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The Albumen Print - Photographic Processes Series - Chapter 6 of 12
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The albumen silver print, invented in 1850, was the most popular photographic printing process of the 19th century. To make albumen silver prints, a sheet of paper is coated with albumen (egg white) and salts, then sensitized with a solution of silver nitrate. The paper is exposed in contact with a negative and printed out, which means that the image is created solely by the action of light on the sensitized paper without any chemical development. Because the paper is coated with albumen, the silver image is suspended on the surface of the paper rather than absorbed into the paper fibers. The result is a sharp image with fine detail on a smooth, glossy surface. This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services, grant number MA-10-13-0194.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
George Eastman Museum
Author:
George Eastman Museum
Date Added:
07/29/2021
Analytical Essay - The Pictures Generation and the Selfie
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The focus of this lesson is to provide reading material and strategies for idea development for an analytical essay. The reading will be based on the article “The ‘Pictures Generation” and students will be also asked to select a selfie image of themselves or of another person. The class discussion will foster a community of idea sharing which will translate well as supporting points in response to the writing prompt which will be given to students.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Alexandra Della Fera
Date Added:
09/20/2017
Arabic 102 - Lab 07 (Hobbies | هوايتي )
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Description:In this activity, students will practice discussing their hobbies, likes, and dislikes. They will be able to describe their daily activities. Students will also be able to discuss the preferences they have about their daily activities. Students will learn to ask others questions about their schedules and daily activities. NCSSFL-ACTFL Can-Do Statements:I can ask and answer questions about my hobbies.I can talk to someone about their hobbies.I can talk about my likes and dislikes.

Subject:
Languages
World Cultures
Language Education (ESL)
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Blake Simmerman
Amber Hoye
Date Added:
11/06/2020
Art Appreciation and Techniques
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CC BY
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5.0 stars

This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history and in depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative processes and thought. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: interpret examples of visual art using a five-step critical process that includes description, analysis, context, meaning, and judgment; identify and describe the elements and principles of art; use analytical skills to connect formal attributes of art with their meaning and expression; explain the role and effect of the visual arts in societies, history, and other world cultures; articulate the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic themes and issues that artists examine in their work; identify the processes and materials involved in art and architectural production; utilize information to locate, evaluate, and communicate information about visual art in its various forms. Note that this course is an alternative to the Saylor FoundationĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s ARTH101A and has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Art History 101B)

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/16/2012
Art Frees the Soul: Sixth Street Photography Workshop
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SPARK follows photographers from the Sixth Street Photography Workshop as they take pictures of their lives and ideas in some of San Francisco's most depressed neighborhoods. This Educator Guide is about the history of photography.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
KQED Education
Provider Set:
KQED Education Network
Date Added:
07/07/2004
The Art and Accessibility of Music (Advanced Level)
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CC BY
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Students will learn about the jazz singer Billie Holiday and the sociohistorical context in which she performed. They will learn how discriminatory statutes (called Jim Crow laws) affected daily life. They will also analyze how movement is created in photographs and the effect of a photographer's point of view on composition. Finally, students will photograph a musician, paying attention to what can be communicated through point of view.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Performing Arts
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/22/2013
The Art and Depiction of Dance (Intermediate Level)
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CC BY
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Students will learn about axial movements and locomotor movements by discussing dancers depicted in a drawing and photograph. They will then practice combining axial and locomotor movements. They will describe how artists depict a dancer's motion in drawing and photography. They will also analyze how an artist creates movement and emphasis through contrast, composition, and leading lines, and then experiment with photography to capture motion in dance.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/22/2013
Before Photography - Photographic Processes Series - Chapter 1 of 12
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From the ancient discovery of the camera obscura to the 18th century mechanical devices used to create silhouettes such as the physionotrace, this initial chapter explores the inventions and inventors that preceded photography. It recreates the experiments of Johann Schulze who proved the light sensitivity of certain silver salts and Thomas Wedgwood’s early attempts to make photographic images. These early pioneers contributed to the discovery of photography in 1839. This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services, grant number MA-10-13-0194.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
George Eastman Museum
Author:
George Eastman Museum
Date Added:
07/29/2021
Breaking the Chains, Rising Out of Circumstances (Advanced Level)
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Advanced-level students will write narratives from the perspective of slaves depicted in rare photographs, and then create a print depicting a moment from the narratives.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/27/2013
Breaking the frame: Ways of Reading Native Photography
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Breaking the frame: Ways of Reading Native Photography

