Updating search results...

Search Resources

23 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • Martin Luther King
Adding to the Picture: The 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

In this activity, students examine three documents to better understand the goals, participants, and leaders of the 1963 March on Washington.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
11/21/2019
African American History: From Emancipation to the Present
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The purpose of this course is to examine the African American experience in the United States from 1863 to the present. Prominent themes include the end of the Civil War and the beginning of Reconstruction; African Americans' urbanization experiences; the development of the modern civil rights movement and its aftermath; and the thought and leadership of Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr., and Malcolm X. WARNING: Some of the lectures in this course contain graphic content and/or adult language that some users may find disturbing.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Jonathan Holloway
Date Added:
04/30/2012
Bayard Rustin: A Freedom Budget, Part 2
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

This audio excerpt from Bayard Rustin's 1967 "Freedom Budget" speech outlines a nine-year plan to end poverty in America.

Subject:
U.S. History
Economics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
Birmingham Civil Rights Institute
Institute of Museum and Library Services
Washington University in St. Louis
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
05/06/2004
The Civil Rights Movement
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

In 1948, President Harry Truman took an early step towards civil rights reform by issuing Executive Order 9981, which eliminated racial segregation in the military. After World War II, African Americans ? then often called Negroes or "coloreds," began to mobilize against discrimination. They demanded an end to segregation and fought for equality in education, housing, and employment opportunities. The images in this topic show that by the 1960s, their struggle ? which began in the segregated South ? had reached California. As a number of photographs in this topic show, many Californians showed their support for Civil Rights activists and victims of racial discrimination in the South by holding marches, rallies, and demonstrations urging equality for African Americans. In one image three white children in San Francisco hold a sign in support of the four young black girls killed in the 1963 bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Photographs also show people in San Francisco boycotting Kress and Woolworth's department stores, sites of racial discrimination in the South. Documents shown here include a flyer urging the boycott of the stores; and a Western Union telegram sent in 1963, stating that Civil Rights activists Roy Wilkins and Medgar Evers were arrested attempting to picket Woolworth's in Jackson, Mississippi. Two photographs of memorials for slain civil rights leaders ? a march in honor Medgar Evers in 1963, in Los Angeles, and a memorial in the San Francisco Bay Area for Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1968 ? show racially mixed crowds in attendance. But not all Californians sympathized with the Civil Rights movement. Images of racial hatred and prejudice are reflected in the photograph of an African American woman holding a rock that had been thrown through an office window, and Klu Klux Klan graffiti spray-painted on a home. Various groups formed to fight in the struggle for equal rights. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), formed in 1909, entered a new phase during this period, leading in the organized struggle for civil rights. An example of how the NAACP communicated about events is reflected in a letter from the Alameda County branch of the NAACP on June 13, 1950, which reported segregation on the Southern Pacific Railroad trains leaving Los Angeles. A flyer promoting the boycott of California grapes exemplifies NAACP support for other rights movements, in this case the United Farm Workers. Other flyers urged Californians to fight sharecropper wages and "Keep Mississippi Out of California." Groups such as the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and student groups also protested segregation and incidents of racial discrimination in the South. Several important African American leaders ? including Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Thurgood Marshall, and Ralph Abernathy ? all came to California, as documented by photographs included here. Sometimes, the price of fighting for social justice was high. Two images capture events held for leaders in the social justice movement who were assassinated: the 1963 memorial march in Los Angeles for civil rights leader Medgar Evers; and a crowd attending a Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial Rally in honor of the slain civil rights leader.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of California
Provider Set:
Calisphere - California Digital Library
Date Added:
04/25/2013
El Show de Gabby
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

¡Aprende sobre los logros de George Washington, Eleanor Roosevelt, el Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. y Dolores Huerta actuandolos!

Sawyer, un estudiante de la clase de historia, se imagina que presenta un programa de entrevistas con los invitados George Washington, Eleanor Roosevelt, el Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. y Dolores Huerta. Cuando Sawyer entrevista a estas figuras históricas sobre sus logros, los espectadores actúan frases que representan cada uno de sus legados.

Objetivo de Aprendizaje:
Identificar las contribuciones de las figuras históricas George Washington, Eleanor Roosevelt, el Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. y Dolores Huerta.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
Take The Stage
Date Added:
10/30/2019
English Language Arts, Grade 12
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

The 12th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 12th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Language study is embedded in every 12th grade unit as students use annotation to closely review aspects of each text. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Social Class and the Law
Rating
0.0 stars

The laws that govern and the social norms that regulate society are not always fair, legal, moral, or ethical. What is a person to do about all this injustice? What are the hazards of righting injustices or changing social norms? And what are the dangers of doing nothing?

