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English Language Arts, Grade 11
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The 11th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 11th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Students move from learning the class rituals and routines and genre features of argument writing in Unit 11.1 to learning about narrative and informational genres in Unit 11.2: The American Short Story. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Revolution
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People often say that mankind should learn from history. Charles Dickens, whose books are considered classics, set his novel A Tale of Two Cities in the past. He wanted his readers to learn from the bloody French Revolution and from the widespread brutality in London. Both cities (Paris and London) offer the reader a glimpse into dark and dangerous times. As students read about Dickens's Victorian setting and learn his view of the French Revolution, they will think about what makes a just world. Students will have a chance to think about their own experiences, and, using techniques they have learned from Charles Dickens, they will do some writing that sends a message about your own world.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

To complete the unit accomplishments, students will:

Read the Charles Dickens novel A Tale of Two Cities.
Read several short pieces, including a biography of Dickens and excerpts from other literature, to help them understand Dickens’s world and the world of the novel.
Explore new vocabulary to build their ability to write and speak using academic language.
Practice close reading and participate in several role plays and dramatic readings to help them experience the dramatic writing style of Charles Dickens.
Write a vignette and a short narrative piece, and practice using descriptive detail and precise language.
Write a reflection about the meaning of Dickens’s novel.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How does good storytelling affect the reader, and how can a good story promote change in the world?
What was the Victorian view of gender roles?
How can power be abused?
What is loyalty ? What are the limits of loyalty?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Revolution, The Rebels, The Storming of The Bastille
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In this lesson, students will review the storming of the Bastille and the actions of the Revolutionaries in these chapters, paying particular attention to the ways in which Dickens represents the women who have become rebels.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Identifying Irony
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Students will be able to distinguish between the 3 types of Irony within a reading passage
Students will use close reading skills to identify literary elements within a text
Students will be able to assess the language within a passage to determine which type of irony is being used

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Lindsay Nunan
Date Added:
07/13/2017
Introduction to Irony
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Students will be introduced to irony with a focus on the three types of irony:  verbal, situational, and dramatic.  RL 8.4  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.Students will review the definitions of the three types of irony.  After viewing examples and taking notes, they will view three videos:  verbal irony, situational irony, and dramatic irony.Students will get a copy of the lyrics to the song "Ironic" by Alanis Morissette.  They will listen to the song a few times.and highlight examples of irony. Students will then work with a partner to share and discuss.  Next, students will type their own song lyrics using the song "Ironic" as a template portraying examples of irony.Students will then share with the class.  During presentations, students will highlight examples of irony using classmates' lyrics.  

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Dr. Diane Schnoebelen-Kramer
Date Added:
04/14/2017
Metamorphosis — Stories of Change
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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The goal of this activity is for students to learn how to tell a story in order to make a complex topic (such as global warming or ozone holes) easier for a reader to grasp. Students realize that the narrative impulse underlies even scientific and technical writing and gain a better understanding of the role of myth as a "science" of imagination that helps us to gain insight into human motivation.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise Carlson
Jane Evenson
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Neighbours, Asia/Pacific: Neighbours
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Neighbours explores the concepts of neighbourhood and being neighbourly through narrative, poetry and a factual text. Unit elements include an overview, description of focus, teaching and learning activities, and links to the Australian Curriculum. The unit explores the global citizenship topic of neighbourliness, with a focus on Australia's nearest international neighbours through the Australian Curriculum: English, and strands of language, literature and literacy, applied to a range of texts and text types.

Subject:
Language Education (ESL)
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Primary English Teaching Association Australia (PETAA)
Provider Set:
Global Words
Author:
Gray, Mary
Date Added:
04/03/2012
The Oregon State Guide to English Literary Terms
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This free video series provides definitions of literary terms in English literature to students and teachers. It also offers examples of how these literary devices can be applied to poems, plays, novels, and short stories. We are in the process of translating the videos into Spanish and many of them now contain these subtitles.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Oregon State University
School of Writing Literature and Film
Date Added:
03/06/2020
Situational Irony: The Opposite of What You Think
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TED Video: Leaps and bounds separate that which is ironic and that which many people simply say is ironic. Christopher Warner wants to set the record straight: Something is ironic if and only if it is the exact opposite of what you would expect.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
TED
Provider Set:
TED-Ed
Author:
Christopher Warner
Date Added:
11/23/2016
Theme and Situational Irony-"The Interlopers" by Saki
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"The Interlopers" by Saki (H.H. Munroe) is a story that portrays the theme of hatred resulting in tragedy. This story also has several examples of situational irony which is the contrast between what is said or expected and what actually happens.  Three examples of irony will be discussed and how they are significant to the theme.  The examples are:1.  The men die over something unimportant.2.  The struggle for land ownership ends in a tragedy when nature takes their lives.3.  The long running feud ended, but no one in the village/town could learn of that as both men died.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Dr. Diane Schnoebelen-Kramer
Date Added:
04/29/2017
The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig
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A lesson plan that compares a traditional story with a non-traditional one while looking at key details in the stories.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Date Added:
07/12/2014
Verbal Irony
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At face value, the lines between verbal irony, sarcasm, and compliments can be blurry. After all, the phrase 'That looks nice' could be all three depending on the circumstances. In the final of a three part series on irony, Christopher Warner gets into the irony you may use most often and most casually: verbal irony.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TED
Provider Set:
TED-Ed
Author:
Christopher Warner
Date Added:
04/01/2017