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  • White Dwarfs
Introduction to Astronomy, Spring 2006
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This course includes Quantitative introduction to physics of the solar system, stars, ...

This course includes Quantitative introduction to physics of the solar system, stars, interstellar medium, the Galaxy, and Universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models. Topics: planets, planet formation; stars, the Sun, "normal" stars, star formation; stellar evolution, supernovae, compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), plusars, binary X-ray sources; star clusters, globular and open clusters; interstellar medium, gas, dust, magnetic fields, cosmic rays; distance ladder; galaxies, normal and active galaxies, jets; gravitational lensing; large scaling structure; Newtonian cosmology, dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe; cosmic microwave background radiation; big-bang nucleosynthesis. No prior knowledge of astronomy necessary. Not usable as a restricted elective by physics majors.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Assessments
Full Course
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Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Rappaport, Saul
One on One with the Sun
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This humorous OLogy article introduces kids to the Sun. The big star ...

This humorous OLogy article introduces kids to the Sun. The big star answers 15 questions, including: Your agent told me that you're the biggest star in the universe. Is that true? I know you star types tend to be touchy about age, but how old are you? Actually, I'm curious to know how stars begin. What's your story? Let's turn to a delicate subject. How do stars die? In Hollywood, I meet a lot of people filled with hot air. What gases are inside you?

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Readings
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History