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  • Henry David Thoreau
Examining Transcendentalism through Popular Culture
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Using excerpts from the works of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, comics, and songs from different musical genres, students examine the characteristics of transcendentalism.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
08/23/2013
Remix
Introduction to Civil Disobedience | Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience"
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This is the first lesson in a week-long, mini-unit contains four individual lessons.  Through the course of all these lessons, students will be introduced to the concept of civil disobedience—people purposefully disobeying a law or protesting nonviolently about laws or social issues they feel to be unjust. They’ll read from, watch, and listen to three examples that address the issue: Henry David Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience," Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail," and the Teaching Tolerance documentary Viva La Causa written and directed by Bill Brummel.Activity Description: This lesson focuses on introducing, defining, and providing a basic example of historical civil disobedience using Henry David Thoreau's experience and an excerpt from his essay "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience."This lesson is designed to be used in a blended environment.  Accommodations are listed for non-blended courses.Time needed for activity: ~45 minute class periodResources needed: Online discussion board(s) set up at either pinup.com or answergarden.ch; copies of the "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience" excerpt (printed or electronic)

Subject:
Literature
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Wendy Arch
Date Added:
10/23/2018
Media Construction of Peace
Rating

This kit provides teachers, college faculty and other educators with the materials needed to engage students in a dynamic and constructivist process of learning how antiwar movements have been perceived by the people in the United States and how the U.S. media has constructed that public perception. The subject areas covered include U.S. history, African-American studies, labor studies, Latino studies, media studies, Native American studies, peace studies, sociology and womenŒ_ΏŁ_ studies among many others.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Author:
Sox Sperry
Date Added:
03/19/2013
Resource Depletion
Rating

This kit covers a historical overview of American representations of natural resources from ancient Indian basketry to contemporary web sites. It compares conflicting media constructions about the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the damning of rivers, and Chukchi sea oil drilling. By showing the slow realization that natural resources are finite, students will learn valuable lessons in earth, natural and environmental sciences.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Author:
Sox Sperry
Date Added:
04/30/2013
The Triumph of Nationalism/The House Dividing, America 1815 - 1850: Primary Sources
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The National Humanities center presents reading guides with primary source materials for the study of America in 1815-1850: The Triumph of Nationalism/The House Dividing. Primary source materials include letters, diaries, journals, poems, paintings, maps, essays, stories, treatises, sermons, addresses, and more. Resources are divided into the topics: Culture of the Common Man, Cult of Domesticity, Religion, Expansion, and America in 1850.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
America In Class
Date Added:
01/07/2013