Updating search results...

Search Resources

80 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • Race
The 1992 L.A. Civil Unrest
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Sparked off by the acquittal of four officers in the Rodney King police brutality case, the 1992 Los Angeles Civil Unrest took place over several days and led to rioting and destruction of the city. The unrest represented a boiling point of underlying issues including systemic racism, police brutality, failure of the criminal justice system, economic disparities between communities of color, and racial tensions. The perceived racial tensions between Korean and Black Americans, further complicated by the shooting of Latasha Harlins by a Korean storeowner, led to some targeting of Korean American neighborhoods/businesses for violence and looting. Students will explore the history, conditions, and tensions that led to the 1992 civil unrest in L.A.

2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies:
Civics and Government: 5.1, 6.4, 7.5, 8.6, 8.8, 8.9, HS.2, HS.9, HS.11
Economics: 7.8
Geography: 5.13, HS.42, HS.51
Historical Knowledge: 5.22, 6.20, 6.21, 8.22, 8.25, HS.52, HS.53, HS.61, HS.64, HS.65
Historical Thinking: 5.25, 6.23, 7.25, 8.30, 8.31, 8.32, HS.68
Social Science Analysis: 5.26, 5.27, 5.28, 6.24, 6.26, 6.27, 7.27, 7.29, 8.33, 8.34, 8.36, HS.72, HS.73, HS.74, HS.75, HS.76, HS.78

Subject:
English Language Arts
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
The Asian American Education Project
Date Added:
02/01/2023
19th Century Immigration - Causes & Effects
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

Students will examine and interpret a population chart published in 1898 — depicting changes in the makeup of the United States across time in three categories, “foreign stock,” “native stock,” and “colored” — as well as an 1893 political cartoon about immigration. Students will also explain the causes and effects of population change in the late 19th century.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
10/18/2019
ANTH 106 American Mosaic
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

In this class, we will explore America's diversity through questions of immigration, race, gender/sexuality and class--some of the major ways our culture is organized. It is comprised of 9 lessons based on online resources, plus 2 auto-ethnography assignments. This class was originally taught by Huma Mohibullah at Renton Technical College. 

Subject:
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Higher Education
U.S. History
Anthropology
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Module
Reading
Author:
Di Zhang
Youth High School Completion Renton Techincal College
Date Added:
05/23/2022
The American Dream and Social Stratification Lesson Unit
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Students who migrated to the USA from Mexico or any other country when they were kids are the learner audience. However, this lesson series can be adapted for other types of learners. Each lesson will take up to 30 minutes. The topic of lesson #1 is social stratification and the American dream. The students will learn about these two concepts. The goals of lesson #2 are to learn how to create charts and graphs in a PowerPoint after collecting data through interviews and compare/ contrast results with National Survey 2005 NY Times. Lesson #3’s topic is about race as ascribed characteristics and its influence on social mobility. Students will integrate and evaluate information they collected and present their own ideas in discussions. Lesson #4’s topic is how gender can affect people’s ability to climb the economic ladder. During lesson #5 students will present their findings in class and reflect on their experience learning about the topic of the American dream and whether it is achievable or not.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Data Set
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Author:
Nadezda Pimenova
Date Added:
05/14/2016
Analyzing Grammar Pet Peeves
Read the Fine Print
Some Rights Reserved
Rating
0.0 stars

By analyzing Dear Abby's rant about bad grammar usage, students become aware that attitudes about race, social class, moral and ethical character, and "proper" language use are intertwined.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
09/25/2013
The Anthropology of Biology
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course applies the tools of anthropology to examine biology in the age of genomics, biotechnological enterprise, biodiversity conservation, pharmaceutical bioprospecting, and synthetic biology. It examines such social concerns such as bioterrorism, genetic modification, and cloning. It offers an anthropological inquiry into how the substances and explanations of biology—ecological, organismic, cellular, molecular, genetic, informatic—are changing. It examines such artifacts as cell lines, biodiversity databases, and artificial life models, and using primary sources in biology, social studies of the life sciences, and literary and cinematic materials, and asks how we might answer Erwin Schrodinger’s 1944 question, “What Is Life?” today.

