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1897 Petition Against the Annexation of Hawaii
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

This site recounts the struggle for control of Hawaii between native Hawaiians and American business interests in the late 1800s. This 1897 petition and a lobbying effort by native Hawaiians convinced the U.S. Congress not to annex the islands. But months later the U.S.S. Maine exploded in Havana and the Spanish-American War began. The U.S. needed a mid-Pacific fueling station and naval base.

Primary source images, standards correlation, and teaching activities are included in this resource.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Date Added:
08/24/2007
1c. Historians and Their Time
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Herodotus, the first historian, claimed modest goals for his work: "that the doings of men may not be forgotten." On the title page he wrote Historia, Greek for "inquiries" or "researches." Inquiring into the past has been called history ever since.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
Date Added:
12/05/2014
The 26th Amendment
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating

This lesson explores the most recent constitutional expansion of voting rights: extending them to people between 18 and 21 years of age. Students will read the 26th Amendment and learn about its history. They will view an NBC report from Nov. 5, 2008, that explains how important the youth vote was to the election of Barack Obama. Finally, they will examine the results of a recent study showing that young voters have very different concerns than older voters, and hypothesize about how young voters might affect elections in 2012 and beyond.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
11/28/2016
3rd Grade History Unit Design: Native Americans of North America
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This unit on American Indians: By studying the regions of the United States and the cultures that live in each region, students are able to compare/contrast within regions and across regions how tribes used their environments, and their cultural and other contributions to American life.

Note that the emphasis here is on broader groups of tribes for each region with some instruction on specific tribes representing each region. In no way is this case study approach to learning about one tribe meant to be generalized to all tribes of that region. We understand that each tribe was and continues to be unique in its culture, practices, lifeways, and traditions.

Subject:
World Cultures
Elementary Education
U.S. History
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Leslie Heffernan
Date Added:
10/23/2019
7. Africa
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Upon Africa's soils our prehistoric relatives have walked side by side. From its territories, great civilizations have risen to glory. Through its peoples, astounding cultures have grown and flourished. Yet many myths remain about Africa.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
Date Added:
12/05/2014
9a. The Middle Kingdom
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

From the misty veil of prehistory emerged the myths of ancient China. Heroes turned to gods, and men and beasts performed miraculous feats. Their myths explain the discoveries of the tools and practices used by the Chinese to the present-day.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
Date Added:
12/05/2014
Activism in the US
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

The United States has a long history of activists seeking social, political, economic, and other changes to America—along with a history of other activists trying to prevent such changes. American activism covered a wide range of causes and utilized many different forms of activism. American sociopolitical activism became especially prominent during the period of societal upheaval which began during the 1950s. The African American civil rights movement led the way, soon followed by a substantial anti-war movement opposing American involvement in the Vietnam War, and later by vigorous activism involving women’s issues, gay rights, and other causes. The United States remains a land of nearly constant change, and activists play a significant role in the ongoing evolution of American democracy. It seems likely that Americans will remain enthusiastic activists in the future. This exhibition is part of the Digital Library of Georgia.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Library of Georgia
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
Ad Access: Train Advertisements
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Rating

The Ad*Access Project presents images and database information advertisements printed in U.S. and Canadian newspapers and magazines between 1911 and 1955. This selection of ads is about trains.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Duke University
Provider Set:
Duke University Libraries
Date Added:
03/24/2014
The African-American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
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Rating

This site explores the diversity and complexity of African-American culture in Ohio. These manuscripts, texts, and images focus on themes that include slavery, emancipation, abolition, the Underground Railroad, the Civil War, Reconstruction, African Americans in politics and government, and African-American religion.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
American Memory
Date Added:
06/30/2000
African American History: From Emancipation to the Present
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

The purpose of this course is to examine the African American experience in the United States from 1863 to the present. Prominent themes include the end of the Civil War and the beginning of Reconstruction; African Americans' urbanization experiences; the development of the modern civil rights movement and its aftermath; and the thought and leadership of Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr., and Malcolm X. WARNING: Some of the lectures in this course contain graphic content and/or adult language that some users may find disturbing.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Jonathan Holloway
Date Added:
04/30/2012
America, A Home for Every Culture
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students will discuss and explore the cultures that have contributed to making the United States the unique and diverse country it is today.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Kennedy Center ARTSEDGE
Provider Set:
ARTSEDGE
Author:
Rebecca Haden
Date Added:
10/10/2010
America Through Media
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Historians learn about the past in many ways. Political and legal documents, economic statistics, film and video footage of events, material items such as tools and clothing, literature, songs, movies: all of these leftovers from previous eras help historians piece together the different ways that societies change over time. This interactive textbook is designed to help students understand America in the twentieth century through examination of the media produced in that era. Such explorations into the past are called cultural history, which has been defined by the Yale University Department of History as “an effort to inhabit the minds of the people of different worlds.”

