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Analyzing Community Issues through the Flint, MI Water Contamination Crisis (REVISED)
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Remix and Share
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These 3 lessons are for high ABE/low ASE students at a level D-E Reading level to practice identifying key points in video and text and analyzing the causes and effects of social issues, and identifying solutions to these problems. By watching two short videos and reading EPA materials on the effects of lead exposure and a short article on the specific drinking water crisis in Flint, MI, students will examine key issues, analyze the problem and its causes, identify approaches to solving this problem and ones like it in other locations, and apply this approach to other scenarios that are relevant to their immediate lives.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Reading
Author:
Ruth Sugar
Date Added:
06/21/2016
Chemicals in the Environment: Toxicology and Public Health (BE.104J), Spring 2005
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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This course addresses the challenges of defining a relationship between exposure to environmental chemicals and human disease. Course topics include epidemiological approaches to understanding disease causation; biostatistical methods; evaluation of human exposure to chemicals, and their internal distribution, metabolism, reactions with cellular components, and biological effects; and qualitative and quantitative health risk assessment methods used in the U.S. as bases for regulatory decision-making. Throughout the term, students consider case studies of local and national interest.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Genetics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Sherley, James
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Molecular Structure of 1,2dichloronapthalene
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1,2-Dichloronaphthalene is a PCN (polychlorinated naphthalenes) which is synthesized in a mixture of several congeners, ranging from thin liquids to hard waxes to high melting point solids. PCNs have been used as waxes and impregnants (for protective coatings), water repellents, and wood preservatives. The major sources of release of chlorinated naphthalenes into the environment are likely to be from waste incineration and disposal of items containing chlorinated naphthalenes to landfill. PCNs are no longer produced due to their toxicity. Like related compounds (such as PCBs), chlorinated naphthalenes have been demonstrated to be inducers of the cytochrome P-450 (CYP) dependent microsomal enzymes. The environmental impact of PCNs has not been extensively investigated, and PCN concentrations have only been measured in the environment in a few rare cases. Chlorinated naphthalenes are expected to adsorb onto soil and sediments to a large extent, and have been identified to do as such in drainage ditches and sediments from Florida and the San Francisco bay. PCNs have also been identified in birds of prey in Britain and the Netherlands.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Contributed by Indiana University
Date Added:
08/15/2002
Molecular Structure of 2-Acetylaminofluorene
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2-Acetylaminofluorene is used by scientists to study the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of aromatic amines and as a positive control in the study of liver enzymes. 2-Acetylaminofluorene was intended for use as a pesticide but was never marketed because of its carcinogenicity in experimental animals.2-Acetylaminofluorene is reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen based on sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals. The EPA has not classified 2-acetylaminofluorene for carcinogenicity. Causes are reduced functioning of liver, kidneys, bladder, and pancreas. 2-Acetylaminofluorene occurs as light tan crystalline needles. It is insoluble in water and soluble in alcohols, glycols, ether, acetic acid, and fat solvents. 2-Acetylaminofluorene is available as a grade that is 95 to 98% pure. When heated to decomposition, it emits toxic fumes of nitrogen oxides (NOx).

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained courtesy of the Cambridge Structural Database
Date Added:
09/27/2002
Molecular Structure of Acetophenone
Rating

Acetophenone can be used as a fragrance ingredient in soaps, detergents, and perfumes; as a flavoring agent in foods, nonalcoholic beverages, and tobacco; and as a solvent for polymers. Acetophenone is used in perfumery industry, mostly in fragrances like honeysuckle and jasmine, flavors of almond, cherry and strawberry and in tobacco and vanilla works. It is released into the environment from a variety of combustion processes and may be released during its manufacture. Acetophenone has been detected in ambient air and drinking water; exposure of the general public may occur through the inhalation of contaminated air or the consumption of contaminated water. Acute exposure of humans to the vapors of acetophenone may produce skin irritation and transient corneal injury. Acute oral exposure has been observed to cause hypnotic or sedative effects, hematological effects, and a weakened pulse.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained courtesy of the Cambridge Structural Database
Date Added:
10/11/2002
Molecular Structure of Barium Chloride
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Barium Chloride was the byproduct of the discovery of radium by Madame Curie. When refining radium, the final separation resulted in barium chloride and radium chloride. Electrophoresis of barium chloride produces small-scale amounts of barium atom. This can be used for obtaining barium for commercial uses. Applications of barium chloride include stimulating the heart and other muscles for medicinal purposes, and also for softening water. Other uses of barium chloride include the manufacturing of barium salts, as pesticide, pigments, boiler detergent, in purifying sugar, as mordant in dyeing and printing textiles, and in the manufacture of caustic soda, polymers, and stabilizers.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Contributed by Indiana University
Date Added:
08/15/2002
Molecular Structure of Chlorate ion
Rating

Industrial chlorates are solely produced by electrolysis of hot sodium chloride solutions. This chlorate electrolysis is performed without the separation of the anode and the cathode regions Electrolysis of chlorate is undesired due to the fact that it consumes large amounts of energy. Chlorate is a very strong oxidizing agent. It is spontaneously ignites into flames when it comes in contact with objects such as wood and paper. Concentrated chlorate is used to destroy organic materials when testing for inorganic constituents. Alkali chlorates are colorless, stable as solids at room temperature and soluble in water. Mixtures of solid chlorates and substances like phosphorus and sulfur are explosive. Chlorates are used in fireworks and are toxic in human and other mammals.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Contributed by Indiana University
Date Added:
09/09/2002
Molecular Structure of Methanol
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In England in 1661, Irish chemist Robert Boyle discovered methanol as a byproduct of the distillation of wood, hence the archaic names, spirit of wood and wood alcohol. Methanol is a clear, flammable, and toxic liquid that can cause blindness if repeatedly inhaled or ingested. Consumption (>2 Tbsp) can be fatal, but the body can metabolize small amounts. Methanol is prepared by the catalytic combination reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen gases under high pressures. It is used in fuel mixtures to stretch the life of gasoline, in addition to its use in windshield washer fluid (50% MeOH) and paint strippers. Also methanol is used as industrial solvent in manufacture of streptomycin, vitamins, hormones, polymers and plastics.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Contributed by Indiana University
Date Added:
08/14/2002
Molecular Structure of Perchlorate
Rating