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate Antigone, “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” and Pygmalion.
Students write a literary analysis showing the effect of social class or the law on a character’s life.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How do social class and legal institutions shape literary characters’ lives (and presumably our lives)?
How does social class affect a person in dealing with the law (protect a person, hurt a person)?
How is social class determined in America and in other places in the world?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Social Class and the Law, Antigone, the Law, and Social Class, Reading Groups
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students finish reading, annotating, and discussing Antigone. Then they will meet in their Independent Reading Groups for the first time.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Social Class and the Law, Antigone, the Law, and Social Class, The Laws in Thebes
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students discuss the ending of Antigone and retake the survey about justice that they took in Lesson 1. They will also write about how the laws in Thebes have shaped the lives of the characters who live there.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Social Class and the Law, Disobedience, Law, and Social Class, A Letter from a Birmingham Jail.
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students will take the second in a series of three Cold Write assessments in the narrative genre. The Benchmark Assessment (Cold Write) is an unassisted and unrevised piece of writing with the purpose of providing a quick gauge of the student’s mastery of the characteristics of a given genre. Today’s Benchmark Assessment (Cold Write) measures and provides a benchmark of students’ mastery of narrative writing. They’ll also continue reading, annotating, and discussing “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.” Then they’ll focus on the charges made against Dr. King and how he refutes them.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Social Class and the Law, Disobedience, Law, and Social Class, Building A Convincing Argument
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students look at “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” again, focusing on Dr. King’s writing style. Then students will try to write a paragraph using his style of repeating passages or phrases to build a convincing argument.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Social Class and the Law, Disobedience, Law, and Social Class, Civil Disobedience
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students learn about civil disobedience—about people purposefully disobeying a law that they feel to be unjust. They’ll read from two examples that address the issue: Henry David Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience” and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.”

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Every Punctuation Mark Matters: A Minilesson on Semicolons
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

Students analyze stylistic choices and grammar use in authentic writing, focusing on the use of the semicolon in Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
10/02/2013
Fighting for Our Rights - Beginning Level
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson outlines the importance of Susan B. Anthony and Martin Luther King, Jr. in U.S. history. It also presents information about the civil rights movement and reviews the First Amendment rights. Prior to teaching Fighting for Our Rights, we recommend covering two other USCIS civics lessons first: Benjamin Franklin and the U.S. Constitution, and Bill of Rights and Other Amendments. Depending on your schedule, you may also want to cover the lessons on Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War as there is related historical information that would help your students better understand the current lesson. Covers civics test items 6, 77, 84, 85, and 100.

Subject:
Language Education (ESL)
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
Provider Set:
Beginning Level Lesson Plans
Date Added:
09/04/2015
Happy Birthday, Dr. King
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson provides teachers with support for using text-dependent questions and Common Core literacy strategies to help students derive big ideas and key understandings while developing vocabulary using the text "Happy Birthday Dr. King". When ten-year old Jamalĺĺs grandfather hears that the boy is in trouble for fighting to sit in the back of the bus, he tells Jamal about Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Jr., and the civil rights movement. Jamal responds with an idea for a skit for his schoolĺĺs King Day assembly.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Basal Alignment Project
Provider Set:
Anchorage District
Author:
Kathryn Jones
Date Added:
10/01/2013
I Have a Dream: Exploring Nonviolence in Young Adult Texts
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

Students will identify how Martin Luther King JrŐs dream of nonviolent conflict-resolution is reinterpreted in modern texts. Homework is differentiated to prompt discussion on how nonviolence is portrayed through characterization and conflict. Students will be formally assessed on a thesis essay that addresses the Six Kingian Principles of Nonviolence.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
11/25/2013
Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" Speech
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
5.0 stars

Students will display their understanding of the symbolism and references that Dr. King used to enrich his famous speech on August 28, 1963 from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial by constructing a "jackdaw," a collection of documents and objects.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Charlotte Lammers
Date Added:
06/09/2000
Media Construction of Social Justice
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

This curriculum explores how social justice movements over the past 180 years have been perceived bypeople in the United States and how the U.S. media has constructed that public perception. Eachunit includes three lessons, each one devoted to a different media form including visual images, filmclips and song excerpts. The subject areas covered include U.S. history, African-American studies,criminal justice studies, immigrant studies, labor studies, Latino studies, LGBT studies, media studies, peace studies, sociology and women's studies among many others. The kit will be of particular interest to high school American history teachers and college level social justice studies professors.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Author:
Sox Sperry
Date Added:
03/07/2013