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  • Memory
Addiction and Neural Ageing
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This unit looks at two topics that are of immense worldwide social, economic, ethical, and political importance -"addiction' and"neural ageing'. You will develop a Master's level approach to the study of specific issues within these two important subject areas.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Author:
The Open University
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Affective Priming at Short and Extremely Short Exposures, Spring 2003
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This course is an investigation of affective priming and creation of rigorously counterbalanced, fully computerized testing paradigm. Includes background readings, study design, counterbalancing, study execution, data analysis, presentation of poster, and final paper.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Corkin, Suzanne
Date Added:
01/01/2003
The Brain: Teaching Modules
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Developed from the original series The Brain, these flexible resources offer extensive footage and research into the inner workings of this amazing human organ, including findings on Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, autism, Parkinson's disease, and many other topics. The modules are appropriate for use in general and advanced courses in psychology, abnormal and physiological psychology, neuropsychology, and occupational therapy. Video teaching modules for college and high school classrooms and adult learners; 32 video modules (from 5 to 20 minutes in length) and guide.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Annenberg Learner
Date Added:
01/01/1997
The Brain and Cognitive Sciences I, Fall 2002
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Survey of principles underlying the structure and function of the nervous system, integrating molecular, cellular, and systems approaches. Topics: development of the nervous system and its connections, cell biology or neurons, neurotransmitters and synaptic transmission, sensory systems of the brain, the neuroendocrine system, the motor system, higher cortical functions, behavioral and cellular analyses of learning and memory. First half of an intensive two-term survey of brain and behavioral studies for first-year graduate students. Open to graduate students in other departments, with permission of instructor.

Subject:
Biology
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Graybiel, Ann
Miller, Earl Keith
Wilson, Matt
Wilson, Matthew
Date Added:
01/01/2002
The Brain and Cognitive Sciences II, Spring 2006
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This class is the second half of an intensive survey of cognitive science for first-year graduate students. Topics include visual perception, language, memory, cognitive architecture, learning, reasoning, decision-making, and cognitive development. Topics covered are from behavioral, computational, and neural perspectives.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Tenenbaum, Joshua
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Cognitive Neuroscience, Spring 2006
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This course explores the cognitive and neural processes that support attention, vision, language, motor control, navigation, and memory. It introduces basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and behavioral measures of cognition, and discusses methods by which inferences about the brain bases of cognition are made. We consider evidence from patients with neurological diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Balint's syndrome, amnesia, and focal lesions from stroke) and from normal human participants.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Corkin, Suzanne
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Cognitive Processes, Spring 2004
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An introduction to human information processing and learning; topics include the nature of mental representation and processing; the architecture of memory; pattern recognition; attention; imagery and mental codes; concepts and prototypes; reasoning and problem solving.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Potter, Mary C.
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Cognitive Psychology
Conditions of Use:
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This course will introduce you to cognitive psychology. Memory, along with attention, perception, language, and decision making, are among the most prominent topics within this broad and diverse field. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify underlying theoretical considerations in the field of cognitive psychology; Describe the historical context in which cognitive psychology emerged as a field; Define cognitive psychology as is was historically defined and is now defined; Identify the main academic fields and other subdisciplines of psychology to which cognitive psychology is tied; Describe the main findings in the primary areas of scientific research within cognitive psychology; Compare and contrast the theories associated within the primary areas of scientific research in cognitive psychology (e.g., models of memory, attention, etc.). (Psychology 206)

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
College Reading
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

College Reading I designed to meet a variety of more advanced reading and study skill needs, primarily the need to read college level materials more effectively. Students learn to recognize main ideas, to read an article or chapter and remember its key points, to take inclusive, meaningful notes, to read actively and critically, to explore memory techniques, and to respond to our language with greater vocabulary depth. PLEASE NOTE: This course is a developmental course and DOES NOT carry graduation credit. It is NOT usually transferable. Since developmental courses are mandated courses, students who do not meet the exit criteria of a C or higher will be required to repeat it.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Northern Essex Community College
Author:
Marilyn McCarthy
Date Added:
05/15/2019
Computer Architecture
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The purpose of this course is to cultivate an understanding of modern computing technology through an in-depth study of the interface between hardware and software. The student will study the history of modern computing technology before learning about modern computer architecture, then the recent switch from sequential processing to parallel processing. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: identify important advances that have taken place in the history of modern computing and discuss some of the latest trends in computing industry; explain how programs written in high-level programming language, such as C or Java, can be translated into the language of the hardware; describe the interface between hardware and software and explain how software instructs hardware to accomplish desired functions; demonstrate an understanding of the process of carrying out sequential logic design; demonstrate an understanding of computer arithmetic hardware blocks and floating point representation; explain how a hardware programming language is executed on hardware and how hardware and software design affect performance; demonstrate an understanding of the factors that determine the performance of a program; demonstrate an understanding of the techniques that designers use to improve the performance of programs running on hardware; demonstrate an understanding of the importance of memory hierarchy in computer design and explain how memory design impacts overall hardware performance; demonstrate an understanding of storage and I/O devices, their performance measurement, and redundant array of inexpensive disks (more commonly referred to by the acronym RAID) technology; list the reasons for and the consequences of the recent switch from sequential processing to parallel processing in hardware manufacture and explain the basics of parallel programming. (Computer Science 301)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/16/2011
Coping with Changes
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The purpose of this Science NetLinks lesson is to understand how the nervous system allows us to learn, remember, and cope with changes in the environment. In grades 3-5, students start viewing the body as one whole system, as one whole organism. In the 6th grade and up, students should start to understand how organs and organ systems work together. For instance, the brain is part of the nervous system and works in conjunction with neurons (cells). The nervous system works with all other body systems, such as the musculoskeletal system. The activities in this lesson introduce the nervous system, both in parts and as a whole. By learning about the whole system, students will understand that the brain, spinal cord, and nerve cells are at the root of all other body functions.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
10/21/2005
Discover Psychology 2.0 - A Brief Introductory Text
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This textbook presents core concepts common to introductory courses. The 15 units cover the traditional areas of intro-to-psychology; ranging from biological aspects of psychology to psychological disorders to social psychology. This book can be modified: feel free to add or remove modules to better suit your specific needs.

