Daniel Wallace teaches a lesson on how a single idea in a text develops over time as the story unfolds. He explains that this is a concept with which students often struggle so he uses Interactive Stations to provide scaffolding. Working in small groups, students rotate through interactive stations such as the Wall of Silence in which they have a Ňwritten conversationÓ and the Power Tableau in which they experience a given idea both physically and emotionally.Each station takes approximately 5 minutes and provides a balance of written, verbal, physical, and emotional activities.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Wolves: Comprehending Informational Texts
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This integrated plan uses non-fiction text and wolves to motivate students with language arts and science. Students will read a nonfiction text and use metacognitive skills of guided reading and KWHL chart to monitor comprehension and extend vocabulary.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Amy Vance
Common Core Curriculum: Kindergarten ELA: Listening and Learning Strand
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The goal of the Listening and Learning Strand is for students to acquire language competence through listening, specifically building a rich vocabulary, and broad knowledge in history and science by being exposed to carefully selected, sequenced, and coherent read_alouds. The 9 units (or domains) provide lessons (including images and texts), as well as instructional objectives, core vocabulary, and assessment materials. The domain topics include: Nursery Rhymes and Fables; Five Senses; Stories; Plants; Farms; Kings and Queens; Seasons and Weather; Colonial Towns; and Taking Care of the Earth.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Ecology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Socratic Seminar: Supporting Claims and Counterclaims
Rating

High school students work in teams to develop claims and anticipate counter-claims given topics about governmental control and oppression related to their reading of Persepolis.Prior to the debate, students discuss their claims and evidence supporting these claims within their teams and also anticipate counter-claims. Each team member takes notes and prepares to either debate for their team or document interesting arguments that occur during the spoken debate. Ensuring participation by all students during this time is critical.The debate begins with one representative from each team who presents their argument to the group. Teams are required to tap out representatives at least once and points are awarded for such things as presenting unique ideas, participation by all group members, and using evidence to support claims. After the debate, students return to their teams to reflect on the process and the content of the seminar.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Reading Closely: We Had to Learn English
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This unit develops students' abilities to read closely for textual details and compare authors' perspectives through an examination of a series of texts about immigration through Ellis Island. Authors of the short readings include Jacob Riis, Edward Steiner, H. G. Wells, Mary Antin, Marie Ganz, Nat Ferber, Frederick Douglass, Emma Lazarus, and Claude McKay.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Odell Education
Making EBC About Literacy Technique: Grade 11: Louise Erdrich, Tim O'Brien
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This unit develops students‰' abilities to make evidence-based claims about literary technique through activities based on a close reading of Louise Erdrich's "The Red Convertible" and Tim O'Brien's "On the Rainy River."

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Odell Education
Making Evidence-Based Claims: Steve Jobs' 2005 Stanford University Commencement Address
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This unit develops students' abilities to make evidence-based claims through activities based on a close reading of the Commencement Address Steve Jobs delivered at Stanford University on June, 2005.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Odell Education
Reading Like a Historian, Unit 12: Cold War Culture/Civil Rights
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this unit, students explore social, cultural, and political events that helped define America in the decades following the Second World War. The lesson on the Civil Rights movement revolves around the question: Why did the Montgomery Bus Boycott succeed? In another, students compare speeches by JFK and John Lewis regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In the Women in the 1950s lesson plan, students use secondary sources and popular images to explore whether "the happy housewife" was reality or perception. Finally, students will encounter opposing views on whether the Great Society was successful, and what led many Americans came to oppose the Vietnam War.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Stanford History Education Group
Provider Set:
Reading Like a Historian
Grade 6 ELA Module 2A
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

What are “rules to live by”? How do people formulate and use “rules” to improve their lives? How do people communicate these “rules” to others? In this module, students consider these questions as they read the novel Bud, Not Buddy, Steve Jobs’ 2005 commencement address at Stanford University, President Barack Obama’s Back-to-School Speech, “If” by Rudyard Kipling, and informational research texts. At the start of Unit 1, students launch their study of Bud, Not Buddy, establishing a set of routines for thinking, writing, and talking about Bud’s rules to live by. They read the novel closely for its figurative language and word choice, analyzing how these affect the tone and meaning of the text. In the second half of the unit, students engage in a close reading of the Steve Jobs speech, focusing on how Jobs develops his ideas at the paragraph, sentence, and word level. Students use details from the speech to develop claims about a larger theme. During Unit 2, students continue to explore the theme of “rules to live by” in the novel as well as through close reading of the poem “If” by Rudyard Kipling. Students analyze how the structure of a poem contributes to its meaning and theme. In a mid-unit assessment, students compare and contrast how Bud, Not Buddy and “If” address a similar theme. Unit 2 culminates with students writing a literary argument essay in which they establish a claim about how Bud uses his “rules”: to survive or to thrive. Students substantiate their claim using specific text-based evidence including relevant details and direct quotations from the novel. In Unit 3, students shift their focus to their own rules to live by and conduct a short research project. Students work in expert groups (research teams) to use multiple informational sources to research that topic. As a final performance task, students use their research to write an essay to inform about one important “rule to live by” supported with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, and examples.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Making EBC About Literacy Technique: Grade 12: Raymond Carver
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This unit develops students‰' abilities to make evidence-based claims about literary technique through activities based on a close reading of Raymond Carver‰'s ‰"What We Talk About When We Talk About Love.‰"

