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Digital Age Skills: HS English Movie Trailer
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This resource was created by Megan Andersen in collaboration with Crystal Hurt as part of the 2019-20 ESU-NDE Digital Age Pedagogy Project. Educators worked with coaches to create Lesson Plans promoting both content area and digital age skills. This Lesson Plan is designed for 10th Grade English Language Arts.  

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Crystal Hurt
Date Added:
06/02/2020
Do you have time today?, Korean, Novice High
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In this lab, students will converse with their partners to make a plan to meet. The students will ask their partners when they are able to meet and where they would like to meet. Students will learn about days of the week, time, and making plans with other people. 

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Daum Jung
Mimi Fahnstrom
Amber Hoye
Date Added:
02/21/2020
E.T. Phone Home: Fact or Fiction?
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A favorite movie, “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial,” provides the backdrop scenario for students to discover how harnessing the sun’s energy provides unlimited power for many purposes, including the operation of thousands of satellites in orbit today and communication over long distances. In the movie, E.T., an alien life form, is stranded on Earth and befriends Elliott, the little boy who rescues him. As E.T. becomes gravely ill, Elliott realizes that E.T. needs to return home in order to survive. To arrange for transport, E.T. must “phone home.” Teams engage in an interactive quest to answer the question: E.T. phone home—fact or fiction? They must discover four clues in order to unlock four padlocks on a box that contains the answer. This requires them to watch a one-minute online video, complete a crossword puzzle, scan three QR codes for articles to read, and put together a cut-apart puzzle with an invisible ink clue. They watch short online movie excerpt videos to kick off and wrap up the activity.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
Activities
Author:
Jodie Guillen
Date Added:
01/12/2018
Great Gatsby Relevant Themes
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CC BY
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Driving question:What is the most irrelevant theme to today's modern society from The Great Gatsby?Purpose:1. Students to think critically and analytically.2. Students to gain a more in-depth understanding of how to find themes within texts and be able to have a deeper connection with modern society. Standards: 1) 9-10. RL. 2.2: Analyze in detail the development of two or more themes or central ideas over the course of a work of literature, including how they emerge and are shaped and refined by specific details.2) 9-10.RN.4.3: Analyze seminal U.S. and world documents of historical and literacy significance, including how they address related themes and concepts. Grabbers: To show clips from the movie to highlight themes that will be assigned to students. These clips can be used as evidence for the students projects (video clips are in teacher materials tab).https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKs6tUxVC7M - Morals and American Dreamhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqA1ISMJJQY - Society and Class or Moralshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyZrLD_fDLY - materialism and Gender Roleshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yH7eRHHVGGA - materialismhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTWumSE8GXM - moralityhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCxbZ8D7N1o - gender rolesLesson Summary:After the class has read the Great Gatsby, Groups of five will be assigned one main theme from the reading and they will have to support why they think their theme is the most relevant in today’s modern society. They will find sub arguments within the text in order to support this claim and present this information through a digital presentation. Students will also be required to use direct references and quotes to defend their answer. Groups should split up the work evenly and work collaboratively. Students will present their digital presentations to the class. Students will then have a debate taking the persuasive stance on why they think their theme is the most relevant and support it through evidence from their research. After the digital presentations are turned in, presented, and each student is informed by other group's theme in detail by the presentation and challanged by debate, students will write an individual reflection on what theme they personally think is the most relevant in today's society.Lesson Narrative:Introduction: Remind students of presentation expecptations and focuses on the central question asked - What is the most irrelevant theme to today’s modern society from The Great Gatsby?Presentations: Students representing groups that support the six themes from the book, (morality, American dream, society, class, materialism, and gender roles) give presentations that are informative, descriptive, and supported with evidence from the book and other outside sources to the class. Instructor: Asks leading questions during presentations to allow students to go more in depth on their theme. Addresses any questions or misinterpretations that occurred during the presentations. Debate: Each group will then be challenged by the other students of different themes and should argue why their theme is the most relevant in today's society. Each group should respectfully address one another and challenge each others ideas and to support their own with their evidence from their presentations. Each group should work together in order to work towards the goal of being the most relevant by collaboration.Instructor: The instructor uses questions to clarify factual claims, ask for supporting evidence, include other members within the class in the debate, and connect the presentations to the discussion to broaden the understanding of each theme/side to the book and it's relevance.Debriefing: The instructor again asks the driving question. Clarifies any confusion, questions, or misinterpretations raised during the debate. Then summarizes what happened during the debate and lets the class think about other group's stance on their themes. Culminating Activity:1. Provide closure for major driving question.2. Gives the opportunity for students to be persuasive and show their understanding of the lesson. Lesson SummaryAfter researching, presenting, and discussing the central driving question mentioned before, students should be able to write an individual essay based off of previous experience with the project. The individual essay will require the students to reflect on their understanding and take from their personal opinion on what they think the most relevant issue in The Great Gatsby to today's modern society. Example of Culminating ActivityA Persuasive EssayAnswer the following question as an individual reflection from the previous lesson: What is your personal opinion on what theme from the Great Gatsby is the most relevant in today's society? Now that you have researched, presented, and discussed extensively the main 6 themes from the Great Gatsby: morality, American dream, society, class, materialism, and gender roles, pick ONE of these themes and have sub-arguments, evidence, and quotes to support your opinion. This paper should be at least 5 paragraphs long, see guidelines below. The paper should be in MLA format and cited correctly. No direct quotes should be longer than three lines. Paragraph 1: Introduction - short summary of the book, thesis Paragraph 2: Sub-argument with evidence from book, movie, class presentations, debate, and other outside sources to support this argument. Paragraph 3: Sub-argument with evidence from book, movie, class presentations, debate, and other outside sources to support this argument.Paragraph 4: Sub-argument with evidence from book, movie, class presentations, debate, and other outside sources to support this argument. Paragraph 5: Conclusion - Wrap up thoughts, restate thesis 

