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The American Novel: Stranger and Stranger, Spring 2013
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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This course covers works by major American novelists, beginning with the late 18th century and concluding with a contemporary novelist. The class places major emphasis on reading novels as literary texts, but attention is paid to historical, intellectual, and political contexts as well. The syllabus varies from term to term, but many of the following writers are represented: Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Wharton, James, and Toni Morrison. Previously taught topics include The American Revolution and Makeovers (i.e. adaptations and reinterpretation of novels traditionally considered as American "Classics"). May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission so long as the content differs.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wyn Kelley
Date Added:
01/01/2013
Analyze Literature Critically Using the SIFT Method
Rating

Ms. Berkowitz and Coleytown Middle School students prepare for a class discussion comparing the tone/theme of two different poems by systematically breaking down the individual poems using the SIFT method (symbolism, imagery, figurative language, tone/theme). Working independently, students identify examples of the first three components before making decisions about the overall tone and theme of the work. In small groups, students then discuss their findings and compare elements of the two poems. Ms. Berkowitz transitions to a larger class discussion by focusing on the differing tone and theme found in the poems and sharing how literary elements contribute to understanding the tone/theme.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
Analyzing Symbolism, Plot, and Theme in Death and the Miser
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students apply the analytical skills that they use when reading literature to an exploration of the underlying meaning and symbolism in Hieronymous BoschŐs early Renaissance painting "Death and the Miser".

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Literature
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
09/25/2013
The Art of Questioning: Content, Meaning and Style
Rating

Ms. Schaefer leads her 12th grade ELA students through a critical analysis of Atul Gawandes 'The Case of the Red Leg' through careful sequencing of questions.Initial questions ask students to react to the content of the text, forming and justifying their own opinions or perspective. This allows a maximum number of students to access the content and increases participation in the discussion. Questions then address the broader meaning of the text, using students understanding of the content to develop meaning and consider alternative points of view. Finally, questions focus on the style of writing and how stylistic elements contribute to the meaning found in the text.Structuring questions systematically gives students a tool for analyzing literature apart from the classroom so that their analysis is not dependent on teacher facilitation. Explicitly teaching students how to question is just as important as the analysis.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
English Language Arts, Grade 11
Conditions of Use:
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The 11th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 11th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Students move from learning the class rituals and routines and genre features of argument writing in Unit 11.1 to learning about narrative and informational genres in Unit 11.2: The American Short Story. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 11, The American Short Story
Conditions of Use:
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In this unit, students will explore great works of American literature and consider how writers reflect the time period in which they write. They will write two literary analysis papers and also work in groups to research and develop anthologies of excellent American stories.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and analyze stories from several 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century American authors. After researching a time period, they select stories from that period to create an anthology. The readings enhance their understanding of the short story, increase their exposure to well-known American authors, and allow them to examine the influence of social, cultural, and political context.
Students examine elements of short stories and have an opportunity for close reading of several American short stories. During these close readings, they examine the ways that short story writers attempt to explore the greater truths of the American experience through their literature.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

If you were to write a short story about this decade, what issues might you focus on?
What defines a short story? Just length?
To what extent do these stories reflect the era or decade in which they were written?
To what extent are the themes they address universal?

CLASSROOM FILMS

History.com has short videos on the Vietnam War (“Vietnam” and “A Soldier's Story”).

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, The American Short Story, "The Things They Carried", Essay Structure
Conditions of Use:
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In the final lesson in this episode, and as a warm-up for the final essay and project, students will discuss the organization of the student sample essay “The Search for Knowledge.”

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Heaven Or "Groundhog Day?"
Conditions of Use:
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This unit is designed to appeal to adolescents with its non-print text base, the movie "Groundhog Day". The pre-viewing activities prepare students for the allusions in the movie and include cultural literacy. The teacher can pick and choose from the activities to apply the concept of personal growth. The teacher may select from activities for science, workplace ethics, music, computer competency, and English language arts. The teacher may modify any of the attachments to suit the students' needs and interests. Students will: demonstrate accurate analysis of audience through appropriate choices in diction, motive support, point support, and non-print textual support; demonstrate knowledge of the concept of character qualities and reflect positive values. The content of the presentation must be persuasive and make connections between literary elements (plot development and dynamic characterization) and another discipline (psychology, science, vocational arts, or music).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Julia Millush
Date Added:
03/19/2000
Inquiry-Based Teaching: Asking Effective Questions
Rating

Sheila Kosoff joins fellow teachers, Adam Grumbach, Avram Barlowe and Terry Weber to reflect upon class discussion around a given text and how questioning facilitates a rigorous discussion. Avram talks about the importance of asking open-ended questions that invite multiple interpretations. Terry adds that effective questions sometimes allow students to explore the meaning of different words and notes that Sheila's comments encourage students to consider these multiple meanings. The group discusses how they determine whether or not they let students discover things themselves or draw their attention to specific ideas and consider how effective questioning helps students develop papers because they are better able to engage with the text. Out of this discussion, three components of effective questions are identified: askiing open-ended questions, inviting different interpretations and using questions to focus the debate.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
Inquiry Based Teaching: Discussing Fiction Texts
Rating

