Search Results (86)

View
Selected filters:
  • Women
12d. "Republican Motherhood"
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Women's role in society was altered by the American Revolution. Women who ran households in the absence of men became more assertive. Abigail Adams, wife of John, became an early advocate of women's rights when she prompted her husband to "Remember the Ladies" when drawing up a new government.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
39c. Women in the Gilded Age
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The idea was to create a maternal commonwealth. Upper-middle-class women of the late 19th century were not content with the cult of domesticity of the early 1800s. Many had become college educated and yearned to put their knowledge and skills to work for the public good.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
3f. Women of Ancient Egypt
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Egyptian women could have their own businesses, own and sell property, and serve as witnesses in court cases. Unlike most women in the Middle East, they were even permitted to be in the company of men. They could escape bad marriages by divorcing and remarrying. And women were entitled to one third of the property their husbands owned. The political and economic rights Egyptian women enjoyed made them the most liberated females of their time.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
Date Added:
12/05/2014
46d. Flappers
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The battle for suffrage was finally over. After a 72-year struggle, women had won the precious right to vote. The generations of suffragists that had fought for so long proudly entered the political world. Carrie Chapman Catt carried the struggle into voting awareness with the founding of the League of Women Voters. Alice Paul vowed to fight until an Equal Rights Amendment was added to the Constitution. Margaret Sanger declared that female independence could be accomplished only with proper birth control methods. To their dismay, the daughters of this generation seemed uninterested in these grand causes. As the 1920s roared along, many young women of the age wanted to have fun.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
Analyzing Character Development in Three Short Stories About Women
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students read three short stories about women; discuss the development of female characters, gender differences, and society' s expectations; and write scripts in which the characters discuss their similarities and differences.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
08/23/2013
Arab Women Writers
Rating

This blog is an initiative to celebrate and recognize Arab women writers, promote awareness of the breadth of their contributions to Arab and world culture, and create a focal point for information related to Arab women writers and their work. Information on books, generations of authors, a suggested reading list, references, upcoming events, and more is all available via the website. Books discussed have all been translated into English.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Literature
World Cultures
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
ArabWomenWriters
Date Added:
10/14/2013
ArtsEdge Media Collection: Women in the Arts
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

From providing historical inspiration to preserving cultural traditions to pushing the boundaries of creativity, explore the contributions women have made and continue to make to the arts.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Kennedy Center ARTSEDGE
Provider Set:
ARTSEDGE
Date Added:
02/24/2011
CFR Interactive Report: Women's Participation in Peace Processes
Rating

The Council on Foreign Relation's (CFR) Women and Foreign Policy program analyzes how elevating the status of women and girls advances U.S. foreign policy objectives. The CFR Interactive Report "Women's Participation in Peace Processes" provides compelling evidence about the value of women’s contributions to peace processes around the world.

Subject:
World History
Cultural Geography
Political Science
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Assessment
Case Study
Interactive
Module
Reading
Author:
Council on Foreign Relations
Date Added:
12/21/2017
Citizenship and Pluralism, Fall 2003
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This course will serve as both an introduction to contemporary political philosophy and a way to explore issues of pluralism and multiculturalism. Racial and ethnic groups, national minorities, aboriginals, women, sexual minorities, and other groups have organized to highlight injustice and demand recognition and accommodation on the basis of their differences. In practice, democratic states have granted a variety of group-differentiated rights, such as exemptions from generally applicable laws, special representation rights, language rights, or limited self-government rights, to different types of groups. This course will examine how different theories of citizenship address the challenges raised by different forms of pluralism. We will focus in particular on the following questions: - Does justice require granting group-differentiated rights? - Do group-differentiated rights conflict with liberal and democratic commitments to equality and justice for all citizens? - What, if anything, can hold a multi-religious, multicultural society together? Why should the citizens of such a society want to hold together?