My OER showcases the use of Native American photography as a means of enabling students to connect with historical and contemporary Native issues. Using specific in-class exercises as examples I will show how Native photography addresses issues of racial identity, stereotypes, the sexualizing of Native bodies, and Native American history. I will discuss how the writing of the formal analysis of this photography as art also enables students to engage with the art through a reading that elucidates the contemporary lives of Native individuals and communities. The OER will show how interactive exploration of artistic meaning, and the messages therein, in Native photography leads to increased student intellectual awareness and understanding of the indigenous world around them.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Montana State Univ-Northern Faculty
Date Added:
06/22/2016
Capturing Light: The Science of Photography (Advanced Level)
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CC BY
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Students create and use pinhole cameras to understand how artists use and manipulate light to capture images in photographs. They shoot and develop photographs made with pinhole cameras. They compare and contrast a nineteenth-century image, photographs taken with a pinhole camera, and pictures created with a digital camera or camera phone.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/22/2013
Capturing Light: The Science of Photography (Beginning Level)
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CC BY
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Students create pinhole cameras to understand that light travels in a straight path. They describe the lines and shapes in a nineteenth-century photograph of a building and then use their pinhole cameras to trace the architecture of their school building.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/22/2013
Capturing Light: The Science of Photography (Intermediate Level)
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CC BY
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Students create pinhole cameras to learn how artists manipulate light to make photographs. They describe and analyze a nineteenth-century photograph and use their cameras to capture the architecture of their school or other buildings.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
05/22/2013
The Collodion - Photographic Processes Series - Chapter 5 of 12
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Introduced in 1851, by Frederick Scott Archer, the wet collodion process was a fairly simple, if somewhat cumbersome photographic process. A 2% solution of collodion, bearing a very small percentage of potassium iodide, was poured over a plate of glass, leaving a thin, clear film containing the halide. The plate was then placed in a solution of silver nitrate. When removed from the silver, the collodion film contained a translucent yellow compound of light-sensitive silver iodide. The plate was exposed still wet and then developed by inspection under red light. Once the plate was washed and dried, it was coated with a protective varnish. The collodion process replaced the daguerreotype as the predominant photographic process by the end of the 1850’s. It was eventually replaced in the 1880’s with the introduction of the gelatin silver process. This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services, grant number MA-10-13-0194.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
George Eastman Museum
Author:
George Eastman Museum
Date Added:
07/29/2021
Color Photography - Photographic Processes Series - Chapter 11 of 12
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Photography’s earliest practitioners dreamed of finding a method for reproducing the world around them in color. Some 19th century photographers experimented with chemical formulations aimed at producing color images by direct exposure, while others applied paints and powders to the surfaces of monochrome prints. Vigorous experimentation led to several early color processes, some of which were even patented, but the methods were often impractical, cumbersome and unreliable. This chapter explores early additive color processes as well as later subtractive processes like chromogenic color and the Kodachrome. This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services, grant number MA-10-13-0194.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
George Eastman Museum
Author:
George Eastman Museum
Date Added:
07/29/2021
Comparing Portrayals of Slavery in Nineteenth-Century Photography and Literature
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In this lesson, students analyze similarities and differences among depictions of slavery in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn", Frederick Douglass' "Narrative", and nineteenth century photographs of slaves. Students formulate their analysis of the role of art and fiction, as they attempt to reliably reflect social ills, in a final essay.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
09/28/2013
Creating Family Timelines: Graphing Family Memories and Significant Events
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Students interview family members, and then create graphic family timelines based on important and memorable family events.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
10/02/2013