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  • Social Change
Activism in the US
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The United States has a long history of activists seeking social, political, economic, and other changes to America—along with a history of other activists trying to prevent such changes. American activism covered a wide range of causes and utilized many different forms of activism. American sociopolitical activism became especially prominent during the period of societal upheaval which began during the 1950s. The African American civil rights movement led the way, soon followed by a substantial anti-war movement opposing American involvement in the Vietnam War, and later by vigorous activism involving women’s issues, gay rights, and other causes. The United States remains a land of nearly constant change, and activists play a significant role in the ongoing evolution of American democracy. It seems likely that Americans will remain enthusiastic activists in the future. This exhibition is part of the Digital Library of Georgia.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Library of Georgia
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
An Analysis of the Millennial Generation
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

Students will look at data showing how the “millennial” generation differs from other generations. They will analyze and evaluate social changes evident in the data. Then they will work with a partner to compose a newsletter.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
10/18/2019
The Boycott, Then and Now
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The boycott is one of the most powerful, time-tested tactics that social movements have at their disposal. History offers many examples of people joining together to exercise their power as consumers in support of movements for social justice, civil rights, and workers' rights. By calling for people to not spend their money on a target good or service, boycotts can aid these movements by drawing on a wider base of supporters who would otherwise be unable to participate.

This lesson examines the historical development of the boycott as a tactic - with examples of its use by both progressives and conservatives - and looks at some recent boycotts that are related to hot-button political issues.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Author:
Mark Engler
Date Added:
06/28/2012
Community Tool Box
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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The Community Tool Box is a free, online resource for those working to build healthier communities and bring about social change. Our mission is to promote community health and development by connecting people, ideas, and resources. The Community Tool Box is a public service developed and managed by the KU Center for Community Health and Development and partners nationally and internationally. The Tool Box is a part of the Center’s role as a designated World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Community Health and Development.

Professors and instructors from various disciplines use the Community Tool Box as a resource for their teaching. The Tool Box is often used as course text in the fields of public health, community psychology, nursing, social welfare, and other applied fields.

Chapter 1. Our Model for Community Change and Improvement
Chapter 2. Other Models for Promoting Community Health and Development
Chapter 3. Assessing Community Needs and Resources
Chapter 4. Getting Issues on the Public Agenda
Chapter 5. Choosing Strategies to Promote Community Health and Development
Chapter 6. Communications to Promote Interest
Chapter 7. Encouraging Involvement in Community Work
Chapter 8. Developing a Strategic Plan
Chapter 9. Developing an Organizational Structure for the Initiative
Chapter 10. Hiring and Training Key Staff of Community Organizations
Chapter 11. Recruiting and Training Volunteers
Chapter 12. Providing Training and Technical Assistance
Chapter 13. Orienting Ideas in Leadership
Chapter 14. Core Functions in Leadership
Chapter 15. Becoming an Effective Manager
Chapter 16. Group Facilitation and Problem-Solving
Chapter 17. Analyzing Community Problems and Solutions
Chapter 18. Deciding Where to Start
Chapter 19. Choosing and Adapting Community Interventions
Chapter 20. Providing Information and Enhancing Skills
Chapter 21. Enhancing Support, Incentives, and Resources
Chapter 22. Youth Mentoring Programs
Chapter 23. Modifying Access, Barriers, and Opportunities
Chapter 24. Improving Services
Chapter 25. Changing Policies
Chapter 26. Changing the Physical and Social Environment
Chapter 27. Cultural Competence in a Multicultural World
Chapter 28. Spirituality and Community Building
Chapter 29. The Arts and Community Building
Chapter 30. Principles of Advocacy
Chapter 31. Conducting Advocacy Research
Chapter 32. Providing Encouragement and Education
Chapter 33. Conducting a Direct Action Campaign
Chapter 34. Media Advocacy
Chapter 35. Responding to Counterattacks
Chapter 36. Introduction to Evaluation
Chapter 37. Operations in Evaluating Community Interventions
Chapter 38. Some Methods for Evaluating Comprehensive Community Initiatives
Chapter 39. Using Evaluation to Understand and Improve the Initiative
Chapter 40. Maintaining Quality Performance
Chapter 41. Rewarding Accomplishments
Chapter 42. Getting Grants and Financial Resources
Chapter 43. Managing Finances
Chapter 44. Investing in Community Resources
Chapter 45. Social Marketing of Successful Components of the Initiative
Chapter 46. Planning for Sustainability

