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  • United Nations
52b. The United Nations
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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Despite the ideological animosity spawned by the Cold War, a new spirit of globalism was born after WWII. It was based, in part, on the widespread recognition of the failures of isolationism. The incarnation of this global sprit came to life with the establishment of the United Nations in 1945 with its headquarters in New York City.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
Conversations with History: Chasing the Flame
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Harvard Professor Samantha Power for a discussion of her new book, "Chasing the Flame: Sergio Vieira de Mello and the Fight to Save the World." The conversation focuses on the lessons of De Mello's life for understanding the challenges confronting world order in the 21st century. (56 minutes)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
U.C. Berkeley
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
05/05/2007
Conversations with History: Reflections on a Life in War and Peace, with Sir Brian Urquhart
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Former United Nations secretary General Sir Brian Urquhart in conversation with UC Berkeley's Harry Kreisler looks back on his distinguished career as a soldier, diplomat, and international statesman. (57 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
U.C. Berkeley
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
03/20/2000
Educational Outreach Plan, UN Action, K-12
Rating

 8th Grade Literacy Tutorial                                                                               Visual and Information Literacy: What roles do community and media play in times of crisis

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Marissa Vassari
Girls Speak Out
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Today, over 115 million children have never set foot inside a school. The fact is that for children living in developing countries, the dream of a first day of school is yet to be realized. The daily realities of poverty, political instability, regional conflict, geography, and cultural or traditional values all play a role to varying degrees -- and the issue of gender disparity makes this fact even more staggering. Full and equal access to education (Article 26) as outlined in the 'Universal Declaration of Human Rights' and 'The Convention on the Rights of the Child' (Articles 2,3,28, and 29), has clearly been out of the reach of poor children -- and even more so in the case of girls. Nearly two-thirds of children who are denied a primary education are girls. In the least developed countries, nearly twice as many adult women than men are illiterate. (Source: UNFPA http://www.unfpa.org/icpd/10/icpd_ed.htm) If you happen to be a female, you are less likely to have access to a quality primary education and beyond -- contributing to the feminization of global poverty. Yet, there is hope despite this current state of affairs. 189 nations have pledged to meet 8 major Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by 2015. In doing so, nations hope to improve the social and economic development of all peoples. Included in these goals are those that address education and gender disparity: MDG 2: Achieve universal and primary education. MDG 3: Promote gender equality and empower women. Through the activities outlined in this lesson, students will become familiar with the current barriers standing in the way of educational opportunity -- especially for girls. They will watch clips from the WIDE ANGLE film 'Time for School' (2003) to understand the sense of urgency surrounding this issue, the potential benefits that can result from educating girls, and the ways that local communities are trying to address these problems. Note: This lesson focuses on MDG 2 and MDG 3. An introduction to the overall goals of the Millennium Project should be presented prior to this particular lesson.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Thirteen/WNET New York
Provider Set:
WIDE ANGLE: Window into Global History
Author:
Yolanda Betances
Date Added:
05/19/2006
Global Economic Governance Programme Series
Rating

The Global Economic Governance Programme was established at University College in 2003 to foster research and debate into how global markets and institutions can better serve the needs of people in developing countries. The Programme is directly linked to Oxford UniversityŐs Department of Politics and International Relations and Centre for International Studies. It serves as an interdisciplinary umbrella within Oxford drawing together members of the Departments of Economics, Law and Development Studies working on these issues and linking them to an international research network.

Subject:
Finance
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Andres Velasco
Anke Hoeffler
Cameron Hepburn
Helen Clark
John Mitchell
Laurence Whitehead
Monica Duffy Toft
Ngaire Woods
Paul Sherlock
Poul Nyrup Rasmussen
Richard Caplan
Sir David King
Date Added:
11/05/2009
Global Nomads Group: Climate Change Webcast Curriculum (One-Week Lesson Plan)
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

How does global warming affect humans? The Climate Change Webcast explores the causes and effects of climate change as students work together to create an international climate change proposal to present at the United Nations Climate Summit.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Global Nomads Group (GNG)
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Great Power Military Intervention, Fall 2013
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This course examines systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions, and candidate military interventions, into civil wars from the 1990s to the present. These civil wars did not easily fit into the traditional category of vital interest. These interventions may therefore tell us something about broad trends in international politics including the nature of unipolarity, the erosion of sovereignty, the security implications of globalization, and the nature of modern western military power.

Subject:
Journalism
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Peterson, Roger
Posen, Barry
Date Added:
01/01/2013
HS American Gov. EBAS Lesson Seed: The United States’ Role in the International Community
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Lesson seeds are ideas for the standards that can be used to build a lesson.  Lesson seeds are not meant to be all-inclusive, nor are they substitutes for instruction.  This lesson seed provides a compelling question and a bank of sources to use to drive an inquiry based lesson or a potential Evidence Based Argument Set (EBAS).  When developing lessons from these seeds, teachers must consider the needs of all learners.  Once you have built your lesson from the lesson seed, teachers are encouraged to post the lesson that has emerged from this lesson seed and share with others. Compelling question: Does United States participation in the United Nations help it achieve its foreign policy goals? EL Modification: highlight important vocabulary, add images to improve text comprenesion; consider adapting content, process and/or product based on Can Do WIDA DescriptorsImage source: "United Nations HQ" by Dendodge from Wikimedia.org

