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  • Population Growth
21a. The Importance of the West
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The Louisiana Purchase of 1803 intensified American migration to the west that was already well underway. Anglo-American settlement in the 18th century had largely been confined to the eastern seaboard. It made its boldest inroads where rivers allowed easy internal transportation. As a result the chief population centers of early North America were clustered on the coast or along its major inland waterways.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
Cellular Respiration and Population Growth
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Two lessons and their associated activities explore cellular respiration and population growth in yeasts. Yeast cells are readily obtained and behave predictably, so they are very appropriate to use in middle school classrooms. In the first lesson, students are introduced to yeast respiration through its role in the production of bread and alcoholic beverages. A discussion of the effects of alcohol on the human body is used both as an attention-getting device, and as a means to convey important information at an impressionable age. In the associated activity, students set up a simple way to indirectly observe and quantify the amount of respiration occurring in yeast-molasses cultures. Based on questions that arise from this activity, in the second lesson students work in small groups as they design and execute their own experiments to determine how environmental factors affect yeast population growth.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mary R. Hebrank
Date Added:
01/31/2007
Developmental Entrepreneurship, Fall 2003
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This class surveys developmental entrepreneurship via case examples of both successful and failed businesses and generally grapples with deploying and diffusing products and services through entrepreneurial action. By drawing on live and historical cases, especially from South Asia, Africa, Latin America as well as Eastern Europe, China, and other developing regions, we seek to cover the broad spectrum of challenges and opportunities facing developmental entrepreneurs. Finally, we explore a range of established and emerging business models as well as new business opportunities enabled by developmental technologies developed in MIT labs and beyond.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Management
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Barahona-Martinez, Juan Carlos
Bonsen, Joost
Pentland, Alex Paul
Quadir, Iqbal
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Ecology and Environment
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In this module you will learn how organisms interact with one another and how they interact with the environment. Key ecological concepts in the organisation of organisms, population growth and community dynamics which are important components of pre-university ecology curriculum will be also covered. The module is tailored for delivery using ICT and on completion you will be ready to design relevant courses in ecology and to undertake further studies in environmental sciences.

Subject:
Ecology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
African Virtual University
Provider Set:
OER@AVU
Author:
John Kioroga Mworia
Date Added:
02/27/2018
Feral Cat Control
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This activity is structured as a letter from a company seeking assistance with a mathematical problem. The students will act as professional mathematical consultants and write a report analyzing the client's problem. The client company is a fictional organization which advocates for the use of trap-neuter-return (TNR) as a control method for feral cat colonies. The students will utilize modified exponential growth models to analyze the efficacy of TNR compared to a euthanasia program.

Subject:
Applied Science
Life Science
Mathematics
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Module
Author:
Nathan Pennington
Rachel L. Bayless
Date Added:
04/01/2017
Food and the Future Environment
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

The Future of Food is an introductory-level science course that emphasizes the challenges facing food systems in the 21st century, and issues of sustainability for agriculture and other food production activities, as well as the challenges posed by food insecurity and modern diets to human health and well-being. Topics covered include introduction to the coupled-system perspective, historical development of food systems, socioeconomic aspects of the food system, interaction of the food system with the Earth's environment including soil, water, biota and climate, and the future of the food system considering potential changes such as in climate, urbanization, and demography.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Biology
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http
Penn State University
Provider Set:
// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Heather Karsten
Steven Vanek
Date Added:
10/07/2019
Frontiers of Knowledge: Global Warming, The Population Connection
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Dr. Joseph Bookstein argues that the real cause of global warming is not the burning of fossil fuels but rather the needs and wants of the global human population, now over 6.6 billion. He discusses methods, feasibility, and implementation strategies for voluntary population reduction. (52 minutes)

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
U.C. San Diego
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
08/19/2011
How to Make Yeast Cells Thrive
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students set up and run the experiments they designed in the Population Growth in Yeasts associated lesson, using simple yeast-molasses cultures in test tubes. Population growth is indicated by the amount of respiration occurring in the cultures, which in turn is indicated by the growth of carbon dioxide bubbles trapped within the culture tubes. Using this method, students test for a variety of environmental influences, such as temperature, food supply and pH.