Sample syllabi are also available: https://ctb.ku.edu/en/teaching-with-the-community-tool-box

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Communication
Public Relations
Social Work
Sociology
Material Type:
Reading
Textbook
Author:
Center for Community Health and Development at the University of Kansas
Date Added:
03/13/2019
English Language Arts, Grade 12
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

The 12th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 12th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Language study is embedded in every 12th grade unit as students use annotation to closely review aspects of each text. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Social Class and the Law
Rating

The laws that govern and the social norms that regulate society are not always fair, legal, moral, or ethical. What is a person to do about all this injustice? What are the hazards of righting injustices or changing social norms? And what are the dangers of doing nothing?

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate Antigone, “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” and Pygmalion.
Students write a literary analysis showing the effect of social class or the law on a character’s life.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How do social class and legal institutions shape literary characters’ lives (and presumably our lives)?
How does social class affect a person in dealing with the law (protect a person, hurt a person)?
How is social class determined in America and in other places in the world?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Things Fall Apart
Rating

In our lives, we are constantly telling stories to ourselves and to others in an attempt to both understand our experiences and present our best selves to others.  But how do we tell a story about ourselves that is both true and positive? How do we hold ourselves up in the best possible light, while still being honest about our struggles and our flaws? Students will explore ways of interpreting and portraying personal experiences.  They'll read Chinua Achebe's novel Things Fall Apart , analyzing the text through the eyes of one character. They'll get to know that character's flaws and strengths, and they'll tell part of the story from that character's perspective, doing their best to tell an honest tale that presents their character's best side. Then they'll explore their own stories, crafting a personal narrative about an important moment of learning in his or her life.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and analyze Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart , viewing the events and conflicts of the novel through the eyes of one of the central characters.
Students write a two-part narrative project: one narrative told through their character’s perspective and one personal narrative about an incident in their own life.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How do our conflicts shape and show our character?
How can we tell a story about ourselves that’s both honest and positive?
How do definitions of justice change depending on the culture you live in?
What are ways individuals can react to a changing world? To a community that doesn’t accept us?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Things Fall Apart, The Big Questions, Analyzing The Umuofian Society
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Does being part of a community mean that you accept the values and customs of that community? In this lesson, students will begin to analyze what they know about Umuofian society, and try to figure out how various characters feel about its customs.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Global Nomads Group: Anti-Bullying Curriculum (One Week Lesson Plan)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Bullying is a widespread problem among our schools and communities that can lead to increased fighting and violent futures for both the victims and bullies themselves. How can youth change these statistics and contribute to a positive school environment?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Global Nomads Group (GNG)
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Global Nomads Group: Barriers to Access Education with Girl Rising Executive Producer, Tom Yellin (One Week Lesson Plan)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Highlighting the film, Girl Rising, this curriculum seeks to examine the barriers that prevent children, specifically girls, from accessing education. The curriculum engages students in a critical discussion of: "How do we, as youth, create solutions to overcome the challenges of access to education?"

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Interactive
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Student Guide
Author:
Global Nomads Group (GNG)
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Global Nomads Group: Education and Social Change in Afghanistan Curriculum with Journalist, Mellissa Fung (One Week Lesson Plan)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

With a focus on education in Afghanistan, the Witness to Education in Afghanistan and Throughout the World curriculum examines global and local examples of how education can be use to create social change. Students address the driving question: "How can we, as youth, utilize education to promote positive change within our communities?"