Subject:
Biology
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Stefan Helmreich
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Anti-Racism
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

This module offers a communication studies perspective on anti-racism.Students who complete this module will 1) Think about how we ought to talk about race. 2) Learn about the social construction of race. 3) Listen to conversations about race. 4) Take part in conversations about race.[Title page image description: White, stenciled letters against a black background that appears to be smeared with white paint read, "STOP RACISM."]

Subject:
Communication
Ethnic Studies
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jessica Hughes
Date Added:
07/28/2022
An Approach to Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

This unit introduces instructional moves for how teachers can use their classroom libraries for deep critical thinking on issues of race, racism, and inequality. This unit uses a middle school level novel Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry (Taylor, 1976), but the content objectives, teaching strategies, and activities are applicable to any novel study. Building upon how classroom libraries function as resources for thought provoking literature and discussions from the 2019 Yale Teachers Institute Seminar Teaching about Race and Racism Across the Disciplines, this unit primarily explores the historical context of the novel primarily using the language of music to analyze characters. Students will develop interpretations about how these conditions influenced characters’ traits, roles, or conflicts and construct a central thesis on a character of their choice. It incorporates pedagogical tools and resources expanding curricular strategies and provides a framework for student discussion beyond the text on issues about race, racism, and forms of inequality.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2019 Curriculum Units Volume II
Date Added:
08/01/2019
Attitudes about Racial Discrimination and Racial Inequality in the US: A Data-Driven Learning Guide
Read the Fine Print
Some Rights Reserved
Rating
0.0 stars

The goal of this module is to explore White and Black Americans' attitudes about racial discrimination and racial inequality. Crosstabulation will be used.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
TeachingWithData.org
Provider Set:
TeachingWithData.org
Author:
ICPSR
Date Added:
11/07/2014
"Because the Country Says They Have to Change"
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The shift from apartheid to a constitutional democracy in South Africa brought with it a plethora of questions concerning ideas of nationhood, citizenship, and organisational transformation. Integrally caught up in the revolution, the South African Police Service (SAPS) faces transformative challenges on scales far larger than most other organisations in the country. From being the strong arm of the oppressive elite, it has had to restructure and rearticulate its function, while simultaneously attempting to maintain law and order. Like many other corporations and organisations, the SAPS has engaged in interventions aimed at aiding the fluidity of this process. This report is an analysis of one such intervention. It attempts to ascertain the extent to which members are changing as a result of particular diversity workshops conducted in a region of the Western Cape. The analysis focuses on members at one particular station.

Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
University of Cape Town
Author:
Andrew
Faull
Date Added:
01/23/2012
Breakfast Relay (2nd - 3rd Grade) Agricultural STEM Activity
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson pairs with the book "Pancakes, Pancakes!" by Eric Carle. First read this story and then run the breakfast relay outlined in this lesson.

NGSS: K-ESS3-3

CCSS: SL.K.3

Social Sciences: K.10, K.17, 1.12, 3.12, 5.11, 4.18

Time: 30 minutes

Materials: "Pancakes, Pancakes!" by Eric Carle, food cards and bags labeled: earth, farm, store, factory.

Subject:
Agriculture
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
Columbia Gorge STEM Hub
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Brick by Brick: Exploring and Archiving the History of the City of Newark
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

This unit focuses on underreported stories of migration and the local history of everyday people of the City of Newark. From the global stories of women migrants on the move to the wards of the City of Newark, we will examine the experiences of the people who live and inhabit these places and spaces, and who also make history.

