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Build a Birdhouse
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Students construct bird nests and birdhouses. They research birds of their choosing ...

Students construct bird nests and birdhouses. They research birds of their choosing and then design houses that meet the birds' specific needs. It works well to conduct this activity in conjunction with a grades 9-12 woodshop class by partnering the older students with the younger students (but it is not required to do this in order to conduct the activity).

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Engineering
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
K-12 Outreach Office,
System Design and Analysis based on AD and Complexity Theories, Spring 2005
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Introduction to axiomatic design. Theoretical basis for rational design. One-FR Design. Multi-FR ...

Introduction to axiomatic design. Theoretical basis for rational design. One-FR Design. Multi-FR design. System design. Software design. Product design. Materials and materials process design. Manufacturing system design. Complexities in design: time-independent real complexity, time-independent imaginary complexity, time-dependent combinatorial complexity, and time-dependent periodic complexity. Industrial case studies. This course studies what makes a good design and how one develops a good design. Students consider how the design of engineered systems (such as hardware, software, materials, and manufacturing systems) differ from the "design" of natural systems such as biological systems; discuss complexity and how one makes use of complexity theory to improve design; and discover how one uses axiomatic design theory (AD theory) in design of many different kinds of engineered systems. Questions are analyzed using Axiomatic Design Theory and Complexity Theory. Case studies are presented including the design of machines, tribological systems, materials, manufacturing systems, and recent inventions. Implications of AD and complexity theories on biological systems discussed.

Subject:
Manufacturing
Biology
Material Type:
Case Study
Full Course
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Lecture Notes
Syllabi
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lee, Taesik
Suh, Nam
Urban Design Seminar, Spring 2005
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This course is a requirement for completion of the Urban Design Certificate ...

This course is a requirement for completion of the Urban Design Certificate Program. It investigates the complex nature of 'successful' urban design, and attempts to identify and evaluate examples of urban design that are at the leading edge of practice, anticipating the future. The seminar will deal with two parallel questions: What are the key trends that will shape the future form and function of cities? and how will these changes affect the role of the urban designer? The first part of the seminar focuses on the present, and the second part of the semester will consider the future. After the course surveys the landscape of contemporary urban design practice, the challenge it will pose to students will be to identify the trajectory of cities and city design from both physical and social perspectives.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Full Course
Homework and Assignments
Lecture Notes
Syllabi
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Frenchman, Dennis M.
Urban Design Skills: Observing, Interpreting, and Representing the City, Fall 2004
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An introduction to the methods of recording, evaluating, and communicating about the ...

An introduction to the methods of recording, evaluating, and communicating about the urban environment. Through visual observation, field analysis, measurements, interviews, and other means, students learn to draw on their senses and develop their ability to deduce, conclude, question, and test conclusions about how the environment is used and valued. Through the use of representational tools such as drawing, photographing, computer modeling and desktop publishing, students communicate what is observed as well as their impressions and ideas. Intended as a foundation for future studio work in urban design.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework and Assignments
Syllabi
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ben-Joseph, Eran