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Cultural and Literary Expression in the English Renaissance
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At the outset of the 16th century, Europeans tended to dismiss English literature as inferior to continental literary traditions; the educated Englishman was obliged to travel to the continent and speak in other languages in order to culture himself. By the end of the Renaissance, however, some of the greatest works in the English language from Shakespeare's dramas to Thomas More's Utopia had been written. In this course, the student will read and examine these works, situating them within their socio-historical and literary contexts, while attempting to determine how the art of English language and letters came into its own during this dynamic period. (English Literature 202)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Religious Studies
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Full Course
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The Saylor Foundation
Early Globalizations: East Meets West (1200s-1600s)
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the world's major civilizations from medieval times to the early modern era. The student will learn about the pivotal political, economic, and social changes that took place in Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Europe during this period. By the end of the course, the student will understand how many different civilizations evolved from isolated societies into expansive, interconnected empires capable of exerting global influence. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: Think critically and analytically about world history in the medieval and early modern eras; Identify and describe the emergence, decline, and main features of the Byzantine Empire; Identify the origins and characteristics of the European medieval period and describe the rapidly changing forces at work in society, the economy, and religion during this time; Identify the origins of the Aztec and Inca civilizations and assess how these empires affected socio-economic development in the Americas; Identify the origins of the Tang and Song dynasties in China and assess the impact of these empires on Chinese government, society, religion, and economy during what scholars refer to as the 'golden age'; Identify the origins of the Mongol Empire, which dominated much of Asia in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Students will analyze the nature of this empire created by nomads; Identify the reasons for a changing balance in the world economy in the 1400s and analyze why Europe superseded Asia as the most dominant civilization on the globe; Assess how and why the European Age of Discovery had such a large impact on the New World, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia; Identify the origins and characteristics of the Renaissance and describe its impact on European civilization as a whole; Identify the origins of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in Europe and assess how this movement altered the social, political, and religious fabric of Europe; Identify the origins of colonial Brazil and New Spain. Students will also be able to assess the impact of Spanish and Portuguese colonization on the New World, Africa, and Europe; Identify the origins of the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires and assess the unique characteristics of these dynasties and their impact upon Asia and the world; Identify the origins of the Atlantic slave trade, assessing how this forced migration of peoples affected Africa, Africans, Europe, and the New World; Analyze and describe the Asian trading world, the Ming dynasty in China, the ĺÎĺĺĺŤwarring states,' and early modern eras in Japan; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the medieval period to the early modern era using historical research methods. (History 221)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Economics
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The Saylor Foundation
History of Europe, 1000 to 1800
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This course will introduce the student to the history of Europe from the medieval period to the Age of Revolutions in the eighteenth century. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in Europe during this 800-year period including the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, European expansion overseas, and the French Revolution. By the end of the course, the student will understand how Europe had transformed from a fragmented and volatile network of medieval polities into a series of independent nation-states by 1800. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Think critically and analytically about European history in the medieval and early modern eras; Identify and describe the religious, intellectual, social, and political components of the European Middle Ages; Identify the origins and characteristics of the Italian and Northern European Renaissance, as well as describe new developments in art, philosophy, religion, architecture, and science during the era of ĺÎĺĺĺŤrebirthĄ_ĺĺö; Identify and describe the causes and effects of the European Age of Discovery. Students will also be able to analyze the impact of overseas expansion on European monarchies, the world economy, and indigenous peoples; Describe and analyze the Protestant Reformation. Students will be able to identify the origins of the movement, the various inflections of the Reformation across Europe, and the Catholic Counter Reformation; Identify the era of religious warfare that plagued Europe after the Protestant Reformation. Students will analyze causes and effects of the religious conflicts that erupted in France, England, the Netherlands, and the Holy Roman Empire; Identify and explain why and how 'absolute' monarchs gained power in western Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Students will also be able to identify and describe why two nations - England and the Netherlands - embraced constitutionalism rather than absolutism; Assess how and why absolutism characterized the monarchies of Prussia and Austria in the 1600s. Students will also be able to identify and describe the development of Russia and the reign of Peter the Great; Identify the origins and characteristics of the Scientific Revolution, as well as describe its impact on European civilization as a whole; Identify the origins of the European Enlightenment and assess how this movement altered the social, political, and religious fabric of Europe; Identify and describe the social and economic changes that swept across Europe during the eighteenth century. Students will be able to assess the origin and impact of the 'agricultural revolution,' the marked increase in Europe's population, the development of 'cottage industries,' the rise of the Atlantic economy, and the changes in domestic and religious practices; Identify and describe the origins and impact of the French Revolution. Students will also be able to analyze the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the Middle Ages to the eighteenth century, using historical research methods. (History 201)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
The Italian Proto-Renaissance To Mannerism
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The student will focus on becoming literate in the art of the Italian Renaissance, on identifying the effects that the Renaissance had on the arts of Italy, and discovering the ways in which specific historical developments impacted those arts from the end of the thirteenth century to the end of the sixteenth century. The Renaissance, a European phenomenon that began to develop in the late thirteenth century, refers to a marked shift in the ways in which individuals perceived their world. A new outlook was emerging that was characterized by, among other things, increased humanism and a renewed interest in the cultures of Classical Antiquity (and all within a Christian framework). There is no specific date that marks the beginning of the Renaissance, but its burgeoning effects on art can be detected earlier in Italy than in other areas. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Define the term Renaissance and identify its modes of expression in the art of Italy; Place the major artistic developments of Italian Renaissance art along a timeline and characterize the art of different periods within the Renaissance; Situate different artists, artworks, and artistic practices within their respective regions or cities; Explain how specific historical contexts, events, and figures affected Italian Renaissance art; Describe specificities in interests and style as they apply to the work of important artists of the Renaissance; Recognize important artworks and describe them in terms of their form, content, and general history of their creation; Explain the role of art and artists during the Renaissance in Italy; Discuss specific artistic techniques used during the Renaissance in Italy. (Art History 206)

