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  • Suspension
Bridge Types: Tensile & Compressive Forces
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Students explore how tension and compression forces act on three different bridge ...

Students explore how tension and compression forces act on three different bridge types. Using sponges, cardboard and string, they create models of beam, arch and suspension bridges and apply forces to understand how they disperse or transfer these loads.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Engineering
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Chris Valenti
Denali Lander
Denise W. Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,
Joe Friedrichsen
Jonathan S. Goode
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Natalie Mach
Bridging the Gaps
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Students are presented with a brief history of bridges as they learn ...

Students are presented with a brief history of bridges as they learn about the three main bridge types: beam, arch and suspension. They are introduced to two natural forces tension and compression common to all bridges and structures. Throughout history, and today, bridges are important for connecting people to resources, places and other people. Students become more aware of the variety and value of bridges around us in our everyday lives.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Engineering
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Lesson Plans
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Christopher Valenti
Denali Lander
Denise W. Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering,
Joe Friedrichsen
Jonathan S. Goode
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Natalie Mach
Construction Technologies: Create the Strongest Bridge
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Students work in pairs to create three simple types of model bridges ...

Students work in pairs to create three simple types of model bridges (beam, arch, suspension). They observe quantitatively how the bridges work under load and why engineers use different types of bridges for different places. They also get an idea of the parts needed to build bridges, and their functions. The strength of model bridges is mainly a factor of the quality of materials used, and therefore they do not provide a clear visual representation of tension and compression forces involved. Yet, students are able to see these forces at work in three prototype designs and draw conclusions about their dependence on span, width and supporting structures of the bridge designs.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Engineering
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Joy Trahan-Liptak
K-12 Outreach Office,
Forecasting Dust Storms - Version 2
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Forecasting Dust Storms Version 2 provides background and operational information about dust ...

Forecasting Dust Storms Version 2 provides background and operational information about dust storms. The first part of the module describes dust source regions, the life cycle of a dust storm, and the major types of dust storms, particularly those found in the Middle East. The second part presents a process for forecasting dust storms and applies it to a case in the Middle East. Although the process refers to U.S. Department of Defense models and tools, it can easily be adapted to other forecast requirements and data sources. Note that this module is an updated version of the original one published in 2003.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Astronomy
Atmospheric Science
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Data
Full Course
Images and Illustrations
Instructional Material
Interactive
Lecture Notes
Simulations
Provider:
UCAR
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
COMET/MetEd Program Collection
DLESE Community Collection
Author:
COMET
Slow the Cylinder
Conditions of Use:
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Students learn why shock absorbers are necessary on vehicles, how they dampen ...

Students learn why shock absorbers are necessary on vehicles, how they dampen the action of springs, and what factors determine the amount of dampening. They conduct an experiment to determine the effect of spring strength and port diameter on the effectiveness of a shock absorber. Using a syringe, a set of springs, and liquids of different viscosities, students determine the effects of changing pressures and liquids on the action of a model shock absorber. They analyze their data through the lens of an engineer.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power RET and ERC,
Cliff Orgaard (Alexandria, MN)
Marissa H. Forbes