Sheila Kosoff, an Urban Academy Literature teacher, facilitates a discussion with her students about the main character in Nabokov's Lolita. Using an inquiry-based approach, Sheila asks students to consider the psychology of the main character, Humbert, as the novel progresses and as their perception of him changes. Students are encouraged to share their ideas and the discussion is shaped by students' responses and ideas. Sheila reflects on her preparation for the discussion and notes that she must over-prepare for class, reading and underlining the text so that she is ready for the discussion to take many different paths. She uses textual evidence to challenge student thinking, though it may not change their ideas or perspectives.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
Inquiry-Based Teaching: Discussing Literature
Rating

Students at Urban Academy High School share how they feel respected and valued at school. Sheila Kosoff, English teacher, talks about how she uses the inquiry approach to foster this culture of respect in which student voice is valued. Students are shown discussing Nabokay's Lolita. Sheila asks her class questions using specific passages from the text and guides the discussion by inviting student responses, making connections, and respecting different voices. Sheila says that teachers need to over-prepare when using the inquiry approach and be patient when soliciting responses from their students. As the discussion progresses, students cite evidence from the text, building arguments and expressing their opinions on the text. Sheila has students read passages from the text, reread, bring up questions, and form opinions. Sheila then talks about how she uses discussions to help prepare her students for writing.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
Inquiry-Based Teaching: Encouraging Student Voice
Rating

High school History teacher Avram Barlowe leads his class in a discussion of treason. Avram explains how students' comments and responses drive the content of his lessons and how he wants students to respond to texts both personally and analytically. Fellow teacher, Adam Grumbach points out how Avram poses questions to his students, taking one student comment and formulating two questions that differentiate and allow students to respond both personally and analytically. Throughout the video, we see Avram make conscious decisions during discussions that allow the students to determine the content of his class discussions.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
Inquiry-Based Teaching: Multiple Responses
Rating

In an effort to promote deeper analysis and understanding of multiple viewpoints, Urban Academy teachers discuss the conscious decisions they make to promote this type of discussion. The group reflects on how they structure discussions to highlight different perspectives and also rephrase and restate student comments to heighten differences in opinions and to draw out additional responses. In reacting and responding to these differences, students participate in a deeper analysis.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
Inquiry-Based Teaching: Powerful Ideas
Rating

Using an inquiry based approach has a profound effect on the depth and complexity of classroom discussions. In this video, students share how this is different than what they've previously experienced and we see teacher, Avram Barlowe, use primary source documents to drive discussions about freedom as it existed during Reconstruction following the Civil War. Recognizing that these documents describe both daily life and larger political and social ideas, Avram expects that the discussion will focus on both elements but will be largely driven by student comments and reactions to each text. In preparation for this inquiry based approach, Avram shares how he develops many questions that may never be used and must be ready to use students' comments and questions to facilitate the resulting discussion. Even though he knows ahead of time that there are specific issues that should be explored, he does not come into the discussion with specific answers or outcome for these issues. Avram sees the text as a vehicle in which the students can explore ideas that interest them and requires that students use multiple documents to challenge their thinking and extend their understanding of differing perspectives. In this way, students are prepared to not only discuss these ideas in this informal setting but are also prepared to read analytically and write about these ideas, considering multiple perspectives.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
Introduction to Fiction, Fall 2003
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Introduces prose narrative, both short stories and the novel. Examines the construction of narrative and the analysis of literary response. This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles--traditional and innovative, western and nonwestern--and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms. Toward the end of the term, we will be particularly concerned with the relationship between art and war in a diverse selection of works.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Literacy through Creative Dance
Rating

Ms. Patterson and Ms. Denis, high school ELA teachers at the East Bronx Academy for the Future, find a creative way to engage students and deepen their understanding as they study Edgar Allan Poes ŇThe BellsÓ. After reading the poem, student groups work to identify the literary devices used by the author and to identify elements such as mood and theme.Students look for inspiration from Poes written words and design a series of movements that will express the poem in the form of dance.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
Literary Analysis Through Interactive Stations
Rating

12th Grade ELA Teacher Daniel Wallace teaches a lesson on how a single idea in a text develops over time as the story unfolds. He explains that this is a concept with which students often struggle so he uses Interactive Stations to provide scaffolding. Working in small groups, students rotate through interactive stations such as the Wall of Silence in which they have a Ňwritten conversationÓ and the Power Tableau in which they experience a given idea both physically and emotionally.Each station takes approximately 5 minutes and provides a balance of written, verbal, physical, and emotional activities.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
Literary Analysis Tool: Character and Theme
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In this resource, students will be asked to use a graphic organizer in order to identify and track the development of theme and character in a literary text. Students will use evidence from the text to construct an evidence based response.

Subject:
Education
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Student Guide
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Erin Dorso
Brendan Johnson
Ambra Bryant
Sarah Reser
Bob Young
Date Added:
02/18/2016