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American Government and Politics in the Information Age
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This text is a comprehensive introduction to the vital subject of American government and politics. Governments decide who gets what, when, how (See Harold D. Lasswell, Politics: Who Gets What, When, How, [New York: McGraw-Hill, 1936]); they make policies and pass laws that are binding on all a society’s members; they decide about taxation and spending, benefits and costs, even life and death.Governments possess power—the ability to gain compliance and to get people under their jurisdiction to obey them—and they may exercise their power by using the police and military to enforce their decisions. However, power need not involve the exercise of force or compulsion; people often obey because they think it is in their interest to do so, they have no reason to disobey, or they fear punishment. Above all, people obey their government because it has authority; its power is seen by people as rightfully held, as legitimate. People can grant their government legitimacy because they have been socialized to do so; because there are processes, such as elections, that enable them to choose and change their rulers; and because they believe that their governing institutions operate justly.Politics is the process by which leaders are selected and policy decisions are made and executed. It involves people and groups, both inside and outside of government, engaged in deliberation and debate, disagreement and conflict, cooperation and consensus, and power struggles.In covering American government and politics, this text introduces the intricacies of the Constitution, the complexities of federalism, the meanings of civil liberties, and the conflicts over civil rights;explains how people are socialized to politics, acquire and express opinions, and participate in political life; describes interest groups, political parties, and elections—the intermediaries that link people to government and politics; details the branches of government and how they operate; and shows how policies are made and affect people’s lives.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Minnesota
Provider Set:
University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing
Author:
David L. Paletz
Diana Owen
Timothy E. Cook
Date Added:
06/06/2011
Anticipating Hazardous Weather and Community Risk, 2nd Edition
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Anticipating Hazardous Weather and Community Risk, 2nd Edition provides emergency managers and other decision makers with background information about weather, natural hazards, and preparedness. Additional topics include risk communication, human behavior, and effective warning partnerships, as well as a desktop exercise allowing the learner to practice the types of decisions required as hazardous situations unfold. This module offers web-based content designed to address topics covered in the multi-day Hazardous Weather and Flood Preparedness course offered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the National Weather Service (NWS). The module also complements other onsite courses by those agencies and provides useful information for evaluating and preparing for threats from a range of weather and natural hazards.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
COMET MetEd Collection
Author:
COMET
Date Added:
06/01/2012
Chinese Exclusion Act
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Starting with the Gold Rush, Chinese migrated to California and other regions of the United States in search of work. As several photographs show, many Chinese found work in the gold mines and on the railroads. They accepted $32.50 a month to work on the Union Pacific in Wyoming in 1870 for the same job that paid white workers $52 a month. This led to deep resentment by the whites, who felt the Chinese were competing unfairly for jobs. White labor unions blamed the Chinese for lower wages and lack of jobs, and anti-Chinese feelings grew. The cartoon "You Know How It Is Yourself" expresses this sentiment. Several political cartoons in this topic are graphic representations of racism and conflicts between whites and Chinese. "Won't They Remain Here in Spite of the New Constitution?" shows a demonized figure of political corruption protecting Chinese cheap labor, dirty politicians, capital, and financiers. "The Tables Turned" shows Denis Kearney (head of the Workingman's Party of California, a union that had criticized Chinese laborers) in jail, being taunted by Chinese men. In 1880, President Rutherford B. Hayes signed the Chinese Exclusion Treaty, which placed strict limitations on the number of Chinese allowed to enter the United States and the number allowed to become naturalized citizens. In 1882, Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which prohibited immigration from China (The Act was not repealed until 1943). The two-part cartoon from the July-December 1882 issue of The Wasp reflects how some citizens saw the situation. After the Act was passed, anti-Chinese violence increased. One illustration depicts the Rock Springs Massacre of 1885, a Wyoming race riot in which 28 Chinese were killed by British and Swedish miners. The "Certificate of Residence" document illustrates that Chinese individuals were required to prove their residence in the United States prior to the passage of the Exclusion Act. The poster offering a reward for Wong Yuk, a Chinese man, makes it clear that the United States was actively deporting Chinese. Despite discrimination and prejudice, this first wave of immigrants established thriving communities. Photographs taken in San Francisco's Chinatown show prosperous businesses, such as the "Chinese Butcher and Grocery Shop." Wealthy merchants formed active business associations, represented by the image "Officers of the Chinese Six Companies." The Chinese celebrated their heritage by holding cultural festivals, as shown in the photograph from 1896. The photographs "Children of High Class," "Golden Gate Park," and "Chinese Passengers on Ferry" are evidence that some Chinese adopted Western-style clothing while others wore more traditional attire.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
University of California
Provider Set:
Calisphere - California Digital Library
Date Added:
04/25/2013
Guidelines on how to analyze a social science article (or social science documentary film)
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No Strings Attached
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A guide on how to read an article, for undergraduate students. It’s designed for anthropology classes but might work for other social sciences as well.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Date Added:
01/01/2017
History Commons
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"The Digital Commons Network provides free access to full-text scholarly articles and other research from hundreds of universities and colleges worldwide. Curated by university librarians and their supporting institutions, this dynamic research tool includes peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, dissertations, working papers, conference proceedings, and other original scholarly work."

