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Building Fractions Game
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In this math lesson, learners investigate fractions by playing a game. To ...

In this math lesson, learners investigate fractions by playing a game. To play, learners roll two dice and create a fraction, using the larger number rolled as the denominator and the smaller number as the numerator. Learners then build that fractional amount on the game mat with pattern block pieces. The winner is the player who builds the greatest number of hexagons.

Subject:
Education
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Games
Instructional Material
Lesson Plans
Provider:
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
Utah Education Network
Utah LessonPlans
Fantastic Fractions
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In this math lesson, learners compare pattern blocks to visually understand halves, ...

In this math lesson, learners compare pattern blocks to visually understand halves, thirds, and sixths. First, learners look at all the different ways they can make a hexagon using other pattern block pieces. After the investigation, they represent their solutions using pictures and fractional notation. Then, learners play a game to increase their understanding of equivalence and fractions. The game can be played on its own--with or without the preceding lesson.

Subject:
Education
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Games
Instructional Material
Lesson Plans
Provider:
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
Utah Education Network
Utah LessonPlans
Hexagon
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A web page and interactive applet illustrating the properties of a hexagon ...

A web page and interactive applet illustrating the properties of a hexagon (6 sided polygon). The applet shows a hexagon where the user can drag any vertex to reshape it. User can see that the interior and exterior angles are constant in a regular hexagon, but vary in an irregular version. Controls allow the display or hiding of the diagonals, and triangles within the hexagon. The web page lists the properties of a hexagon including interior angles, exterior angles, sum of exterior angles, area, number of diagonals and number of internal triangles. Links to pages with generalized properties of all polygons. Applet can be enlarged to full screen size for use with a classroom projector. This resource is a component of the Math Open Reference Interactive Geometry textbook project at http://www.mathopenref.com.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Readings
Simulations
Provider:
Math Open Reference
Provider Set:
Math Open Reference
Author:
John Page
Hexagonal Pattern of Beehives
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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The goal of this task is to use geometry study the structure ...

The goal of this task is to use geometry study the structure of beehives. Beehives have a tremendous simplicity as they are constructed entirely of small, equally sized walls. In order to as useful as possible for the hive, the goal should be to create the largest possible volume using the least amount of materials. In other words, the ratio of the volume of each cell to its surface area needs to be maximized. This then reduces to maximizing the ratio of the surface area of the cell shape to its perimeter.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Patterns and Relationships: Struts 'n Stuff
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In this math lesson, learners identify the relationship between the number of ...

In this math lesson, learners identify the relationship between the number of sides in a regular polygon and the number of struts needed to make each polygon rigid. Learners build polygons using strips of paper and paper fasteners to explore the attributes of triangles, rectangles, pentagons, and hexagons. From their explorations, learners discern that triangles form the only rigid polygon. Learners are then challenged to determine the least number of struts or supports they would need to add to the rectangles, pentagons, and hexagons to make them rigid. Learners record their findings in a chart and look for patterns. They use the pattern to state a rule that shows the relationship between the number of sides in a polygon and the number of struts needed to make it rigid. To further reinforce these concepts, learners make a graph showing this relationship. Learners use the graph to predict the number of struts needed to make different polygons rigid. Finally, the group discusses the relationship between the number of sides of a polygon and the number of triangles formed by the struts. Learners look for a pattern in order to make a generalization.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Lesson Plans
Provider:
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
PBS
US Department of Education
Problem Solving: Logic Number Puzzles
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These logic number puzzles help students develop strong number sense as they ...

These logic number puzzles help students develop strong number sense as they work, clue by clue, to identify the digits of the missing number. The mixed-skills clues incorporate even-odd, less than-greater than, operations (sum, difference), multiples of 5 and 10, geometric terms (octagaon, pentagon, hexagon, quadrilateral, trapezoid, parallelogram), money (quarters, nickels) and measurement (cup, pint, quart, gallon). Students must squeeze every bit of knowledge from each clue to eliminate possible digits until they finally identify the missing digits.

Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Games
Lesson Plans
Provider:
Mathwire
Author:
Terry Kawas
Solidly Platonic
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In this activity, learners follow simple directions to explore and create platonic ...

In this activity, learners follow simple directions to explore and create platonic solids. Learners count the number of faces, edges, and vertices in the structures they make out of paper and look for patterns, which they'll discover can be defined by Euler's formula.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Provider:
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
Julie Yu
National Science Foundation
The Exploratorium
Tiling the Plaza
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In this math lesson, learners arrange pattern blocks to create tessellations and ...

In this math lesson, learners arrange pattern blocks to create tessellations and to explore geometric patterns. Learners first explore making patterns with a variety of pattern blocks. They next engage in experiments of making tile designs using only one shape by rotating that shape around a point. Finally, they are faced with the situation of entering a contest for creating the best tile design for the new plaza using these geometric shapes. Learners are placed into groups and are told to use only the blocks with equal sides and equal angles to create a patterned tile design. Each group makes a tile design and learners vote for the best design.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Lesson Plans
Provider:
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
PBS
US Department of Education
Tiny Tubes
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In this activity, learners make "totally tubular" forms of carbon. Learners use ...

In this activity, learners make "totally tubular" forms of carbon. Learners use chicken wire to build macro models of carbon nanotubes. Depending on how they roll the wire, they will discover three different forms of nanotubes, each with different properties. Learners can also make a paper buckyball by downloading the linked template.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Life Science
Mathematics
Geometry
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Data
Instructional Material
Provider:
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
Julie Yu
National Science Foundation
The Exploratorium