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Interactive
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Student Guide
Author:
Global Nomads Group (GNG)
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Global Nomads Group: Human Trafficking Curriculum (One Week Lesson Plan)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Often compared to modern day slavery, human trafficking has become one of the world's largest hidden criminal industries. How do we, as youth, combat all forms of human trafficking?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Global Nomads Group (GNG)
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Global Nomads Group: Media Literacy Curriculum (5 day workshop)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This 5-day curriculum teaches digital storytelling and media literacy skills through engaging youth to think critically on issues relevant to their life and future. This unit is guided by the question, "How does media contribute to positive social change?”

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Student Guide
Author:
Global Nomads Group (GNG)
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Global Nomads Group: Project Based Learning: Environmental Innovation Project Guide
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

The TechCamps Collaborative Innovation Project Guidebook leads students through activities that help peers collaborate and define a challenge in their own local or global communities. Then, develop a project that addresses a chosen issue by promoting positive change and community engagement.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Global Nomads Group (GNG)
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Global Nomads Group: Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle Waste Curriculum With Thad Copeland from GrowNYC (One Week Lesson Plan)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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The Wasted: Don't Trash the Earth curriculum asks students to examine the impact of the waste we locally and globally produce and seek creative solutions to reduce this wastefulness by answering the driving question: "How can we, as youth, rethink waste?"

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Interactive
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Student Guide
Author:
Global Nomads Group (GNG)
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Global Nomads Group: Rwanda Media Curriculum (One Week Lesson Plan)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

How do we, as youth, learn from the conflict in Rwanda to strengthen media access and quality in our own communities? In this program, students will explore the role of the media in Rwanda, before, during, and after the genocide and explore how to expand media access, quality, and equity in their communities and around the world.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Global Nomads Group (GNG)
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Global Nomads Group: Social Change Curriculum (One Week Lesson Plan)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Social change, at its core, does not come from one event or incident, but the long, sustained work of individuals and groups in numerous sectors of society. How do we, as youth, participate in sustaining positive social change in our communities?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Global Nomads Group (GNG)
Date Added:
01/28/2016
How is Young Adulthood Changing?
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

The teacher will facilitate a class discussion for students to share their opinions about young adulthood before they start the activity. After some teacher modeling, students will read, annotate, and answer questions about a technical document—including tables and graphs—to gather evidence to support conversations with their classmates about young adulthood. Then, students will write a paragraph about how their generation defines young adulthood.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
10/18/2019
The Importance of Voice
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

Within this series of lessons, students will explore these essential questions:
What basic human necessities are needed to thrive in society?
How do we measure wealth?
How to move from oppression to resiliency?
How to move from oppression to social change?
Students will examine the extent to which people pass judgment, discriminate and violate human rights in communities of color and to what extent these same communities remain resilient. Students will learn and apply their knowledge of non-violent communication to increase self awareness, school and career readiness skills in the social-emotional domain, and develop an understanding about their bio-reactions. Students will research and analyze strengths and challenges within their community. They will then identify a need and develop action steps to meet that need. We will move our instruction from broad to personal perspectives of understanding the conditions in the larger world as well as their own. By moving from the global/community perspective into the relational/historical experience and end with their personal perspective, students will develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of themselves within time and space.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
History
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Lauri Clausen
Alicia Garcia
Aaron Grant III
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Introduction to Sociology 2e
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Introduction to Sociology 2e adheres to the scope and sequence of a typical, one-semester introductory sociology course. It offers comprehensive coverage of core concepts, foundational scholars, and emerging theories, which are supported by a wealth of engaging learning materials. The textbook presents detailed section reviews with rich questions, discussions that help students apply their knowledge, and features that draw learners into the discipline in meaningful ways. The second edition retains the book’s conceptual organization, aligning to most courses, and has been significantly updated to reflect the latest research and provide examples most relevant to today’s students. In order to help instructors transition to the revised version, the 2e changes are described within the preface.

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
02/01/2012