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The Secretary of War Presenting A Stand of Colours To The 1st Regiment of Republican Bloodhounds
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A bitter vilification of the Van Buren administration's use of bloodhounds to ...

A bitter vilification of the Van Buren administration's use of bloodhounds to hunt fugitive Indians during the Second Seminole War in Florida. The artist condemns the racism and inhumanity of the measure, as well as the role of editor Francis Preston Blair as apologist for the administration. The War Department under Secretary Joel Poinsett was accused of ineptness and cruelty in its conduct of the war--a costly and protracted campaign to subjugate and remove the Seminole Indians from tribal lands in Florida. Public and congressional indignation was stirred in February and March 1840 when the Cuban bloodhounds were first introduced. (The cartoon may date from this time or from as early as 1838 when the idea was first suggested to commanding general Zachary Taylor by Poinsett.) The use of dogs particularly enraged abolitionists, who believed that the animals were really intended for hunting runaway slaves. In the cartoon Poinsett presents a flag that bears the image of an Indian's head carried by a dog. Francis Preston Blair, on his knees, shows the troop of hounds a map of Florida. Blair: "I take pleasure in pointing out to you, my "brethren-"in-arms the seat of a war, the honour of terminating which our master has put in the hands of "our" race. I have no doubt you will all prove like myself--good "collar" men in the cause." Blair's use of the term "collar men" evokes the old colloquialism "collar presses" as a reference to newspapers friendly to the Democratic administration. Poinsett says: "Fellow citizens & soldiers! In presenting this standard to the 1st Regiment of Bloodhounds, I congratulate you on your promotion, from the base & inglorious pursuit of animals, in an uncivilized region like Cuba, to the noble task of hunting "men" in our Christian country! our administration has been reproached for the expense of the Florida war, so we have determined now to prosecute it, in a way that's "dog cheap!" Hence in your "huge paws!" we put the charge of bringing it to a close. Be fleet of foot and keen of nose, or the Indians will escape in "spite" of your "teeth! Dear Blair" here, shows you a map of Florida the theatre of your future deeds. Look to him as the trumpeter of your fame, who will emblazon your acts, as far as the 'Globe' extends, He feels great interest in all his Kith & Kin,' and will therefore transmit your heroism, in "dog"grel verse to remotest posterity!"|Printed & pub: by H.R. Robinson, no. 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y. & Pennsa Avenue Washington D.C.|Signed: Bow Wow-Wow (probably Napoleon Sarony).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 62.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-5.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Tobacco Bag Stringing Activity 1
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Remix and Share
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In this activity, students will read background information on tobacco bag stringing, ...

In this activity, students will read background information on tobacco bag stringing, and will be asked to analyze reports, worker profiles, and letters from the Tobacco Bag Stringing collection. They will respond by composing their own letter to President Roosevelt, supporting or opposing an amendment to the Fair Labor Standards act.

The student project will demonstrate mastery of a variety of objectives, including creative writing, historical appreciation and criticism, recognition of bias, and incorporation of text and illustration reflecting primary source research.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
UNC University Library
Provider Set:
Stories of the American South
The Grand National Fight 2 Against 1 Fought On The 6th of Nov. 1856 For One Hundred Thousand Dollars
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The familiar metaphor of the presidential contest as a boxing match is ...

The familiar metaphor of the presidential contest as a boxing match is invoked once again. (For an earlier example see "Set to Between the Champion Old Tip and the Swell Dutchman of Kinderhook," no. 1836-12.) The scene is set in an open field, roped off behind to make a ring. Republican candidate Fremont (right) squares off against Democrat James Buchanan (left), after the latter has felled American party nominee Millard Fillmore. Buchanan warns Fremont, "Look out now Young Mariposa for that hair on your face I will put in the "Right" when you least expect it!" Fremont replies, "Come to time, Old Buck, I think I can lick a Democrat as old again as you are!" Fremont steps over the fallen Fillmore, who says, "You see, Fremont, I'm down! There must be a good many drops of 'Democrtic Blood' in that arm of Old Buck's to strike such a stunning blow!" Buchanan is seconded by an Irishman (far left) who comments, "By Jabbers but Old Bucky knocks 'em." Fremont is supported by a Bowery type (crouching at far right) who urges him, "Go in wooly Hoss don't be afeard." The print was probably issued in summer 1856 or later in the election campaign, after Fillmore's prospects for victory had dimmed. |Probably drawn by John L. Magee.|Published by John Childs, 84 So. 3rd St. Phila.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 116.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1856-16.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Chevy Chase Or The Bank Runner (how Burrows Ran On The 1st of Novr. & S_L Followed, and How Burrows Distanced Him & Almost Escaped A Whipping)
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Entered according to the Act of Congress by William Kelly, in the ...

