Updating search results...

Search Resources

23 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • Hydrophobic
Aerogels in Action
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Students experiment with a new material—aerogel. Aerogel is a synthetic (human-made) porous ultra-light (low-density) material, in which the liquid component of a gel is replaced with a gas. In this activity, student pairs use aerogel to simulate the environmental engineering application of cleaning up oil spills. In a simple and fun way, this activity incorporates density calculations, the material effects of surface area, and hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Claudia K. Gunsch
Desiree L. Plata
Lauren K. Redfern
Osman Karatüm
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Biology
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Biology is designed for multi-semester biology courses for science majors. It is grounded on an evolutionary basis and includes exciting features that highlight careers in the biological sciences and everyday applications of the concepts at hand. To meet the needs of today’s instructors and students, some content has been strategically condensed while maintaining the overall scope and coverage of traditional texts for this course. Instructors can customize the book, adapting it to the approach that works best in their classroom. Biology also includes an innovative art program that incorporates critical thinking and clicker questions to help students understand—and apply—key concepts.

Subject:
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
08/22/2012
Biology, The Cell, Structure and Function of Plasma Membranes, Components and Structure
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

By the end of this section, you will be able to:Understand the fluid mosaic model of cell membranesDescribe the functions of phospholipids, proteins, and carbohydrates in membranesDiscuss membrane fluidity

Subject:
Applied Science
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
07/10/2017
Biology, The Chemistry of Life, The Chemical Foundation of Life, Water
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

By the end of this section, you will be able to:Describe the properties of water that are critical to maintaining lifeExplain why water is an excellent solventProvide examples of water’s cohesive and adhesive propertiesDiscuss the role of acids, bases, and buffers in homeostasis

Subject:
Applied Science
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
07/10/2017
Remix
Biology, The Chemistry of Life, The Chemical Foundation of Life, Water
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

By the end of this section, you will be able to:Describe the properties of water that are critical to maintaining lifeExplain why water is an excellent solventProvide examples of water’s cohesive and adhesive propertiesDiscuss the role of acids, bases, and buffers in homeostasis

Subject:
Applied Science
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Author:
Tina B. Jones
Date Added:
08/26/2019
Density Column Lab - Part 2
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Concluding a two-part lab activity, students use triple balance beams and graduated cylinders to take measurements and calculate densities of several household liquids and compare them to the densities of irregularly shaped objects (as determined in Part 1). Then they create density columns with the three liquids and four solid items to test their calculations and predictions of the different densities. Once their density columns are complete, students determine the effect of adding detergent to the columns. After this activity, present the associated Density & Miscibility lesson for a discussion about why the column layers do not mix.

Subject:
Engineering
Life Science
Mathematics
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Barry Williams
Jessica Ray
Phyllis Balcerzak
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Density & Miscibility
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

After students conduct the two associated activities, Density Column Lab - Parts 1 and 2, present this lesson to provide them with an understanding of why the density column's oil, water and syrup layers do not mix and how the concepts of density and miscibility relate to water chemistry and remediation. Topics covered include miscibility, immiscibility, hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic and hydrophilic. Through the density column lab activities, students see liquids and solids of different densities interact without an understanding of why the resulting layers do not mix. This lesson gives students insight on some of the most fundamental chemical properties of water and how it interacts with different molecules.