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MassBay Community College
Author:
Jill Silos-Rooney
Date Added:
05/13/2019
America during the 1918 Influenza Pandemic
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In the spring of 1918, the United States was embroiled in World War I, fighting alongside the English, French, and Russians against the Central Powers of Germany and Austria-Hungary. In total, 70 million men were at war on multiple fronts across Europe, Russia, the Middle East, and Northern Africa. The tide was finally turning for the Allies after a crushing offensive by German forces mere weeks earlier. Then, a fierce enemy intervened—an outbreak of influenza that would decimate entire regiments and towns, kill civilians and soldiers alike by the millions, and rapidly become a global pandemic. This disease weakened forces on both sides, changing not only the course of the war but also the economies and population stability of every affected nation. In the long term, this particular outbreak would inspire research on an unprecedented scale and lead to advances in science and medicine, forever altering our understanding of epidemiology. From the spring of 1918 to early 1919, no aspect of life remained untouched by the pandemic for Americans at home and on the front. This exhibition explores the pandemic’s impact on American life.  This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Digital Curation Program by the following students as part of Dr. Joan E. Beaudoin's course "Metadata in Theory and Practice" in the School of Library and Information Science at Wayne State University: Bethany Campbell, Michelle John, Samantha Reid-Goldberg, Anne Sexton, and John Weimer.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Wayne State University
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Anne Sexton
Bethany Campbell
John Weimer
Michelle John
Samantha Reid-Goldberg
Date Added:
04/01/2015
American Egyptomania
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This website is devoted to exploring American fascination with Egypt and its history. Primary Source documents can be found by browsing the Historical Sources page or by searching through the advanced search page. Secondary literature that addresses topics such as art & architecture, history, literature, religion, and science can be browsed through the scholarship page. The web resources page contains a list of helpful websites related to the topics of the site and the search page is an advanced search that allows users to search for specific items and articles.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
George Mason University
Provider Set:
Center for History and New Media
Author:
Scott Trafton
Date Added:
02/16/2011
American Memory from the Library of Congress
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Rating

American Memory provides free and open access through the Internet to written and spoken words, sound recordings, still and moving images, prints, maps, and sheet music that document the American experience. It is a digital record of American history and creativity. These materials, from the collections of the Library of Congress and other institutions, chronicle historical events, people, places, and ideas that continue to shape America, serving the public as a resource for education and lifelong learning.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
American Memory
Date Added:
04/25/2013
America's Founding: Why Our Founding Fathers Risked It All
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Have you ever stopped to think about the incredible risks the Founding Founders took when they rebelled against British authority? They were starting a war with the greatest military power of the time even though they did not have a mighty fighting force themselves. And they were fighting for a type of government that most people thought was impossible. In this video mini-course, Professor Sarah Burns of the Rochester Institute of Technology explains the historical and philosophical context of the American Revolution from the changing role of the British army in the colonies to Radical Whig theory.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Sarah Burns
Date Added:
07/04/2016
Ancient Civilizations
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

To borrow from Dr. Seuss's book title, "Oh the Places You'll Go! Here's a coming attraction of the people, places, ideas, and things coming at you: Your 3.2 million-year-old human ancestor Lucy, mummies, pyramids, Cleopatra, "an eye for an eye", the birth of major religions Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism, the birth of democracy, the first Olympics, Julius Caesar, gladiators, the invention of writing, paper, and the wheel, kingdoms built of stone in Africa, the Great Wall of China, the introduction of such concepts as zero, time, and monotheism (the belief in one god), Samurai, martial arts, palaces of gold, and even the Sphinx. Whew! The study of ancient civilizations and people raises some profound questions. Who are humans? Where did we come from? Where are we going? As you explore these civilizations, see if you can make sense of this Sphinxlike statement from author William Faulkner: "The past ...

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
ushistory.org
Date Added:
10/03/2016
Ancient History Encyclopedia
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

Ancient History Encyclopedia is a non-profit educational website with a global vision: to provide the best ancient history information on the internet for free.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Reading
Provider:
Ancient History Encyclopedia
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
04/23/2013