Entered according to the Act of Congress by William Kelly, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of the City of New York.|Inscribed in ink above image: Deposited Novr. 6th 1832.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
"I Knew Him, Horatio; A Fellow of Infinite Jest . . . Where Be Your Gibes Now?--"Hamlet, Act Iv, Scene 1"
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McClellan, in the character of Hamlet stands near an open grave holding ...

McClellan, in the character of Hamlet stands near an open grave holding the head of Abraham Lincoln. He soliloquizes, "I knew him, Horatio: A fellow of infinite jest . . . Where be your gibes now?" The cartoon evidently appeared following publication in the "New York World" of a scandalous but fabricated account of callous levity displayed by Lincoln while touring the battlefield at Antietam. (See also "The Commander-in-Chief conciliating the Soldier's Votes," no. 1864-31.) McClellan's lines here come from "Hamlet," act 4, scene 1, which takes place in a graveyard, where a gravedigger throws up the skull of Yorick, the king's jester. Hamlet picks up the skull and meditates on the nature of life. At left are the words, "Chicago Nominee," referring to McClellan. At right an Irish gravedigger pauses in his work. Horatio (far right) is New York governor and prominent Peace Democrat Horatio Seymour. The White House is visible in the distance.|Probably published by Thomas W. Strong, N.Y.|Signed: Howard Del [i.e. J.H. Howard].|Title appears as it is written on the item.|"The Lincoln Image," p. 133.|Lorant, p. 265.|Weitenkampf, p. 146.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1864-33.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Progress of Reform!!! No. 1
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A scene in New York, outside the gates of City Hall Park. ...

A scene in New York, outside the gates of City Hall Park. Two well-dressed men with top hats overturn the table of two apple-women. One of the men (from all appearances a Loco Foco radical Democrat) shouts at the women, "What right have you to live? Come, clear out!" The other man topples a table from which fall apples, cigars, and what looks like a cider churn, ordering them to "Clear out here!" Horrified by the men's actions, the women, who are surrounded by their ragged children, protest, "You take my life, when you take the means by which I live" and "God forgive the plunderers of my fatherless babes!" Watching the uproar is a genteel young couple walking at right. The woman asks her companion, "Law! Mr. Brown aint you glad that these disgusting beings will no longer offend the eyes of pious and respectable people?" He replies, in an affected accent, "Yes, my de--aw! They are werry of-fensive . . ." In the background is visible the north side of City Hall, from which flies an American flag with the cryptic words "Order Reigns in Warsaw." To the right appears another building marked "Post Office" (actually John Vanderlyn's Rotunda, which over time saw a number of uses as a public building). Weitenkampf suggests that the subject is David Hale, influential publisher of the New York "Journal of Commerce," and his campaign against work on Sundays. The man overturning the table is probably identifiable as Hale.|Entered . . . 1844 by James Baillie.|Lith. & pub. by James Baillie 33 Spruce St. N.Y.|Signed: H. Bucholzer.|The Library's impression was deposited for copyright on June 26, 1844, and is printed on the reverse side of "Loco Foco Triumphal Honors" (no. 1844-31).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 84.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1844-18.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Reading Like a Historian, Unit 1: Introduction
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The Reading Like a Historian curriculum turns students into historical investigators. Students ...