Perchlorate commonly combines with Aluminum, Sodium, Potassium, or Magnesium to form their salts. Aluminum perchlorate is used as a solid propellant fuel in rockets, missiles, and fireworks. Other salts are used in fertilizers. Due to its ionic nature, perchlorate readily dissolves in water and is very difficult to dissociate. Studies have shown that perchlorate is toxic to the thyroid and can impair brain development when consumed through sources such as drinking water.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Contributed by Indiana University
Date Added:
09/09/2002
Molecular Structure of Peroxide ion
Rating

Dr. I. N. Love reported the first medical use of peroxide in 1888 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. In it he described the many successful treatments of diseases with peroxide. It would be used following World War I to treat pneumonia. Peroxide is very toxic and can cause severe skin irritations. Contact with many organic compounds can lead to immediate fires or violent explosions. Peroxide is most commonly used for bleaching, deodorizing, and antiseptic purposes. It is a common lab reagent and is used in epoxidation, hydroxylation, and oxidation-reduction reactions. The human body produces peroxide in the immune system to fight off invading microorganisms and aid in metabolizing fats, vitamins, proteins, and carbohydrates.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Contributed by Indiana University
Date Added:
09/18/2002
Molecular Structure of Phenol
Rating

Phenol is a crystalline solid that is colorless or white. It melts at about 41°C, boils at 182°C, and it is soluble in ethanol and ether and a little bit in water. In industry, phenol is essential for making certain artificial resin such as Bakelite. It is also a component of desinfectants, dyes, weed killers, insecticides, explosives, and many drugs such as ear and nose drops. However, breathing and dermal exposure to phenol is very harmful to the skin, eyes, and mucous membranes in humans. It is toxic when taken orally. An exposure to phenol may occur through breathing contaminated air, skin contact, and ingesting of phenol-containing pharmaceuticals. Tobacco smoke and certain foods contain phenol as well.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained from the Protein Data Bank
Date Added:
05/08/2003
Molecular Structure of Phosgene
Rating

Phosgene is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of many chemicals including polycarbonates, pesticides, isocyanates, dyes, pharmaceuticals, and polyurethane. Phosgene is a combustion by-product of most volatile chlorinated compounds. It is released into the environment when household substances such as paint removers, dry-cleaning fluids, and certain solvents are exposed to fire or heat. Phosgene reacts violently and decomposes to toxic compounds on contact with moisture. It is highly toxic and it is an irritant to the respiratory tract, skin, and eyes. Phosgene poisoning may cause cardiovascular and respiratory failure.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Contributed by Indiana University
Date Added:
10/01/2002
Molecular Structure of Picric acid
Rating

Picric Acid was first discovered in 1771 by a British Chemist named Peter Woulfe by treatment of indigo with nitric acid. It is most commonly seen in its yellow, water-soluble, crystalline form. For this reason, picric acid first saw use as a dyeing agent in textiles. However, around 1849 it was discovered (for obvious reasons) that picric acid is a shock, heat, and friction-sensitive explosive. Its first use as an explosive material came in military weaponry: torpedoes in particular due to its shock-sensitive nature not requiring a detonator to explode on contact with a target. However, picric acid was found to be highly corrosive to metals, making the weapons very difficult to handle and the acid itself difficult to store. Today, picric acid is used more widely as an ingredient in the manufacture of inert dyes and stable explosives such as dynamite.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained courtesy of the Cambridge Structural Database
Date Added:
09/23/2002
Molecular Structure of Picryl chloride
Rating

Picryl chloride is ranked as one of the 100 most commonly found explosive and shock sensitive materials. It is made by reacting 2,4,6 trinitrophenol with thionyl chloride. This highly reactive compound is known to be hazardous and toxic, and to cause liver injury in mice. It is often used as a sensitization agent in mice when their cells undergo hypersensitivity studies.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained courtesy of the Cambridge Structural Database
Date Added:
09/20/2002
The Shark and the Lamprey: Basking Sharks
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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This video features the remarkable discovery Jonathan made in 1998 about Basking sharks, the second largest fish on Earth. While diving with Basking sharks in the frigid waters of the Bay of Fundy, Jonathan saw parasitic lampreys on the backs of the sharks. This had never before been documented, so he returned the next year with a shark biologist and a lamprey biologist to attempt to recover living lampreys from the backs of Basking sharks. They didn't think Jonathan could do it. Wait until you see what happens! Please see the accompanying lesson plan for educational objectives, discussion points and classroom activities.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Oceanography
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Jonathan Bird's Blue World
Provider Set:
Jonathan Bird's Blue World
Author:
Jonathan Bird Productions
Oceanic Research Group
Date Added:
03/01/2007
Toxic Blaster
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Toxic chemicals are endangering life on Earth, affecting every person and animal. In the "Toxic Blaster" game you need to pilot a Jet-Sub and blast away the threat of human contamination. The game is also available in French, Dutch, Danish, Polish and Finnish languages at http://wwf.panda.org/how_you_can_help/games/.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Provider:
World Wildlife Fund
Author:
WWF
Date Added:
03/11/2011