Subject:
Art History
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Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Medieval Europe
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the European Middle Ages and Renaissance. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place between the fourth century and 1500 CE. By the end of the course, the student will understand how Europe transformed from a collection of barbarian kingdoms into a continent with a sophisticated cultural and economic life that would later come to dominate the globe. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: think analytically about the history of the European Middle Ages from the fourth century to approximately 1500; identify and describe the causes for the dissolution of the Roman Empire and the end of antiquity; identify and describe the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire as well as the creation of Germanic kingdoms in the former western Roman Empire; identify and describe the impact of Christianity on Byzantium and the Germanic tribes; identify and describe the causes of the rise of the Carolingian Empire and its impact on Europe; identify and analyze the causes for the rising power of feudal medieval kingdoms; identify and describe the role of the medieval Church as well as the causes and effects of the Crusades; analyze and describe the system of feudalism in medieval Europe; identify the medieval roots of the Renaissance and analyze its impact on European society; identify the major cultural, scientific, and economic achievements of medieval civilization; analyze and interpret primary source documents from the fourth century to 1500, and demonstrate an understanding of the difference between primary and secondary sources. (History 302)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
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Lecture Notes
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Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Psychology
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Psychology is designed to meet scope and sequence requirements for the single-semester introduction to psychology course. The book offers a comprehensive treatment of core concepts, grounded in both classic studies and current and emerging research. The text also includes coverage of the DSM-5 in examinations of psychological disorders. Psychology incorporates discussions that reflect the diversity within the discipline, as well as the diversity of cultures and communities across the globe.Senior Contributing AuthorsRose M. Spielman, Formerly of Quinnipiac UniversityContributing AuthorsKathryn Dumper, Bainbridge State CollegeWilliam Jenkins, Mercer UniversityArlene Lacombe, Saint Joseph's UniversityMarilyn Lovett, Livingstone CollegeMarion Perlmutter, University of Michigan

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Psychology, Introduction to Psychology, History of Psychology
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By the end of this section, you will be able to:Understand the importance of Wundt and James in the development of psychologyAppreciate Freud’s influence on psychologyUnderstand the basic tenets of Gestalt psychologyAppreciate the important role that behaviorism played in psychology’s historyUnderstand basic tenets of humanismUnderstand how the cognitive revolution shifted psychology’s focus back to the mind 

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Psychology, Introduction to Psychology, Introduction
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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Opening image caption:Psychology is the scientific study of mind and behavior. (credit "background": modification of work by Nattachai Noogure; credit "top left": modification of work by U.S. Navy; credit "top middle-left": modification of work by Peter Shanks; credit "top middle-right": modification of work by "devinf"/Flickr; credit "top right": modification of work by Alejandra Quintero Sinisterra; credit "bottom left": modification of work by Gabriel Rocha; credit "bottom middle-left": modification of work by Caleb Roenigk; credit "bottom middle-right": modification of work by Staffan Scherz; credit "bottom right": modification of work by Czech Provincial Reconstruction Team)Psychology is designed to meet scope and sequence requirements for the single-semester introduction to psychology course. The book offers a comprehensive treatment of core concepts, grounded in both classic studies and current and emerging research. The text also includes coverage of the DSM-5 in examinations of psychological disorders. Psychology incorporates discussions that reflect the diversity within the discipline, as well as the diversity of cultures and communities across the globe.

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Psychotherapy
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Psychotherapy refers to the practices clinical psychologists use to treat mental disorders. While 'therapy' can denote any intervention undertaken with the goal of healing someone (including medicinal treatments for physical problems), psychotherapy is specific in that it uses certain cognitive, behavioral, and emotional regulation techniques. Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to: Define psychotherapy and describe the historical development of its practice; Identify the qualities most useful in a psychotherapist; Discuss the different ways in which psychotherapy affects both patient/client and counselor/therapist; Describe how each theory/therapy conceptualizes a) human nature, b) psychopathology, and c) the therapeutic change process; Identify the major therapeutic techniques used to promote change in each type of therapy; Compare and contrast individual theories/therapies with family theories/therapies; Describe a) the important historical figures associated with each theory and b) the historical context in which the theory emerged.

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Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Theories of Personality
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Personality psychology is the study of the development of personality, the effects of personality on important outcomes, and maladaptive personality characteristics. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify research methodologies involved in the science of personality psychology; Describe the purpose of comprehensive clinical theories in the field of personality psychology; Compare and contrast major classical theories of personality (i.e., humanism, psychoanalytic/psychodynamic, behaviorism, cognitive, and social-cognitive theories of personality); Describe the main concerns of trait theorists, the influential figures who helped develop this perspective, and the sequential development leading up to the current understanding of traits; Define the main components of the five-factor model of personality; Identify the theory, methodology, and main findings of the empirical journal articles assigned; Describe the important contributions of the biological/evolutionary perspective made to personality psychology; Describe the intrapersonal and interpersonal function of emotion as an expression of personality. (Psychology 405)

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
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Reading
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Provider:
The Saylor Foundation