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3rd Grade History Unit Design: Native Americans of North America
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This unit on American Indians: By studying the regions of the United States and the cultures that live in each region, students are able to compare/contrast within regions and across regions how tribes used their environments, and their cultural and other contributions to American life.

Note that the emphasis here is on broader groups of tribes for each region with some instruction on specific tribes representing each region. In no way is this case study approach to learning about one tribe meant to be generalized to all tribes of that region. We understand that each tribe was and continues to be unique in its culture, practices, lifeways, and traditions.

Subject:
World Cultures
Elementary Education
U.S. History
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Leslie Heffernan
Date Added:
10/23/2019
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
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This collection uses primary sources to explore The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Literature
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Susan Ketcham
Date Added:
04/11/2016
American Indian Boarding Schools
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This collection uses primary sources to explore American Indian boarding schools. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Hillary Brady
Date Added:
10/20/2015
The American Indian Movement, 1968-1978
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the American Indian Movement between 1968 and 1978. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Franky Abbott
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Book 5, Music Across Classrooms: Visual Arts. Chapter 2, Lesson 1: Negotiating Native Identity Through Art and Music
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In this lesson, students begin by examining the ways their sense of identity might be affected by social pressures associated with different spaces. By watching clips from RUMBLE, students then discover how musicians Robbie Robertson, Stevie Salas, and Taboo have negotiated their Native identities, and compare these musician's journeys with those of earlier Native Americans.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
09/03/2019
Chief Oshkosh Biography
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A short illlustrated biography, provided at three reading levels so that students at, above and below grade level will have equal success with the text. These are available on the iBookstore or as printable booklets in pdf format.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Wisconsin Media Lab
Provider Set:
Wisconsin Biographies
Author:
Wisconsin Media Lab
Date Added:
11/17/2013
Clan Mother: Healing the Community
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In Clan Mother, Molly Miller shares her experience as a healer and explores the role of elders in her community. One of these roles is to bring back Native language and cultural healing practices. This can be a way to heal the historical trauma that resulted when children were taken from their families during the boarding school era. As a Clan Mother, Molly is a leader in the current grassroots efforts to help young people and bring the community together by restoring traditional culture.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Primary Source
Provider:
Wisconsin Media Lab
Provider Set:
The Ways
Author:
Wisconsin Media Lab
Date Added:
10/02/2013
Cross-Cultural Colonial Conflicts
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This collection uses primary sources to explore cross-cultural conflicts during the Colonial period of US History. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Adena Barnette
Date Added:
01/20/2016
Dancing Rainbows
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Public Domain
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Curt, a young Tewa Indian, and his grandfather, Andy, prepare for Feast Day. They enjoy the good food, beautiful dances, colorful costumes € and the time they spend together celebrating the traditions of their ancestors

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Basal Alignment Project
Provider Set:
Fresno District
Author:
Evelyn Clarke Mott
Date Added:
09/01/2013
Elementary Culture Lesson Seed
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IntroductionThis lesson seed includes lesson plans and resources to assist Social Studies teachers in elementary classrooms.  There is a section dedicated to grades 1-3 that focuses on discussing and respecting traditions and cultures of families in the community , as well as a section dedicated to grades 4-5 that focuses on describing the cultures of colonial societies and comparing Native American tribes with European settlers and their influences on each other.  At the bottom of the resources is an academic vocabulary word list for key concepts to consider providing visual support to assist you in tailoring your lessons to ELL students within your classroom, along with link to WIDA CAN DO Descriptors.Lesson Seeds:Lesson seeds are ideas for the standards that can be used to build a lesson. Lesson seeds are not meant to be all-inclusive, nor are they substitutes for instruction. This lesson seed provides a compelling question and a bank of sources to use to drive an inquiry based lesson or a potential Evidence Based Argument Set (EBAS). When developing lessons from these seeds, teachers must consider the needs of all learners. Once you have built your lesson from the lesson seed, teachers are encouraged to post the lesson that has emerged from this lesson seed and share with others. 

Subject:
Elementary Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Jamie Barker
Leah Renzi
MSDE Admin
Sarah DeVan
Katie Lazo
Date Added:
08/01/2018
English Language Arts, Grade 12
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The 12th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 12th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Language study is embedded in every 12th grade unit as students use annotation to closely review aspects of each text. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Global Issues
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Who decides who among us is civilized? What rules should govern immigration into the United States? Whom should we let in? Keep out? What should we do about political refugees or children without papers? What if they would be a drain on our economy?