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Odell Education
CC Tasks: John Muir - Conservationist on the Quarter (Grade 4)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Task Description: Students write an essay using key details from the text to explain why John Muir devoted his life to conservation efforts and describe the effect that his work had on preserving the beauty of nature. This task is embedded in a 2-3 week unit that uses the topic of human impact on environment as a means to teach students how to analyze and navigate informational texts. Students will write an essay at the end of the unit demonstrating their mastery of the content and their ability to make inferences within a specific text.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
New York City Department of Education
Making Evidence-Based Claims: Cesar Chavez's 1984 California Commonwealth Club Address (Grade 7)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This unit develops students' abilities to make evidence-based claims through activities based on a close reading of Cesar Chavez's 1984 California Commonwealth Club Address.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Odell Education
Preparing For Close Reading With Students
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This 30 minute video features a discussion between NYS Commissioner of Education John B. King Jr., David Coleman (contributing author to the Common Core) and Kate Gerson (a Sr. Fellow with the Regents Research Fund) on the first 20 paragraphs of Martin Luther King Jr.‰'s ‰"Letter from Birmingham Jail.‰" This conversation represents one of the ways a group of educators might prepare for close reading of text with students. This behind-the-scenes discourse represents the kind of dialogue teachers can have as they build their own fluency and familiarity with a text before diving into it with students. After watching this video, educators might ask themselves: Why are conversations like these important? What role can adult discussions of text play in teacher prep? Participants might also continue the conversation King, Coleman, and Gerson are having by picking up where they left off and engaging deeply around paragraphs 21-30. What happens next in the text? What is King ‰"up to‰" for those paragraphs?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Common Core Curriculum Grade 4 Module 1 Overview: Becoming a Close Reader and Writing to Learn - Native Americans in New York
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This module ensures that students read, write, listen and speak to learn the history and contributions of Native Americans in New York State, particularly the Iroquois Confederacy. It focuses on reading and listening to primary and secondary sources to gather specific details and determine central ideas, and to reinforce reading fluency and paragraph writing. Students will read literature to develop an understanding of setting, characterization and theme, and informational writing.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
English Language Arts 11
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

English III, American Literature, explores the literature of America from the narratives of the early colonists to the foundational documents of our forefathers, and the literature of our modern times. In English III, you will gain a firm grasp of the various literary periods throughout American history as well as the ability to analyze different genres and styles of notable American authors. As you progress through the course, you will gain an appreciation for American literature and an understanding of how the literature of the day acted as a reflection of the historical period from which it evolved. This course will also give you the opportunity to hone your own writing skills as you identify the characteristics of effective writing for a variety of different purposes and audiences.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Reading
Unit of Study
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Grade 7 ELA Module 1
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this 8 eight-week module, students explore the experiences of people of Southern Sudan during and after the Second Sudanese Civil War. They build proficiency in using textual evidence to support ideas in their writing, both in shorter responses and in an extended essay. In Unit 1, students begin the novel A Long Walk to Water (720L) by Linda Sue Park. Students will read closely to practice citing evidence and drawing inferences from this compelling text as they begin to analyze and contrast the points of view of the two central characters, Salva and Nya. They also will read informational text to gather evidence on the perspectives of the Dinka and Nuer tribes of Southern Sudan. In Unit 2, students will read the remainder of the novel, focusing on the commonalities between Salva and Nya in relation to the novel’s theme: how individuals survive in challenging environments. (The main characters’ journeys are fraught with challenges imposed by the environment, including the lack of safe drinking water, threats posed by animals, and the constant scarcity of food. They are also challenged by political and social environments.). As in Unit 1, students will read this literature closely alongside complex informational texts (focusing on background on Sudan and factual accounts of the experiences of refugees from the Second Sudanese Civil War). Unit 2 culminates with a literary analysis essay about the theme of survival. Unit 3 brings students back to a deep exploration of character and point of view: students will combine their research about Sudan with specific quotes from A Long Walk to Water as they craft a two-voice poem, comparing and contrasting the points of view of the two main characters, Salva and Nya,. The two-voice poem gives students an opportunity to use both their analysis of the characters and theme in the novel and their research about the experiences of the people of Southern Sudan during the Second Sudanese Civil War.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY