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  • Heat Transfer
Ablative Shield Egg Data Sheet
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You will present students with a challenge: build a structure from different materials that will protect a model of the Ares launch vehicles (a raw egg) from the heat of a propane torch for as long as possible. Then they design, build, test, and revise their own thermal protection systems. They document their designs with sketches and written descriptions. As a culmination, students compile their results into a poster and present them to the class.

This activity explores the concepts of energy transfer with the following standards:
• Energy is a property of many substances and is associated with heat and light.
• Heat moves in predictable ways, flowing from warmer objects to cooler ones, until both reach the same temperature.

Subject:
Engineering
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
heather mahon (berk)
Date Added:
09/27/2018
The Basics of Transport Phenomena
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Have you ever wondered why ventilation helps to cool down your hot chocolate? Do you know why a surfing suit keeps you warm? Why iron feels cold, while wood feels warm at room temperature? Or how air is transferred into aqueous liquids in a water treatment plant? How can we sterilize milk with the least amount of energy? Or how do we design a new cooling tower of a power plant?

Transport Phenomena addresses questions like these and many more, exploring a wide variety of applications ranging from industrial processes to daily life problems and even to bioprocesses in our own body.

In Transport Phenomena, the transport and transfer of momentum, heat and mass are studied. To understand these processes which often take place simultaneously, the underlying concepts will be covered in this course.

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Delft University of Technology
Provider Set:
Delft University OpenCourseWare
Author:
Peter Hamersma
Rob Mudde
Date Added:
07/18/2018
Build a Thermos
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Getting Started:

This lesson is designed to be used within the heat transfer unit as an engineering design project.

My goal is to teach students:

The difference in heat conductivity of different materials.
Engage students in thinking about the principles of engineering (designing to meet criteria determined by the desired result).

Total class time:

170 minutes (2 class blocks, 1 period for demo, in-class design, 1 period for student-requested informational experiments).

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
heather mahon (berk)
Date Added:
12/06/2018
Build and Test a Model Solar House
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Construct and measure the energy efficiency and solar heat gain of a cardboard model house. Use a light bulb heater to imitate a real furnace and a temperature sensor to monitor and regulate the internal temperature of the house. Use a bright bulb in a gooseneck lamp to model sunlight at different times of the year, and test the effectiveness of windows for passive solar heating.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture Notes
Student Guide
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
05/16/2012
Burn a Peanut
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In this activity, learners burn a peanut, which produces a flame that can be used to boil away water and count the calories contained in the peanut. Learners use a formula to calculate the calories in a peanut and then differentiate between food calories and physicist calories as well as calories and joules.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Author:
Don Rathjen
Paul Doherty
The Exploratorium
Date Added:
10/31/2000
Concord Consortium: Solar Oven
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Elementary grade students investigate heat transfer in this activity to design and build a solar oven, then test its effectiveness using a temperature sensor. It blends the hands-on activity with digital graphing tools that allow kids to easily plot and share their data. Included in the package are illustrated procedures and extension activities. Note Requirements: This lesson requires a "VernierGo" temperature sensing device, available for ~ $40. This item is part of the Concord Consortium, a nonprofit research and development organization dedicated to transforming education through technology. The Consortium develops digital learning innovations for science, mathematics, and engineering.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Mathematics
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
04/02/2013
Cooking with the Sun - Creating a Solar Oven
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Educational Use
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Student groups are given a set of materials: cardboard, insulating materials, aluminum foil and Plexiglas, and challenged to build solar ovens. The ovens must collect and store as much of the sun's energy as possible. Students experiment with heat transfer through conduction by how well the oven is insulated and radiation by how well it absorbs solar radiation. They test the effectiveness of their designs qualitatively by baking something and quantitatively by taking periodic temperature measurements and plotting temperature vs. time graphs. To conclude, students think like engineers and analyze the solar oven's strengths and weaknesses compared to conventional ovens.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Lauren Powell
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Counting Calories
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Educational Use
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The students discover the basics of heat transfer in this activity by constructing a constant pressure calorimeter to determine the heat of solution of potassium chloride in water. They first predict the amount of heat consumed by the reaction using analytical techniques. Then they calculate the specific heat of water using tabulated data, and use this information to predict the temperature change. Next, the students will design and build a calorimeter and then determine its specific heat. After determining the predicted heat lost to the device, students will test the heat of solution. The heat given off by the reaction can be calculated from the change in temperature of the water using an equation of heat transfer. They will compare this with the value they predicted with their calculations, and then finish by discussing the error and its sources, and identifying how to improve their design to minimize these errors.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
James Prager
Janet Yowell
Malinda Zarske
Megan Schroeder
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Ecology at Work
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Educational Use
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Students learn how rooftop gardens help the environment and the lives of people, especially in urban areas. They gain an understanding of how plants reduce the urban heat island effect, improve air quality, provide agriculture space, reduce energy consumption and increase the aesthetic quality of cities. This draws upon the science of heat transfer (conduction, convection, radiation, materials, color) and ecology (plants, shade, carbon dioxide, photosynthesis), and the engineering requirements for rooftop gardens. In the associated activity, students apply their scientific knowledge to model and measure the effects of green roofs.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Engineering
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Carleigh Samson
Denise W. Carlson
Stephanie Rivale
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Energy Forms and Changes
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This simulation lets learners explore how heating and cooling adds or removes energy. Use a slider to heat blocks of iron or brick to see the energy flow. Next, build your own system to convert mechanical, light, or chemical energy into electrical or thermal energy. (Learners can choose sunlight, steam, flowing water, or mechanical energy to power their systems.) The simulation allows students to visualize energy transformation and describe how energy flows in various systems. Through examples from everyday life, it also bolsters understanding of conservation of energy. This item is part of a larger collection of simulations developed by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET).