This book includes a comprehensive instructor's manual, PowerPoint presentations, a test bank, reading anticipation guides, and adaptive student quizzes.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Cara Laney
David M. Buss
David Watson
Edward Diener
Elizabeth F. Loftus
Emily Hooker
George Loewenstein
Henry L. Roediger III
Jeanne Tsai
Kathleen B. McDermott
Mark E. Bouton
Max H. Bazerman
Richard E. Lucas
Robert Siegler
Robert V. Levine
Ross Thompson
Sarah Pressman
Sudeep Bhatia
Susan T. Fiske
Yoshihisa Kashima
Date Added:
12/08/2016
Discovering Memory: Li-Young Lee's Poem “Mnemonic”  and the Brain
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Students learn about memory by doing a memory-writing exercise, studying the brain to understand how it affects memory, reading Li-Young Lee's poem ńMnemonic,î and creating projects to demonstrate their understanding.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
08/23/2013
Discovering Psychology: Updated Edition
Conditions of Use:
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Highlighting major new developments in the field, this updated edition of Discovering Psychology offers high school and college students, and teachers of psychology at all levels, an overview of historic and current theories of human behavior. Stanford University professor and author Philip Zimbardo narrates as leading researchers, practitioners, and theorists probe the mysteries of the mind and body. Based on extensive investigation and authoritative scholarship, this introductory course in psychology features demonstrations, classic experiments and simulations, current research, documentary footage, and computer animation. This series is also valuable for teachers seeking to review the subject matter. A video instructional series on introductory psychology for college and high school classrooms and adult learners; 26 half-hour video programs and coordinated books.

Subject:
Early Childhood Development
Psychology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Annenberg Learner
Date Added:
01/01/2001
Elementary Data Structures
Conditions of Use:
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In this course, the student will learn the theoretical and practical aspects of algorithms and Data Structures. The student will also learn to implement Data Structures and algorithms in C/C++, analyze those algorithms, and consider both their worst-case complexity and practical efficiency. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify elementary Data Structures using C/C++ programming languages; Analyze the importance and use of Abstract Data Types (ADTs); Design and implement elementary Data Structures such as arrays, trees, Stacks, Queues, and Hash Tables; Explain best, average, and worst-cases of an algorithm using Big-O notation; Describe the differences between the use of sequential and binary search algorithms. (Computer Science 201)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/16/2011
English Romantic Poetry
Conditions of Use:
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In this course, the student will examine the revolutionary energy, fascination with nature, desire to create art for the masses, and inward-facing focus of the Romantic period. First, the student will look at the broader socio-historical and literary context in which English Romantic poetry thrived, then examine the Romantic poet and the outer world, the Romantic poet and the inner world, and the poetry that bridges the gap between the two, attempting to understand what makes each poem 'Romantic.' Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: provide an account of Romanticism as both an historical period as well as a movement in art and literature; identify and explain Romanticism in terms of its relation to the French Revolution; describe the new views of society and social relations that arose during this era; explain the significance of industrialization, the rise of the working class, the expansion of British Empire, the heightening of British nationalism, and the rise of the press; explain Romanticism's relationship to Neo-Classicism; list and describe the major tenets of Romanticism, including the movement's interests in the natural world, supernaturalism, revolution, morality, ethics, exoticism, urbanization, mindscapes, moods, imagination, and interiority; provide an account of the nature and function of the Romantic craft of authorship. (English Literature 404)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/10/2011
Ethnic Politics II, Spring 2007
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Subject has three goals: introduces students to the classic works on ethnic politics, familiarizes students with new research and methodological innovations in the study of ethnic politics, and helps students design and execute original research projects related to ethnic politics. Readings drawn from across disciplines, including political science, anthropology, sociology, and economics. Students read across the four subfields within political science. Graduate students specializing in any subfield are encouraged to take this subject, regardless of their previous empirical or theoretical background. Subject designed as a year-long research workshop, but may also be taken in either semester. This course is designed mainly for political science graduate students conducting or considering conducting research on identity politics. While 17.504 Ethnic Politics I is designed as a primarily theoretical course, Ethnic Politics II switches the focus to methods. It aims to familiarize the student with the current conventional approaches as well as major challenges to them. The course discusses definition and measurement issues as well as briefly addressing survey techniques and modeling.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Petersen, Roger
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Exploring and Sharing Family Stories
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

Writing gets personal when students interview family members in order to write a personal narrative about that person.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
08/23/2013
General Psychology: An Introduction
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The NOBA Project is a growing collection of expert-authored, open-licensed modules in psychology, funded by the Diener Education Fund. From these open modules, Tori Kearns and Deborah Lee created an arranged open textbook for her introductory psychology class. This textbook was created under a Round One ALG Textbook Transformation Grant.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Deborah Lee
Tori Kearns
Date Added:
07/03/2019