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Brain is a Computer
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Students learn about the similarities between the human brain and its engineering counterpart, the computer. Since students work with computers routinely, this comparison strengthens their understanding of both how the brain works and how it parallels that of a computer. Students are also introduced to the "stimulus-sensor-coordinator-effector-response" framework for understanding human and robot actions.

Subject:
Computer Science
Engineering
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Charlie Franklin
Sachin Nair
Satish Nair
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Chemistry Online Resource Essentials: Chapter 5 Moles, Molarity, Reaction Types
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Remix and Share
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This collection of videos, animations and documents comes from the NCSSM AP chemistry online course. Chapter five provides practice and demonstrations related to moles, molarity, and reaction types in chemistry.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Simulation
Provider:
North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics
Provider Set:
Chemistry Online Resource Essentials
Date Added:
01/01/2002
Fields, Forces and Flows in Biological Systems, Spring 2007
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This course introduces the basic driving forces for electric current, fluid flow, and mass transport, plus their application to a variety of biological systems. Basic mathematical and engineering tools will be introduced, in the context of biology and physiology. Various electrokinetic phenomena are also considered as an example of coupled nature of chemical-electro-mechanical driving forces. Applications include transport in biological tissues and across membranes, manipulation of cells and biomolecules, and microfluidics.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Han, Jongyoon (Jay)
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Get Close to a Nuclear Fission Reaction!
Conditions of Use:
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Learn how scientists regulate a nuclear reactor in this animation-enhanced essay from the FRONTLINE Web site. ***Access to Teacher's Domain content now requires free login to PBS Learning Media.

Subject:
Engineering
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Teachers' Domain
Author:
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
01/29/2004
Newton Gets Me Moving
Conditions of Use:
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In this lesson, students will explore motion, rockets and rocket motion while assisting Spacewoman Tess, Spaceman Rohan and Maya in their explorations. They will first learn some basic facts about vehicles, rockets and why we use them. Then, the students will discover that the motion of all objects including the flight of a rocket and movement of a canoe is governed by Newton's three laws of motion.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Brian Argrow
Geoffrey Hill
Janet Yowell
Jay Shah
Jeff White
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Newton Rocket Car
Conditions of Use:
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The purpose of this activity is to demonstrate Newton's third law of motion which states that every action has an equal and opposite reaction through a small wooden car. The Newton cars show how action/reaction works and how the mass of a moving object affects the acceleration and force of the system. Subsequently, the Newton cars provide students with an excellent analogy for how rockets actually work.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Brian Argrow
Geoffrey Hill
Janet Yowell
Jay Shah
Jeff White
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Nuclear Reaction: Fission
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

This video segment adapted from FRONTLINE looks at nuclear fission as an energy source that can be used to generate electricity. ***Access to Teacher's Domain content now requires free login to PBS Learning Media.

Subject:
Engineering
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Teachers' Domain
Author:
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2004
Organic Chemistry II, Fall 2006
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Intermediate organic chemistry. Synthesis, structure determination, mechanism, and the relationships between structure and reactivity emphasized. Special topics in organic chemistry included to illustrate the role of organic chemistry in biological systems and in the chemical industry.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jamison, Timothy
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Pupillary Response & Test Your Reaction Time
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Students observe and test their reflexes, including the (involuntary) pupillary response and (voluntary) reaction times using their dominant and non-dominant hands, as a way to further explore how reflexes occur in humans. They gain insights into how our bodies react to stimuli, and how some reactions and body movements are controlled automatically, without conscious thought. Using information from the associated lesson about how robots react to situations, including the stimulus-to-response framework, students see how engineers use human reflexes as examples for controls for robots.

Subject:
Engineering
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Charlie Franklin
Marianne Catanho
Sachin Nair
Satish Nair
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Reactants, Products and Leftovers
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Create your own sandwich and then see how many sandwiches you can make with different amounts of ingredients. Do the same with chemical reactions. See how many products you can make with different amounts of reactants. Play a game to test your understanding of reactants, products and leftovers. Can you get a perfect score on each level?