Subject:
Education
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Robby May
International Law
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this course, the student will learn fundamental principles of international law and examine the historical development of these laws. The first half will define international law, identify its foundations, and review its historical development. The student will examine one of the most central debates of international law: how these laws are enforced -- or, in many cases, not enforced. The inherent conflicts of international law with national sovereignty, domestic politics, and balance of power will also be reviewed. This course will explore specific topics within international law, such as the laws of war, the laws of the sea, international human rights, international crimes, environmental law, protection of intellectual property, and international trade. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain how international law has developed over time; discuss the difficulties in enforcement of international law; identify issues that international law seeks to resolve; demonstrate an understanding of how power and politics influence the formation, application, and enforcement of international law; assess the effectiveness of international law in resolving transnational disputes. (Political Science 412)

Subject:
Law
General Law
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
International Organizations
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course provides a basic understanding of two core concepts in International Relations and, more generally, Political Science: international governance and international government. It will serve as the basis for further studies in the International Relations field within the Political Science major; it also serves as a companion course or ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĄ_alter-egoĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺÎĺ for the International Law course. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: define and correctly use the core vocabulary and concepts relevant for international organizations and global governance; discuss various theories of international governance as they pertain to regional and global contexts; identify and describe the major intergovernmental, non-governmental and transnational organizations that are participants in global relations; describe and discuss international regimes distinct from international organizations; compare and contrast various IGOs, NGOs and transnational organizations with respect to their structures, functions and activities; discuss the United NationsĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_ effectiveness with respect to addressing global issues such as armed conflict, human rights and environmental crises; evaluate the conceptual material in light of global realities through the exploration of case studies. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Political Science 312)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/16/2012
International Politics and Climate Change, Fall 2007
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This course examines the interconnections of international politics and climate change. Beginning with an analysis of the strategic and environmental legacies of the 20th Century, it explores the politicization of the natural environment, the role of science in this process, and the gradual shifts in political concerns to incorporate "nature". Two general thrusts of climate-politics connections are pursued, namely those related to (a) conflict - focusing on threats to security due to environmental dislocations and (b) cooperation - focusing on the politics of international treaties that have contributed to emergent processes for global accord in response to evidence of climate change. The course concludes by addressing the question of: "What Next?

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Choucri, Nazli
Date Added:
01/01/2007
In the Mountains of New Mexico
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

At age twenty-seven, physicist Philip Morrison joined the Manhattan Project, the code name given to the U.S. government's covert effort at Los Alamos to develop the first nuclear weapon. The Manhattan Project was also the most expensive single program ever financed by public funds. In this video segment, Morrison describes the charismatic leadership of his mentor, J. Robert Oppenheimer, and the urgency of their mission to manufacture a weapon 'which if we didn't make first would lead to the loss of the war." In the interview Morrison conducted for War and Peace in the Nuclear Age: 'Dawn,' he describes the remote, inaccessible setting of the laboratory that operated in extreme secrecy. It was this physical isolation, he maintains, that allowed scientists extraordinary freedom to exchange ideas with fellow physicists. Morrison also reflects on his wartime fears. Germany had many of the greatest minds in physics and engineering, which created tremendous anxiety among Allied scientists that it would win the atomic race and the war, and Morrison recalls the elaborate schemes he devised to determine that country's atomic progress. At the time that he was helping assemble the world's first atomic bomb, Morrison believed that nuclear weapons 'could be made part of the construction of the peace.' A month after the war, he toured Hiroshima, and for several years thereafter he testified, became a public spokesman, and lobbied for international nuclear cooperation. After leaving Los Alamos, Morrison returned to academia. For the rest of his life he was a forceful voice against nuclear weapons.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
WGBH Open Vault
Date Added:
02/26/1986
Introducing Africa
Rating

Introducing Africa is comprised of two lessons and is designed to raise studentsĚ_Ě_´ awareness about stereotypes of Africa; teach them information about the history, geography, economics and cultures of Africa; and to give them an appreciation for the diversity of the African continent. This kit will teach students to identify important details, make logical inferences, and draw informed conclusions from visual documents including photographs and money. The lesson was designed for third grade but can be used with older students.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Author:
Chris Sperry
Date Added:
04/23/2013
LANGUAGE, THOUGHT, and REALITY (1956 edition)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

A unique perspective on the confluence of the three basic conceptual frameworks in human experience. Contains several studies, with data, of remarkable world views of disparate cultures based on their specific cultures language. The premise is that how people experience the world, then think about it, then create a language around it, alters their perception of the world in very fundamental ways. The radical notion is that thought and language, creates the circumstances of, and contribute to significantly different realities for different peoples.

The internalization and realization of this concept is significant and can possibly radically alter and change how different cultures assess their ability to, at the most basic levels, understand other cultures realities.

Subject:
World Cultures
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Social Science
Anthropology
Cultural Geography
Social Work
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson
Primary Source
Reading
Textbook
Author:
Benjamin Lee Whorf
Openlibrary Org
Date Added:
09/06/2018