Subject:
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Song, Sarah
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Colonial Latin and South America
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the history of Latin and South America from the year in which European explorers first discovered and began to colonize the region to the early 19th century, when many Latin and South American colonies declared their independence from European rule. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout Latin and South America during this 400-year period. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the interaction between native peoples and European settlers created diverse and complex colonial societies throughout Latin and South America, and why the colonies of the region eventually declared their independence from European political control. Upon successful completion of this course, student will be able to: Think critically about the history of Latin and South America from the pre-colonial period though the beginning of the 19th century; Compare and contrast the political, economic, and social practices of the peoples of Iberia, Africa, and the Americas in the pre-colonial period; Analyze the political, social, and military interactions between Iberian explorers and conquerors and the indigenous peoples of the Americas in the 15th and 16th centuries; Identify how Spanish colonists settled Latin and South America in the 16th century and analyze the role played by imperial and religious institutions in colonization efforts; Assess the role of European Mercantile policies in the formation of colonial economies and trade networks; Analyze the structure of Spanish and Portuguese colonial societies and assess the role of women, indigenous peoples, and Afro-Latinos in these societies; Students will be able to assess the status of Latin and South American colonies in the Spanish and Portuguese Empires of the 17th and 18th centuries and identity how European conflicts affected political and economic life in the colonies; Identify how the Napoleonic Wars of the early 19th century led to the rise of independence movements in the colonies of Latin and South America; Assess how political revolutions and wars for independence throughout Latin and South America ended European colonial control of the region, and compare and contrast the consequences of these revolutions for ethnic European and indigenous populations; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the pre-colonial period though the beginning of the 19th century using historical research methods. (History 221)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Contemporary Life In Vietnam
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Photographs and text describe contemporary life in Vietnam and the impact of economic and social reforms since the 1980s.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Articles & More
Date Added:
08/17/1971
Conversations with History: Justice in Rwanda and the Rights of Women, with Alice Karekezi
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this edition, lawyer and human rights activist Alice Karekezi joins UC Berkeley's Harry Kreisler to reflect on the plight of women in Rwanda and the importance of making their struggle part of the human rights agenda. (60 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
U.C. Berkeley
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
10/06/2003
Cross-Cultural Investigations: Technology and Development, Fall 2012
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This course enhances cross-cultural understanding through the discussion of practical, ethical, and epistemological issues in conducting social science and applied research in foreign countries or unfamiliar communities. It includes a research practicum to help students develop interviewing, participant-observation, and other qualitative research skills, as well as critical discussion of case studies. The course is open to all interested students, but intended particularly for those planning to undertake exploratory research or applied work abroad. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.

Subject:
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Heather Paxson
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Depicting Women and Class in a Global Society (Beginning Level)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Students will compare a painting depicting hatmakers at work to a portrait of a noblewoman of leisure. Next, pupils will write narratives from the perspectives of the women depicted in the paintings and then create a paper hat.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/27/2013
Depicting Women and Class in a Global Society (Intermediate Level)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Students will discuss the evolution of women's work from the mid-19th century to the present day and then create an artwork depicting women in contemporary times.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/27/2013
The Economic History of Work and Family, Spring 2005
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Explores the changing map of the public and the private in pre-industrial and modern societies and examines how that map affected men's and women's production and consumption of goods and leisure. The reproductive strategies of women, either in conjunction with or in opposition to their families, is another major theme. How did an ideal of the "domestic" arise in the early modern west, and to what extent did it limit the economic position of women? How has it been challenged, and with what success, in the post-industrial period? Focuses on western Europe since the Middle Ages and on the United States, but some attention to how these issues have played themselves out in non-Western cultures. This course will explore the relation of women and men in both pre-industrial and modern societies to the changing map of public and private (household) work spaces, examining how that map affected their opportunities for both productive activity and the consumption of goods and leisure. The reproductive strategies of women, either in conjunction with or in opposition to their families, will be the third major theme of the course. We will consider how a place and an ideal of the "domestic" arose in the early modern west, to what extent it was effective in limiting the economic position of women, and how it has been challenged, and with what success, in the post-industrial period. Finally, we will consider some of the policy implications for contemporary societies as they respond to changes in the composition of the paid work force, as well as to radical changes in their national demographic profiles. Although most of the material for the course will focus on western Europe since the Middle Ages and on the United States, we will also consider how these issues have played themselves out in non-western cultures.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
McCants, Anne Elizabeth Conger
Date Added:
01/01/2005