Far too often we solely focus on major reported stories related to migration from the point of view of the elite, those in power, or the victors who wrote down their version of history for posterity. This unit seeks to reclaim history for those who resisted, suffered, lost yet triumphed. Anchored by Pulitzer Center migration resources, this unit explores the intersection of the history of the City of Newark (aka Brick City) and global migration using a variety of historical documents, texts, and visuals in which everyday people and the disenfranchised occupy an important space of representation.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pulitzer Center
Author:
Jazmin Puicon
Date Added:
06/24/2021
Changing Demographics: What Can We Do to Promote Respect?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson is part of a series called “Changing Demographics, Changing Identity, Changing Attitudes” The series focuses on how the American identity has and will continue to change as we move toward a plurality nation, how the nation responds to that evolving identity, how changing demographics relate to issues of equality, and what we can do to promote respect for all people living in the United States.

In this lesson, students consider actions we can take to promote respect and ensure equality for all people living in the United States.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
11/30/2016
Chinese Exclusion Act
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

Starting with the Gold Rush, Chinese migrated to California and other regions of the United States in search of work. As several photographs show, many Chinese found work in the gold mines and on the railroads. They accepted $32.50 a month to work on the Union Pacific in Wyoming in 1870 for the same job that paid white workers $52 a month. This led to deep resentment by the whites, who felt the Chinese were competing unfairly for jobs. White labor unions blamed the Chinese for lower wages and lack of jobs, and anti-Chinese feelings grew. The cartoon "You Know How It Is Yourself" expresses this sentiment. Several political cartoons in this topic are graphic representations of racism and conflicts between whites and Chinese. "Won't They Remain Here in Spite of the New Constitution?" shows a demonized figure of political corruption protecting Chinese cheap labor, dirty politicians, capital, and financiers. "The Tables Turned" shows Denis Kearney (head of the Workingman's Party of California, a union that had criticized Chinese laborers) in jail, being taunted by Chinese men. In 1880, President Rutherford B. Hayes signed the Chinese Exclusion Treaty, which placed strict limitations on the number of Chinese allowed to enter the United States and the number allowed to become naturalized citizens. In 1882, Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which prohibited immigration from China (The Act was not repealed until 1943). The two-part cartoon from the July-December 1882 issue of The Wasp reflects how some citizens saw the situation. After the Act was passed, anti-Chinese violence increased. One illustration depicts the Rock Springs Massacre of 1885, a Wyoming race riot in which 28 Chinese were killed by British and Swedish miners. The "Certificate of Residence" document illustrates that Chinese individuals were required to prove their residence in the United States prior to the passage of the Exclusion Act. The poster offering a reward for Wong Yuk, a Chinese man, makes it clear that the United States was actively deporting Chinese. Despite discrimination and prejudice, this first wave of immigrants established thriving communities. Photographs taken in San Francisco's Chinatown show prosperous businesses, such as the "Chinese Butcher and Grocery Shop." Wealthy merchants formed active business associations, represented by the image "Officers of the Chinese Six Companies." The Chinese celebrated their heritage by holding cultural festivals, as shown in the photograph from 1896. The photographs "Children of High Class," "Golden Gate Park," and "Chinese Passengers on Ferry" are evidence that some Chinese adopted Western-style clothing while others wore more traditional attire.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
University of California
Provider Set:
Calisphere - California Digital Library
Date Added:
04/25/2013
Chinese Exclusion Act and the Exclusion of Asians, Pacific Islanders & Chinese Women
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Signed on May 6th, 1882 by President Chester A. Arthur, the Chinese Exclusion Act was the first law to explicitly limit immigration based on race. This lesson is designed to go further in exploring the causes and effects of the Chinese Exclusion Act through analysis of primary and secondary sources. The purpose is to showcase the conditions in the US that led to a rise in xenophobia, and in turn, race-based policies that defined the Chinese American and Asian American experience in the United States. The lesson will also have students engage in critical thinking through research and a class discussion comparing and contrasting the Chinese Exclusion Act and current immigration policies or proposed immigration policies.