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Data Set
Author:
Alec Buchholtz
Columbia College Chicago
Digital Commons Network™
Elvia Arcelia Quintana Adriano
Laurel Davis
Lauren M
Maine Bicentennial Conference
Sharon K
Tabitha Deering
University Of Maine
Xavier University - Cincinnati
Date Added:
03/22/2019
The Impact of Nuclear Fallout
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Earl Ubell is a pioneer among science and health writers in America. After a long, distinguished career at The New York Herald Tribune from 1943 to 1966, he went on to work at both CBS and NBC News. Prominent in the emerging scientific writing community in the 1950s and early 1960s, he was a recipient of the Lasker Medical Journalism Award 1957. Milton Stanley Livingston was a leading physicist in the field of magnetic resonance accelerators. Working first with professor Ernest O. Lawrence at the University of California, Livingston was instrumental in the development of the Berkeley cyclotron. Moving to Cornell in 1938, Livingston was part of the core group who established nuclear physics as a field of study. Choosing to stay with the Cornell cyclotron rather than follow colleagues onto the Manhattan Project, Livingston was involved in the production of radioisotopes for medical purposes. At the time of this interview, Livingston was director of the Cambridge Electron Accelerator, a joint project of Harvard University and MIT.In this program segment Louis Lyons quizzes Earl Ubell about the lack of public knowledge and the perception of the nuclear bomb, while pressing Professor Livingston to explain exactly what nuclear fallout is, and the danger it presents.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
WGBH Open Vault
Date Added:
12/20/2000
In the Mountains of New Mexico
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At age twenty-seven, physicist Philip Morrison joined the Manhattan Project, the code name given to the U.S. government's covert effort at Los Alamos to develop the first nuclear weapon. The Manhattan Project was also the most expensive single program ever financed by public funds. In this video segment, Morrison describes the charismatic leadership of his mentor, J. Robert Oppenheimer, and the urgency of their mission to manufacture a weapon 'which if we didn't make first would lead to the loss of the war." In the interview Morrison conducted for War and Peace in the Nuclear Age: 'Dawn,' he describes the remote, inaccessible setting of the laboratory that operated in extreme secrecy. It was this physical isolation, he maintains, that allowed scientists extraordinary freedom to exchange ideas with fellow physicists. Morrison also reflects on his wartime fears. Germany had many of the greatest minds in physics and engineering, which created tremendous anxiety among Allied scientists that it would win the atomic race and the war, and Morrison recalls the elaborate schemes he devised to determine that country's atomic progress. At the time that he was helping assemble the world's first atomic bomb, Morrison believed that nuclear weapons 'could be made part of the construction of the peace.' A month after the war, he toured Hiroshima, and for several years thereafter he testified, became a public spokesman, and lobbied for international nuclear cooperation. After leaving Los Alamos, Morrison returned to academia. For the rest of his life he was a forceful voice against nuclear weapons.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
WGBH Open Vault
Date Added:
02/26/1986
Mathematics for the Liberal Arts
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This course was originally developed for the Open Course Library project.  The text used is Math in Society, edited by David Lippman, Pierce College Ft Steilacoom.  Development of this book was supported, in part, by the Transition Math Project and the Open Course Library Project. Topics covered in the course include problem solving, voting theory, graph theory, growth models, finance, data collection and description, and probability.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Extended Learning Institute
Lumen Learning
Northern Virginia Community College
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Author:
David Lippman
Date Added:
03/31/2016
Open Social Work Education
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Open Social Work Education (OSWE) is a collaborative project dedicated to open educational resources (OER) in social work.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Work
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Dr. Matt DeCarlo
Date Added:
03/27/2019
Psychology In Everyday Life: The Psych Files podcast
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The Psych Files is a blog and podcast written and hosted by an experienced psychology teacher and elearning specialist.The content is designed for anyone interested in a variety of topics one would find in an introductory psychology course. Upbeat and engaging podcasts are supported by links to websites and suggested classroom and student activities.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Simulation
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Marist College
Provider Set:
Psychology
Author:
Michael A. Britt Ph.D.