The Reading Like a Historian curriculum turns students into historical investigators. Students may find this change jarring after a steady diet of reading a textbook and answering questions. The three lessons in the Introduction--Lunchroom Fight, Evaluating Sources, and Snapshot Autobiography--help students recognize skills of historical inquiry they already practice everyday, such as reconciling conflicting claims and evaluating the reliability of narrative accounts. The challenge is to apply these skills while reading. Reading Like a Historian classroom posters remind students what questions they should be asking as they read historical documents.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Reading Informational Text
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Unit of Study
Provider:
Stanford History Education Group
Provider Set:
Reading Like a Historian
Reading Like a Historian, Unit 10: New Deal and World War II
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The New Deal and World War II unit features lessons ranging from ...

The New Deal and World War II unit features lessons ranging from Social Security to the dropping of the atomic bomb. It includes a Structured Academic Controversy examining whether the New Deal was a success, and an Inquiry into Japanese-Americans internment during the war. In the Social Security lesson plan, students evaluate historical claims and examine primary documents from the period. Students explore causes of the Zoot Suit Riots in California, and take part in a structured role-play where groups are asked to choose an image that commemorates the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Reading Informational Text
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Unit of Study
Provider:
Stanford History Education Group
Provider Set:
Reading Like a Historian
New England Convention Bunker Hill. September 10th. 1840
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Campaign badge produced for the New England Whig Convention in Boston, September ...

Campaign badge produced for the New England Whig Convention in Boston, September 10-11, 1840. An aureole of light surrounds an oval bust portrait of Harrison, ringed by medallions of the arms of the states of (clockwise from upper left) Connecticut, Vermont, Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. An American eagle, holding arrows, perches on the Vermont seal at top, and the names of Harrison's military triumphs--Ft. Meigs, Thames, and Tippecanoe--appear behind.|Probably published in Boston.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Fischer & Sullivan, no. WHH-14.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-22.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
A Caucus Held At Albany On Sunday Evening April 11th. 1824 By The N.Y. City Members
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A satire condemning the duplicity and conspiracy of the "Bucktail" faction of ...

A satire condemning the duplicity and conspiracy of the "Bucktail" faction of New York Democrats in their April 1824 ouster of New York's ex-governor DeWitt Clinton from his post as canal commissioner. The Library's impression of the print has the missing letters in the names of the figures filled in by hand. Twelve men stand in a room, with a platform, table, and lamp on the right. On the left G[ardiner] is about to exit saying, "I will run home and ask the people how they will like it before I give my vote." To the left of the platform P[ierson] says to B[ourne], "I hope we shall give you a united vote for the removal of Mr. Clinton I have long wished an opportunity to have revenge on him for blowing up the old Burr Conspiracy." B[ourne]: "I am delighted with the prospect! Clinton has always been my devil--it will be impossible to pull him down to our level if we do not dishonor him. I recommend secrecy as success depends upon our taking the members by surprise at the moment of adjournment." Others in the room speak (counterclockwise, from the far left): S[eama]n: "I beg of you to pause ere you adopt any more lobby measures--we were sent here for public good--yet all our measures have for their object individual benefit. This base deed will produce a reaction and may make him Governor. The republican party so justly famed for justice and liberality will in their haste to free themselves from this odium forget and forgive everything." M[ors]e: "The North river squad think the Canal a benefit to ourside [sic] of the City and they will therefore disapprove our dishonoring its founder." D[rake]: "I wish I could be excused from voting, my conscience tells me it is wrong my judgment tells me it will dishonor the State--but the lobby requires it and it must be done." H[yatt]: "I vote here against the measure but if a majority of this meeting decide in its favor I will vote for it in the house tomorrow as my creed is the majority must rule." B[enedict]: "It is inconsistant with a Soldiers honor to build up or pull down any man to gratify angry or sordid passions --besides this lobby influence must be check'd or it will ruin the State." [Henry] W[heaton]: "I will support the measure to punish him for the injury he did our profession by recommending the fee bill and extending the jurisdiction of the judges." [Clarkson] C[rolius]: "I will support the measure in hopes of appeasing the wrath of the Bucktails altho' I fear they are too hard baked to be gull'd in this way. Besides My Insurance Co. & the lobby." W[ar]d: "My vote shall be given for this removal because he is the author of all our troubles about the electoral law. When Govr. he recommended to the Legislature the restoration of the peoples rights." T[own]: "It is true he has been my Benefactor and I ought to shudder at the deed but three months tuition in the hands of the lobby does away these squeamish feelings." Above, in a cloud, is Columbia with an American flag and an eagle, saying, "I renounce them and their ways."|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Murrell, p. 98.|Weitenkampf, p. 21.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1824-1.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Reading Like a Historian, Unit 11: Cold War
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These lessons focus on events surrounding the Cold War. The first is ...