Subject:
Engineering
Chemistry
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Barry Williams
Jessica Ray
Phyllis Balcerzak
Date Added:
09/18/2014
The Great Pacific Garbage Patch
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP) is an intriguing and publicized environmental problem. This swirling soup of trash up to 10 meters deep and just below the water surface is composed mainly of non-degradable plastics. These plastic materials trap aquatic life and poison them by physical blockage or as carriers of toxic pollutants. The problem relates to materials science and the advent of plastics in modern life, an example of the unintended consequences of technology. Through exploring this complex issue, students gain insight into aspects of chemistry, oceanography, fluids, environmental science, life science and even international policy. As part of the GIS unit, the topic is a source of content for students to create interesting maps communicating something that they will likely begin to care about as they learn more.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Andrey Koptelov
Nathan Howell
Date Added:
09/18/2014
How Big is Small
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In this classic hands-on activity, learners estimate the length of a molecule by floating a fatty acid (oleic acid) on water. This lab asks learners to record measurements and make calculations related to volume, diameter, area, and height. Learners also convert meters into nanometers. Includes teacher and student worksheets but lacks in depth procedure information. The author suggests educators search the web for more complete lab instructions.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Author:
Eric Muller
The Exploratorium
Date Added:
11/07/2007
Investigating Contact Angle
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Students observe how water acts differently when placed on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. They determine which coatings are best to cause surfaces to shed water quickly or reduce the "fogging" caused by condensation.

Subject:
Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Jean Stave
Professor Chuan-Hua Chen
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Is Water Wet?
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson includes a lab that has students differentiating between hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and is designed for a 7th-grade science class in Indiana.  Teacher-developed resources are attached for student use.  

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Integrated Nanosystems Development Institute (INDI)
Date Added:
07/01/2021
Oil on the Ocean
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Students learn about oil spills and their environmental and economic effects. They experience the steps of the engineering design process as they brainstorm potential methods for oil spill clean-up, and then design, build, and re-design oil booms to prevent the spread of oil spills. During a reflective session after cleaning up their oil booms, students come up with ideas on how to reduce oil consumption to prevent future oil spills.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Berkeley Almand
Carleigh Samson
Janet Yowell
Kristen Brown
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Melissa Straten
Sharon D. Perez-Suarez
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Penny Perfect Properties (Solid-Liquid Interactions)
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Students investigate the property dependence between liquid and solid interfaces and determine observable differences in how liquids react to different solid surfaces. They compare copper pennies and plastic "coins" as the two test surfaces. Using an eye dropper to deliver various fluids onto the surfaces, students determine the volume and mass of a liquid that can sit on the surface. They use rulers, scales, equations of volume and area, and other methods of approximation and observation, to make their own graphical interpretations of trends. They apply what they learned to design two super-surfaces (from provided surface treatment materials) that arecapable of holding the most liquid by volume and by mass. Cost of materials is a parameter in their design decisions.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Courtney Herring
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Superhydrophobicity: The Lotus Effect
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Students are introduced to superhydrophobic surfaces and the "lotus effect." Water spilled on a superhydrophobic surface does not wet the surface, but simply rolls off. Additionally, as water moves across the superhydrophobic surface, it picks up and carries away any foreign material, such as dust or dirt. Students learn how plants create and use superhydrophobic surfaces in nature and how engineers have created human-made products that mimic the properties of these natural surfaces. They also learn about the tendency of all superhydrophobic surfaces to develop water droplets that do not roll off the surface but become "pinned" under certain conditions, such as water droplets formed from condensation. They see how the introduction of mechanical energy can "unpin" these water droplets and restore the desirable properties of the superhydrophobic surface.

Subject:
Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Chuan-Hua Chen
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Surfactants: Helping Molecules Get Along
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Students learn about the basics of molecules and how they interact with each other. They learn about the idea of polar and non-polar molecules and how they act with other fluids and surfaces. Students acquire a conceptual understanding of surfactant molecules and how they work on a molecular level. They also learn of the importance of surfactants, such as soaps, and their use in everyday life. Through associated activities, students explore how surfactant molecules are able to bring together two substances that typically do not mix, such as oil and water. This lesson and its associated activities are easily scalable for grades 3-12.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Ryan Cates
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Tension Racers!
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Students see how different levels of surface tension affect water's ability to move. Teams "race" water droplets down tracks made of different materials, making measurements, collecting data, making calculations, graphing results and comparing to their predictions and the properties of each surface, determining which surface exhibits the highest (or lowest) level of surface tension with water. They apply their results to make engineering recommendations for real-world applications.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Mathematics
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Ryan Cates
Date Added:
09/18/2014