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Psychology as a Social Science
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Provides standard introduction to psychology course content with a specific emphasis on social aspects of psychology. This includes expanded content related to social cognition, aggression, attraction and similar topics.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Ed Diener
Robert Biswas-Diener
Date Added:
01/01/2015
Research Methods in Political Science
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This course introduces some of the basic research tools in the political scientistĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĄ_tool kitĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺÎĺ and discusses why and how certain tools are used to explore certain phenomena. Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to: describe the relationship between the scientific method and political science; formulate research questions, theories, and hypotheses; describe the basics of the standard research approaches in political science; evaluate the soundness of a research design; perform basic statistical analyses; execute basic research in the political science discipline. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Political Science 251)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/16/2012
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Vaccine Debate
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No Strings Attached
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Students will gather information and data about vaccine information. They will use this information to argue whether or not vaccinations should be mandatory, culminating in a summative assessment in the form of a debate and a reflection on the information gathered.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Ryanne Dennis
Molly Horn
Madeleine Wright
Date Added:
08/08/2019
World History 6th grade Early Humans
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This lesson is based on Pearson's My World History and Geography adopted for instruction in TN for the 6th grade World History class.
It covers the unit on early human migration and the Ice Age adaptations.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Natalia Suit
Date Added:
11/13/2018
A quick, free, somewhat easy-to-read introduction to empirical social science research methods
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A free, brief textbook to introduce students to the core concepts of empirical social science research methods, available in PDF (main download link below) and EPUB (additional file below). This textbook has been used as the main textbook in an undergraduate social science research methods course (supplemented by many in-class exercises and research reports) and as the basis of a review in preparation for graduate-level study in research methods and program evaluation.

Contents: (1) Identifying the research question (and an aside about theory); (2) Conceptualizing and operationalizing (and sometimes hypothesizing); (3) Data collection structured by formal research designs; (3.1) Sampling; (3.2) Data collection methods; (3.3) Formal research designs; (4) Data analysis; (5) Generalizing and theorizing; (6) Evaluating research: Validity and reliability; (7) Research ethics; (8) Appendix A: More research designs; (9) Appendix B: Elaboration modeling; (10) Appendix C: Research Methods Glossary.

A note to instructors: If you use this text in any way, whether as the primary text, a supplemental text, or a recommended resource, I ask only two small favors: (1) When you make it available to students, please always include a link back to the text’s download site, https://scholar.utc.edu/oer/1/. While you are free to download and distribute the text intact under the Creative Commons 4.0 license, my preference is that you point students to this website to download it themselves. Seeing the download numbers tick up is a treat, and I plan to add additional appendices over time, so the download file will be updated occasionally. (2) Please send me a quick email at Christopher-Horne@utc.edu letting me know you’re using it. I certainly welcome your feedback as well. Thank you, and best wishes for successful research methods instruction.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Tennessee Chattanooga
Author:
Christopher S. Horne
Date Added:
04/21/2018