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Child Welfare Practice in the Legal System: A Curriculum Module
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This module offers classroom instruction with the opportunity for students to observe child welfare workers, judges and referees, and attorneys during actual court proceedings. It provides approximately six hours of classroom content and addresses competencies in ethnic sensitive and multicultural practice, core child welfare skills, social work skills and methods, and workplace management. The curriculum provides a history of the system; cultural insights; background on the differing roles of professionals in the juvenile court setting; a glossary of court terms; and guidelines for proving maltreatment, and for providing effective testimony. (50 pages)Foster, D., & Woods, B. (1995).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/02/2018
Peter Donnelly Shows How Stats Fool Juries
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Oxford mathematician Peter Donnelly reveals the common mistakes humans make in interpreting statistics -- and the devastating impact these errors can have on the outcome of criminal trials. Peter Donnelly is an expert in probability theory who applies statistical methods to genetic data -- spurring advances in disease treatment and insight on our evolution. He's also an expert on DNA analysis, and an advocate for sensible statistical analysis in the courtroom. A quiz, thought provoking question, and links for further study are provided to create a lesson around the 11-minute video. Educators may use the platform to easily "Flip" or create their own lesson for use with their students of any age or level.

Subject:
Law
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
TED
Provider Set:
TED-Ed
Author:
Peter Donnelly
Date Added:
01/07/2007
Trials in History, Fall 2000
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Examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. Considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussion at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subject:
World History
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wood, Elizabeth A.
Date Added:
01/01/2000