These lessons focus on events surrounding the Cold War. The first is an inquiry into its causes, comparing Soviet and American perspectives. Opening Up the Textbook lessons ask students to question textbook accounts of the CIA's covert operations in Guatemala, and compare how North and South Korean textbooks cover the Korean War. Students analyze declassified government documents about the Cuban Missile Crisis, and try to determine whether the U.S. intended to escalate military operations in Vietnam before the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. In the lesson on Truman and MacArthur, students gauge public response to MacArthur's dismissal by analyzing memos and letters sent to President Truman.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Reading Informational Text
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Unit of Study
Provider:
Stanford History Education Group
Provider Set:
Reading Like a Historian
September 11, 2001, Documentary Project
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This site captures eyewitness accounts, reactions, and opinions of people in the ...

This site captures eyewitness accounts, reactions, and opinions of people in the months after the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and United Airlines Flight 93. This online presentation includes nearly 200 audio and video interviews, 45 photos and drawings, and 21 written narratives.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
American Memory
The Making of African American Identiy Volume 1, 1500-1865: Primary Sources
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The National Humanities center presents reading guides with primary source materials for ...

The National Humanities center presents reading guides with primary source materials for the study of The Making of African American Identity: Volume 1: 1500-1865. Primary source materials include narratives, photographs, letters, memoirs, songs, newspapers, petitions, addresses, journals, paintings and more. Sources are divided into the topics: Freedom, Enslavement, Community, Identity, and Emancipation.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
America In Class
Reading Like a Historian, Unit 12: Cold War Culture/Civil Rights
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In this unit, students explore social, cultural, and political events that helped ...

In this unit, students explore social, cultural, and political events that helped define America in the decades following the Second World War. The lesson on the Civil Rights movement revolves around the question: Why did the Montgomery Bus Boycott succeed? In another, students compare speeches by JFK and John Lewis regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In the Women in the 1950s lesson plan, students use secondary sources and popular images to explore whether "the happy housewife" was reality or perception. Finally, students will encounter opposing views on whether the Great Society was successful, and what led many Americans came to oppose the Vietnam War.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
Reading Informational Text
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Unit of Study
Provider:
Stanford History Education Group
Provider Set:
Reading Like a Historian
The Looking Glass For 1787. A House Divided Against Itself Cannot Stand. Mat. Chap. 13th Verse 26
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A satire touching on some of the major issues in Connecticut politics ...