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Ariel Paul
Emily Moore
John Blanco
Kathy Perkins
Noah Podolefsky
Trish Loeblein
Date Added:
04/25/2013
Evaporative Cooler
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Explore the concept of evaporative cooling through a hands-on experiment. Use a wet cloth and fan to model an air-conditioner and use temperature and relative humidity sensors to collect data. Then digitally plot the data using graphs in the activity. In an optional extension, make your own modifications to improve the cooler's efficiency.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Mathematics
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
12/12/2011
Feeling Hot, Hot, Hot
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CC BY-NC
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This project will be focused on designing, constructing and evaluating different containers to determine the optimal design for heat retention. After students have constructed their designs and collected and shared data, students will evaluate the class data to create an optimal design for our culminating event: warming ooey, gooey chocolate chip cookies to perfection! Through this activity, students will learn about energy transfer, engineering design process, data collection, graphing, rate of change, optimization, surface area and proportions. The students will test the effectiveness of their design using Vernier Probes to gather quantitative data and graphing the rate of temperature change. They will then create a poster presentation to share their data to the class. Students will use their mathematical skills to quantitatively analyze the strength and weaknesses of their designs while enjoying some delicious, toasty, warm cookies.

Subject:
Mathematics
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Lane County STEM Hub
Provider Set:
Content in Context SuperLessons
Date Added:
06/20/2016
Fluid Flow, Heat & Mass Transfer
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The course "Fluid Flow, Heat and Mass Transfer," course number ta3220, is third-year BSc course in the program of Applied Earth Sciences at Delft University of Technology. Students in this class have already taken a course in "Transport Phenomena" in the second year, and "Fluid Flow Heat and Mass Transfer" is designed as a follow-up to that class, with an emphasis on topics of importance in applied earth sciences, and in particular to Petroleum Engineering, groundwater flow and mining.
In practice, however I start over again with first principles with this class, because the initial concepts of the shell balance are difficult for students to grasp and can always use a second time through. The course covers simple fluid mechanics problems (rectilinear flow) using shell balances, for Newtonian and power-law fluids and Bingham plastics. Turbulence for Newtonian fluids is covered in the context of friction factors for flow in pipes, flow around spheres and flow in packed beds.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Reading
Provider:
Delft University of Technology
Provider Set:
Delft University OpenCourseWare
Author:
Prof. W.R. Rossen
Date Added:
02/19/2016
Greenhouse Effect in a Greenhouse
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Build your own miniature "greenhouse" out of a plastic container and plastic wrap, and fill it with different things such as dirt and sand to observe the effect this has on temperature. Monitor the temperature using temperature probes and digitally plot the data on the graphs provided in the activity.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
12/13/2011
Greenhouse Gases
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Explore how the Earth's atmosphere affects the energy balance between incoming and outgoing radiation. Using an interactive model, adjust realistic parameters such as how many clouds are present or how much carbon dioxide is in the air, and watch how these factors affect the global temperature.

Subject:
Education
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
12/13/2011
Greenhouse Light and Temperature
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Make your own miniature greenhouse and measure the light levels at different "times of day"--modeled by changing the angle of a lamp on the greenhouse--using a light sensor. Next, investigate the temperature in your greenhouse with and without a cover. Learn how a greenhouse works and how you can regulate the temperature in your model greenhouse.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
12/13/2011
Heat It Up!
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Educational Use
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Through a teacher demonstration using water, heat and food coloring, students see how convection moves the energy of the Sun from its core outwards. Students learn about the three different modes of heat transfer (convection, conduction, radiation) and how they are related to the Sun and life on our planet.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Geoffrey Hill
Jessica Butterfield
Jessica Todd
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Heat Transfer: From Hot to Not
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Students learn the fundamental concepts of heat transfer and heat of reaction. This includes concepts such as physical chemistry, an equation for heat transfer, and a basic understanding of energy and heat transfer.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
James Prager
Janet Yowell
Malinda Zarske
Megan Schroeder
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Heat Transfer Lesson
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Educational Use
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Students explore heat transfer and energy efficiency using the context of energy efficient houses. They gain a solid understanding of the three types of heat transfer: radiation, convection and conduction, which are explained in detail and related to the real world. They learn about the many ways solar energy is used as a renewable energy source to reduce the emission of greenhouse gasses and operating costs. Students also explore ways in which a device can capitalize on the methods of heat transfer to produce a beneficial result. They are given the tools to calculate the heat transferred between a system and its surroundings.

Subject:
Engineering
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Landon B. Gennetten
Lauren Cooper
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/18/2014