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
ChemEd DL
Chris Malley
Kathy Perkins
Kelly Lancaster
Patricia Loeblein
Robert Parson
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
03/01/2010
Reaction Exposed: The Big Chill!
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Students investigate the endothermic reaction involving citric acid, sodium bicarbonate and water to produce carbon dioxide, water and sodium citrate. In the presence of water [H2O], citric acid [C6H8O7] and sodium bicarbonate [NaHCO3] (also known as baking soda) react to form sodium citrate [Na3C6H5O7], water [H2O], and carbon dioxide [CO2]. Students test a stoichiometric version of the reaction followed by testing various perturbations on the stoichiometric version in which each reactant (citric acid, sodium bicarbonate, and water) is strategically doubled or halved to create a matrix of the effect on the reaction. By analyzing the test matrix data, they determine the optimum quantities to use in their own production companies to minimize material cost and maximize CO2 production. They use their test data to "scale-up" the system from a quart-sized ziplock bag to a reaction tank equal to the volume of their classroom. They collect data on reaction temperature and CO2 production.

Subject:
Engineering
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Courtney Bonuccelli
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Reactions & Rates
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Explore what makes a reaction happen by colliding atoms and molecules. Design experiments with different reactions, concentrations, and temperatures. When are reactions reversible? What affects the rate of a reaction?

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Kathy Perkins
Linda Koch
Mindy Gratny
Ron LeMaster
Trish Loeblein
Date Added:
11/15/2007
Reflecting on Human Reflexes
Conditions of Use:
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Students learn about human reflexes, how our bodies react to stimuli and how some body reactions and movements are controlled automatically, without thinking consciously about the movement or responses. In the associated activity, students explore how reflexes work in the human body by observing an involuntary human reflex and testing their own reaction times using dominant and non-dominant hands. Once students understand the stimulus-to-response framework components as a way to describe human reflexes and reactions in certain situations, they connect this knowledge to how robots can be programmed to conduct similar reactions.

Subject:
Engineering
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Charlie Franklin
Marianne Catanho
Sachin Nair
Satish Nair
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Reversible Reactions
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Watch a reaction proceed over time. How does total energy affect a reaction rate? Vary temperature, barrier height, and potential energies. Record concentrations and time in order to extract rate coefficients. Do temperature dependent studies to extract Arrhenius parameters. This simulation is best used with teacher guidance because it presents an analogy of chemical reactions.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Jack Barbera
Linda Koch
Ron LeMaster
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
09/01/2005
Reversible Reactions (AR)
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

Watch a reaction proceed over time. How does total energy affect a reaction rate? Vary temperature, barrier height, and potential energies. Record concentrations and time in order to extract rate coefficients. Do temperature dependent studies to extract Arrhenius parameters. This simulation is best used with teacher guidance because it presents an analogy of chemical reactions.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Jack Barbera
Linda Koch
Ron LeMaster
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
09/02/2009
Simple Rocket Science and Statistics
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Students will determine whether the amount of air in a balloon changes the distance it will travel on a fishing line. They will collect data from multiple tests and then create a graph to visualize the variation.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Simulation
Author:
Paula Cecil
Date Added:
04/04/2019
That's Hot! Robot Brain Programming
Conditions of Use:
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With the challenge to program computers to mimic the human reaction after touching a hot object, students program LEGO® robots to "react" and move back quickly once their touch sensors bump into something. By relating human senses to electronic sensors used in robots, students see the similarities between the human brain and its engineering counterpart, the computer, and come to better understand the functioning of sensors in both applications. They apply an understanding of the human "stimulus-sensor-coordinator-effector-response" framework to logically understand human and robot actions.

Subject:
Engineering
Electronic Technology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Charlie Franklin
Sachin Nair
Satish Nair
Date Added:
09/18/2014