A satire touching on some of the major issues in Connecticut politics on the eve of the ratification of the U.S. Constitution. The two rival factions shown are the "Federals," who represented the trading interests and were for taxes on imports, and the "Antifederals," who represented agrarian interests and were more receptive to paper money issues. The two groups were also divided on the issue of commutation of military pensions. The artist here evidently sides with the Federals. Connecticut is symbolized by a wagon (top center) loaded with debts and paper money, the weight of which causes it to sink slowly into the mud. Its driver warns, "Gentlemen this Machine is deep in the mire and you are divided as to its releaf--" The wagon is pulled in opposite directions by two factions of the state's Council of Twelve. On the left under a beaming sun are five Federal councillors, who proclaim: "Pay Commutation," "Drive them to it," "I abhor the antifederal Faction," and "Comply with Congress." On the right the sky fills with angry storm clouds spewing thunderbolts, while the earth erupts in flames. Below six of the council's Antifederal members pull on their chain crying: "Tax Luxury," "the People are oprest," "curses on to Foederal Govermt.," "Success to Shays" (an allusion to charges that they sympathized with agrarian radicals led by Daniel Shay in Massachusetts), and "Curse Independence." The seventh Antifederal on the council, William Williams (here labeled with his press pseudonym "Agricola"), also appears. He stands defecating at right, with his trousers undone and a small animal--probably a skunk--between his feet. Williams remarks, "I fear & dread the Ides of May" (i.e. the May 15 elections to the upper house). The skunk sprays toward Williams's enemy Samuel Holden Parsons (far right, identified as "S--H--P"), president of the state's Society of the Cincinnati. Parsons, also obscenely bending over, sprays back saying, "A good Shot." In the left middleground, "Cato," a pseudonymous contributor to the "New Haven Gazette," comments, "I despise your Copper" to the man beside him, who holds a Connecticut coin and mutters, "Cur's commutation." In the center a farmer with a plough, rake, and bottle complains, "Takes all to pay taxes." In the left foreground three members of the Connecticut Wits stand on the Mount "Parnassus," and read from a scroll "American Antiquities" (excerpts from their "Anarchiad" published in Connecticut newspapers beginning in October 1786). To the right is the Connecticut shoreline and the buildings of Manhattan, the latter threatened by thunderbolts from the upper right. Three merchant vessels ply a body of water below, "From Connecticut to New York paying L40000 per annum Impost." In the left corner a tiny figure sits at a w7riting desk, reading a paper with the verse: "Tweedles Studdy/as I sit plodding by my taper." This piece alludes to a satirical poem by "Trustless Fox" in the "New Haven Gazette" of November 23, 1786. Its opening lines are: "As I sat plodding by my taper, I wreaked a glance into the paper . . . ." The interpretation given above is largely based on the commentary of a Sotheby's cataloger (see reference below). That writer suggests that "Trustless Fox" and the designer of "The Looking Glass for 1787" may have been one and the same, based on the references to material in the New Haven Press. |Attribution to Amos Doolittle is from the Sotheby's auction catalog.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Sotheby's "Fine Printed and Manuscript Americana." (Catalog of the auction sale April 16, 1988). New York: Sotheby's, 1988, no. 44.|Weitenkampf, p. 11.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1787-1.|Exhibited in: Creating the United States, Library of Congress, 2008.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Democracy Against The Unnatural Union. Trial Octr. 14th 1817.
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A satire on the 1817 Pennsylvania gubernatorial race between William Findlay and ...

A satire on the 1817 Pennsylvania gubernatorial race between William Findlay and Joseph Heister. The artist clearly favors the former, and charges corruption in Heister's campaign. Findlay appears to be buoyed toward the governor's chair by the voices of a crowd of voters, who stand around a ballot box (or platform) on the left. From various members of the crowd come the words: "voice of the people," "the man of our Choice," "Chosen with open doors," "no bribery or Corruption," "let me impress it on your minds who was nominated by 113 delegates of true Republican principles," "I will record the deed," and "True Democracy." Findlay says, "How easy do I ascend." On the right another crowd is assembled. Several men hold up a platform made of bundles of the "Aurora" and "U.S.Gazette" newspapers and "Shingles bought at 10 pounds and paid for at 8 pounds," which in turn supports planks "Federalism," "Old Schoolism" and "1364 Dollars." On top stands candidate Heister, holding a paper "Serious Reflections . . . " and saying "Mercy on me-What a foundation I stand upon!!!" Various people below say: "I would Vote for Old Nick provided I could get a good Office," "I am thinking to myself how foolish we shall look if we do not Succeed," "We must have recourse to all kinds of Strategem or we cannot succeed," and "I do not much relish this Union But Concience [sic] Avaunt." An eagle with olive branch on the left and lightning bolts on the right appears in the sky below the chair. |Designed and Executed by one who has neither place nor pension.|The print has been convincingly attributed by William Murrell to William Charles. The Library of Congress has two states of the print, in the second of which the shading is reinforced with rocker or roulette work.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Murrell, p. 95.|Weitenkampf, p. 20.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1817-1.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
U.S. History I (HIST 146)
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This course is the first in the introductory surveys of U.S. History. ...

This course is the first in the introductory surveys of U.S. History. After exploring North America before the arrival of Europeans, students will study the early interactions of Europeans with indigenous peoples and, as the course progresses, study the history of peoples in the area now defined by the United States' borders. Those who would like to pursue their study of American history will also want to take Hist 147 (U.S. History II) and Hist 148 (U.S. History III).Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library