Subject:
Engineering
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mary R. Hebrank
Date Added:
10/14/2015
How to feed the world by 2050: Actions in a changing climate
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

To achieve food security in a changing climate, the global community must operate within three limits: the quantity of food that can be produced under a given climate; the quantity needed by a growing and changing population; and the effect of food production on the climate. At present the planet operates outside that safe space, as witnessed by the enormous number of people who are undernourished. If current trends in population growth, diets, crop yields and climate change continue, the world will still be outside this ̢ĺŰĺ÷safe operating space̢ĺŰĺŞ in 2050. Humanity must urgently work to enlarge the safe space and also move the planet into the safe space (film credit: Commission on Sustainable Agriculture and Climate Change, an initiative of the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security, in collaboration with University of Minnesota Global Landscapes Initiative).

Subject:
Film and Music Production
Nutrition
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
International Livestock Research Institute
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
03/28/2012
I Feel Renewed!
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this activity, students will simulate the equal and unequal distribution of our renewable resources. Also, they will consider the impact of our increasing population upon these resources and how engineers develop technologies to create resources.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Amy Kolenbrander
Janet Yowell
Jessica Todd
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
10/14/2015
An Introduction to Global Health - Population (8:39)
Rating

You must know the basic facts about the world population in order to grasp global health. You
need to know where people live in this world, how the world population is changing based on
the number of babies born per woman, on average, in the world as a whole and in the
different regions. And finally, you must learn how, why, and when the fast population growth in the world will
come to an end during this century. Please look at this video with five video clips where this is explained. And if something is surprising to you, please look twice.
Get transcript for video here: https://www.oercommons.org/courseware/module/58789/overview

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Karolinska Institutet
Provider Set:
An Introduction to Global health
Author:
Professor Hans Rosling
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Population Explosion
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Many factors influence the success and survival rate of a population of living things. Explore several factors that can determine the survival of a population of sheep in this NetLogo model. Start with a model of unlimited grass available to the sheep and watch what happens to the sheep population! Next try to keep the population under control by removing sheep periodically. Change the birthrate, grass regrowth rate, and the amount of energy rabbits get from the grass to keep a stable population.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
01/13/2012
Population Growth in Yeasts
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This lesson is the second of two that explore cellular respiration and population growth in yeasts. In the first lesson, students set up a simple way to indirectly observe and quantify the amount of respiration occurring in yeast-molasses cultures. Based on questions that arose during the first lesson and its associated activity, in this lesson students work in small groups to design experiments that will determine how environmental factors affect yeast population growth.

Subject:
Engineering
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mary R. Hebrank
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Principles of Evolution, Ecology and Behavior
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This course presents the principles of evolution, ecology, and behavior for students beginning their study of biology and of the environment. It discusses major ideas and results in a manner accessible to all Yale College undergraduates. Recent advances have energized these fields with results that have implications well beyond their boundaries: ideas, mechanisms, and processes that should form part of the toolkit of all biologists and educated citizens.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Biology
Ecology
Genetics
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Date Added:
02/16/2011
SLASL: Relationships between differential equations, population dynamics, and global climate change
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This unit includes 5 lessons that culminates in a persuasive argument in the form of letter to congressional member or grant proposal to Duke Energy.

Using inquiry-based reading, students will explore an anchor text and then develop their own supporting questions to guide their research.

Subject:
Education
Life Science
Mathematics
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Christina Segura
Brian Smith
Jeanne Cooper
Date Added:
10/26/2017
Urban Ecosystems 3: Cities as Population Centers
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The purpose of this lesson is understand that throughout history cities have been centers of population, but that the size and number of modern urban ecosystems is unprecedented. To understand that human exploitation of fossil fuels was key to the growth of large cities worldwide.

This lesson was developed by Dr. Penny Firth, a scientist, as part of a set of interdisciplinary Science NetLinks lessons aimed at improved understanding of environmental phenomena and events. This is the third of a strand of five lessons.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Ecology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Author:
Dr. Penny Firth
Date Added:
09/17/2013
The Virtual Ecosystem
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This activity introduces students to the idea that all living organisms must compete for food. Students control a rabbit in a field with edible plants, at first alone, and later joined by computer-controlled rabbits. With such competition it becomes harder and harder for the students to keep their rabbit alive. Students shift their thinking from a focus on individual organisms to a concern for the well-being of the population as a whole. (Evolution Readiness Activity 6 of 10.)

Subject:
Education
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
The National Science Foundation
Date Added:
12/11/2011