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4c. Hammurabi's Code: An Eye for an Eye
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Hammurabi is the best known and most celebrated of all Mesopotamian kings. He ruled the Babylonian Empire from 1792-50 B.C.E. Although he was concerned with keeping order in his kingdom, this was not his only reason for compiling the list of laws. When he began ruling the city-state of Babylon, he had control of no more than 50 square miles of territory. As he conquered other city-states and his empire grew, he saw the need to unify the various groups he controlled.

Subject:
Ancient History
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
Ancient Civilizations of the World
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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In this course, the student will study the emergence of the major civilizations of the ancient world, beginning with the Paleolithic Era (about 2.5 million years ago) and finishing with the end of the Middle Ages in fifteenth century A.D. The student will pay special attention to how societies evolved across this expanse of time - from fragmented and primitive agricultural communities to more advanced and consolidated civilizations. By the end of the course, the student will possess a thorough understanding of important overarching social, political, religious, and economic themes in the ancient world, ranging from the emergence of Confucian philosophy in Asia to the fall of imperial Rome. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and define the world's earliest civilizations, including the Neolithic Revolution, and describe how it shaped the development of these early civilizations; Identify, describe, and compare/contrast the first advanced civilizations in the world - Mesopotamia and Egypt; Identify and describe the emergence of the earliest civilizations in Asia: the Harappan and Aryan societies on the Indian subcontinent and the Shang and Zhou societies in China; Identify and describe the emergence of new philosophies - Daoism and Confucianism - during the Warring States period in China. Identify and describe the subsequent rise of the Qin and Han dynasties; Identify and describe the different periods that characterized ancient Greece - Archaic Greece (or the Greek Dark Ages), classical Greece, and the Hellenistic era; Identify and describe the characteristics of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and Imperial Rome; Analyze the emergence of the Mauryan and Gupta empires during the 'classical age' in India; Identify and analyze the Buddhist and Vedic (Hindu) faiths; Identify and describe the rise of civilizations in the Americas, particularly in Meso and South America; Analyze and describe the rise of Islam in the Middle East; Identify and describe the emergence of the Arab caliphate, the Umayyad dynasty, and Abbasid dynasty; Identify and describe the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire; Identify and analyze key facets of medieval society in Western EuropeĺÎĺĚ_ĺÜthe Catholic Church, feudalism, and the rise of technology and commerce; Analyze and interpret primary-source documents that elucidate the exchanges and advancements made in civilizations across time and space. (History 101)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Ancient History Encyclopedia
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Ancient History Encyclopedia is a non-profit educational website with a global vision: to provide the best ancient history information on the internet for free.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Reading
Textbook
Provider:
Ancient History Encyclopedia
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Neo-Assyrian Art: Human Headed Winged Lion and Bull (Lamassu)
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This art history video discussion looks at the Human-headed Winged Lion and Bull (Lamassu), 883--859 B.C.E., Neo-Assyrian period, reign of Ashurnasirpal II, excavated at Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), northern Mesopotamia (Metropolitan Museum of Art).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Brian Seymour
Monica Hahn
Text Structures-Informational Writing/Mesopotamia Unit
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This 18 day unit explicitly teaches text structures, summary, text features, reading informational text about Mesopotamia, and writing a book about Mesopotamia. Instruction moves from high scaffolding to moderate scaffolding to independent practice as students become familiar with the various text structures, how to identify them, what graphic organizer will work with each text structure, how to use notes recorded in graphic organizers to write summaries, and how to compile an informational book. Mesopotamia is the content used as an anchor.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Urban Ecosystems 2: Why Are There Cities? A Historical Perspective
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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This purpose of this lesson is to understand the importance of food production and food surpluses to the origin and historical development of urban ecosystems. To understand how the exploitation of forests, irrigation waters, and other resources led to catastrophic consequences for some early cities.

This lesson was developed by Dr. Penny Firth, a scientist, as part of a set of interdisciplinary Science NetLinks lessons aimed at improved understanding of environmental phenomena and events. This is the second of a strand of five lessons.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Author:
Dr. Penny Firth
World Civilizations I (HIST 126)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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History 126 is the first term of a three-quarter sequence on World Civilizations. The three courses may be taken in any order, but it is preferable to take 126 first. This course begins with a look at pre-historical societies, including early urban settlements, moving through the early histories of Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, and China, to a consideration of Hebrew, Greek, Roman and early Christian history. The Celts will be examined and then a study of the barbarian societies that helped cause the fall of the Western Roman Empire. Students of History 126 will increase their understanding of the religious, political, military, social, scientific, intellectual and cultural structures of world societies.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library