Subject:
Language Education (ESL)
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Quynn Hickey
Hannah Hogenkamp
Sammi Shapiro
Date Added:
10/05/2016
The Hole in the Pole Gang
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This article is about the latest remake of Jules Verne's popular 144-year-old novel Journey to the Center of the Earth that also provides links to the American Geologic Institute's (AIG) Educator Guide for using the movie (Journey to the Center of the Earth 3D) to interest students in geology and earth science.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears: An Online Magazine for K-5 Teachers
Author:
Carol Minton Morris
Date Added:
10/17/2014
Magical Motion
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Students watch video clips from the October Sky and Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone movies to see examples of projectile motion. Then they explore the relationships between displacement, velocity and acceleration, and calculate simple projectile motion. The objective of this activity is to articulate concepts related to force and motion through direct immersive interaction based on "The Science Behind Harry Potter" theme. Students' interest is piqued by the use of popular culture in the classroom.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Christine Hawthorne
Rachel Howser
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Projectile Magic
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Educational Use
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Students watch video clips from October Sky and Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone to learn about projectile motion. They explore the relationships between displacement, velocity and acceleration and calculate simple projectile motion. The objective of this activity is to articulate concepts related to force and motion through direct immersive interaction based on the theme, The Science Behind Harry Potter. Students' interest is piqued by the use of popular culture in the classroom.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Christine Hawthorne
Rachel Howser
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Sound Environment Shapers
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Students are introduced to the sound environment as an important aspect of a room or building. Several examples of acoustical engineering design for varied environments are presented. Students learn the connections between the science of sound waves and engineering design for sound environments.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Michael Bendewald
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Transmedia Storytelling: Narrative worlds, emerging technologies, and global audiences MOOC
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Transmedia storytelling is the practice of designing, sharing, and participating in a cohesive story experience across multiple traditional and digital delivery platforms - for entertainment, advertising and marketing, or social change.

This course will help you to design a strategy for developing and telling your own transmedia story. You will learn about what it takes to:
• Shape your ideas into compelling and well structured narratives and complex story worlds
• Identify, understand, and engage different audiences in your stories
• Create cohesive user experiences across different platforms
• Evaluate existing and emerging technologies to share your story with the world, and help your audience participate in the larger storyworld you create

The course provides you with a unique, authentic, and industry relevant learning opportunity. You will have access to current theory, industry examples and advice and undertake learning activities that will equip you with the tools you need to start developing your own ideas.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Career and Technical Education
Education
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Simon McIntyre
Date Added:
09/20/2016
Windows Movie Maker in the English Classroom
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Ready to revolutionize the book report? Give students the chance to enter into literature, concepts, biographies, and more in their own creative way: video editing. Free and simple software such as Windows Movie Maker make it easy for students to quickly become pros and to turn formal presentations upside down.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Connexions
Author:
Eric Brinker
Date Added:
02/16/2011
영화와 드라마/ Movies and Dramas , Novice High, Korean 201, Lab 09
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In this lab, students will discuss what movies and dramas they have watched. They will share their favorite movie or drama and give a simple summary of it. Students will learn to describe plot, characters, and action of a story. Additionally, they will describe preferences and explain the reason behind their preferences.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Amber Hoye
Daum Jung
Camille Daw
Mimi Fahnstrom
Date Added:
04/08/2020
오늘 시간 있어요? /Do you have time today?, Novice High, Korean 201, Lab 08
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In this lab, students will converse with their partners to make a plan to meet. The students will ask their partners when they are able to meet and where they would like to meet. Students will learn about days of the week, time, and making plans with other people.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Amber Hoye
Daum Jung
Camille Daw
Mimi Fahnstrom
Date Added:
04/08/2020