2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies:
Civics and Government: 5.1, 6.4, 7.5, 8.7, 8.8, HS.1, HS.2, HS.9, HS.10
Economics: 7.8
Geography: 5.13, HS.51
Historical Knowledge: 5.22, 6.20, 6.21, 8.22, 8.25, HS.52, HS.64
Historical Thinking: 7.25, 8.31, HS.68
Social Science Analysis: 5.26, 5.27, 6.24, 6.26, 8.34, 8.36, HS.72, HS.73, HS.74

Subject:
English Language Arts
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
The Asian American Education Project
Date Added:
02/02/2023
The Confusion of Identity Exploration in Middle School
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

This 6th Grade literacy unit focuses on the Required Core Novel The Skin I’m In , by Sharon G. Flake. This unit explores the confusing journey to finding identity as a middle school aged student. The complex identities of five characters from the novel, Maleeka, Char, Mrs. Saunders, Caleb and John-John, are analyzed with multiple supplemental texts. The project for the students includes a daily “Identity Journal,” in which they analyze the characters using text evidence from both the novel and supplemental texts, and then compare these with what they are feeling or seeing within themselves. The unit culminates with a drawing of the student alongside the character the most identify with. Students present their journals with the drawings.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume II
Date Added:
08/01/2016
“A Dangerous Unselfishness”: Understanding and Teaching the Complex History of Blackface
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

When the news story broke that Virginia Governor Ralph Northam and other politicians wore blackface and Klan regalia while in school, institutions across the nation suddenly were confronted with their all too recent blackface past. Princeton Professor Rhae Lynn Barnes, the foremost expert on amateur blackface minstrelsy, has spent over a decade cataloging 10,000 minstrel plays and uncovered their prolific use on Broadway, in schools, the military, churches, political organizations, and even the White House. This webinar will help educators master the basic history of blackface in America, strategies to discuss this difficult topic with students, and ways to think about the incredible social, political, and economic power blackface held as America’s most pervasive entertainment form in the American North and West between the American Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement. By the end of this webinar, educators will be able to teach what a minstrel show was, how the genre developed, who participated in this form, how it was central to mass popular entertainment globally, they will be able to teach the construction of key stereotypes for minorities and women, and how it was pushed underground through a coordinated Civil Rights campaign after being openly celebrated for over a century.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Primary Source
Author:
National Humanities Center
Rhae Lynn Barnes
Date Added:
10/29/2019
Deepening Your Understanding of Race and Racism
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Explore the role media plays in our understanding of race and racism. Hear from experts who share advice on how educators can use media to confront injustice, and create anti-racist classroom environments.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Author:
PBS Learning Media
Date Added:
01/31/2023
Democracy in difference: Debating key terms of gender, sexuality, race and identity
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Democracy in difference: Debating key terms of gender, sexuality, race and identity focuses on concepts and analytical frames we use when discussing how marginalised identities navigate their place in an assumed common culture.

This ebook offers a path for exploring how we might build a shared vocabulary when working through the muddle of public debates like identity politics, political correctness, pronouns and what constitutes racism. Democracy in Difference is an unconventional interdisciplinary guide to key concepts, which borrows from decolonial methodologies, Marxism, feminism, queer theory and deconstruction.

Key terms are illustrated through written text, La Trobe Art Institute artworks (centering Indigenous artists), poetry, comedy and song, and customised animations which make difficult terms accessible.

This text is published by the La Trobe eBureau.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Social Science
Ethnic Studies
Political Science
Sociology
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Textbook
Author:
Carolyn D'Cruz
Date Added:
08/22/2022
Discovering My Identity
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students will describe aspects of their identities such as race, gender, class, age, ability, religion and more. They will watch two video clips featuring Marley Dias, an eleven-year-old girl who started the #1000BlackGirlBooks campaign, a book drive with the goal of collecting 1,000 books featuring African-American girls. After learning about the campaign, students will review illustrated books in their classroom and school library and analyze whether the characters in the books reflect their own identities or the identities of their families and friends. Finally, students will write a book review on one of the books and examine how the book’s characters are similar to or different from them.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
11/28/2016