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read William Shakespeare’s play The Tempest and write a short argument about who in the play is truly civilized.
Students participate in a mock trial in which they argue for or against granting asylum to a teenage refugee, and then they write arguments in favor of granting asylum to one refugee and against granting it to another.
Students read an Independent Reading text and write an informational essay about a global issue and how that relates to their book.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What role do national identity, custom, religion, and other locally held beliefs play in a world increasingly characterized by globalization?
How does Shakespeare’s view of human rights compare with that in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?
Who is civilized? Who decides what civilization is or how it’s defined?
How do we behave toward and acknowledge those whose culture is different from our own?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Global Issues, The Tempest: Who Is Civilized?, Prospero's Justification
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In this lesson, students will begin with a discussion about their reading of the play so far. In small groups, they’ll speculate about where Shakespeare got some of his ideas. They’ll write about Prospero’s justification for causing the life-threatening storm.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
The Enslaved Family, African American Community during Slavery, African American Identity: Vol. I, 1500-1865, Primary Resources in U.S. History and Literature, Toolbox Library, National Humanities Cen
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"I never knew a whole family to live together, till all were grown up, in my life," recalls Lewis Clarke of his twenty-five years enslaved in Kentucky.1 Families were separated due to sale, escape, early death from poor health, suicide, and murder by a slaveholder, overseer, slave patroller, or other dominant person. Separation also occurred within the plantation itself, e.g., by segregating "field slaves" from "house servants," removing children from parents to live together with a slave caretaker, or bringing children fathered by the slaveholder to live in the "Big House." How, then, did the slave family provide solace and identity? "What the family does, and what the family did for African Americans," writes historian Deborah White Gray, "was create a world outside of the world of work. It allowed for significant others. It allowed a male slave to be more than just a brute beast. It allowed him to be a father, to be a son. It allowed women to be mothers and to take on roles that were outside of that of a slave, of a servant."2 When did the enslaved child realize how his or her family life differed from the slave-holder's? How did enslaved adults cope with the forced disintegration of their families? Here we read a collection of texts—two letters, a memoir, and interview excerpts—to consider these questions. (See also Theme II: ENSLAVEMENT, #2, Sale.)

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
National Humanities Center
Date Added:
05/03/2019
Exploration of the Americas
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This collection uses primary sources to explore early exploration of the Americas. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
World History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Kerry Dunne
Date Added:
01/20/2016
Forgotten Rebellion: Black Seminoles and the Largest Slave Revolt in U.S. History
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The story of John Horse and the Black Seminoles has been largely untold, but according to Professor Amy Sturgis of Signum University, it deserves to be remembered. Not only did they create the largest haven in the U.S. South for runaway slaves and lead the largest slave revolt in U.S. history, but they also secured the only emancipation of rebellious slaves prior to the U.S. Civil War. In this video, Professor Sturgis tells the incredible story of the Black Seminoles.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Amy Sturgis
Date Added:
09/14/2017
History of Survivance: Upper Midwest 19th-Century Native American Narratives
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For every object that ends up in a library or museum collection – whether it’s a manucript, a photograph, or something more approaching the concept of “art” – there is a narrative, a story that gets told. The story a visitor to an exhibit ends up hearing, of course, is dependent upon who is telling the story and the slant of their own perspective. When the subject of the exhibit is Native Americans in the Upper Midwestern United States during the extraordinary upheaval of the 19th century, one must be particularly careful about the story being told since the narrative that largely exists is one of cultural denouement, of endings, as told by a colonizing population to its descendants. The dominant narrative of the demise of traditional Native American culture in the face of colonization, conversion to Christianity, confinement to reservations and economic collapse is, however, not the only story that can be told. The accounts of the lives of Native Americans during the 19th century that are told by Native peoples themselves are strikingly different to those recounted in history books, movies, and all too frequently in museums. Rather than narratives solely recounting destruction and demise, Native stories about Native history tend to focus on what White Earth Ojibwe scholar Gerald Vizenor has called survivance – a narrative incorporating themes of survival and resistance that insist on the inclusion of the Native presence. The following is an exhibit of resources that can be found within the Digital Public Library of America retold through the lens of Native American survivance in the Minnesota region. Within are a series of objects of both Native and non-Native origin that tell a story of extraordinary culture disruption, change and continuity during 19th c., and how that affects the Native population of Minnesota today. This exhibit was created by the Minnesota Digital Library.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Minnesota Digital Library
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
A History of Treaties and Reservations on the Olympic Peninsula, 1855-1898
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The curriculum materials in this packet are intended to provide middle- and high-school teachers with the background and basic tools they need to develop and incorporate lessons about Indian-white relations in Washington into existing lessons about the history of the United States and Washington. This packet focuses on the treaty negotiations and the establishment of reservations on the Olympic Peninsula that took place in the last half of the 19th century, but it also provides a broad overview of how relations between Indian nations and the United States government evolved in the first hundred years of the nation's history.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of Washington
Provider Set:
Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest
Date Added:
02/16/2011