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  • Harper Lee
Elements of To Kill a Mockingbird Presentation
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This resource is a Google Slides presentation designed to educate students about five various elements of literature that play an important role in Harper Lee's novel, To Kill a Mockingbird.

Subject:
Literature
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Rachel Amedee
Date Added:
05/16/2019
Let’s Talk About Lula: Using Chapter 12 of 'To Kill a Mockingbird' to Explore Multiple Perspectives
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Educational Use
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Although most students would agree that To Kill a Mockingbird explores the brutal injustice of the Jim Crow South in a small town, they do not always realize that the novel has little explicit acknowledgement of the African-American response. While the injustice is clearly perpetrated against African Americans, readers observe the suffering only through the eyes of the white characters. Chapter 12 provides a brief moment where students can see the reaction of one African-American character, Lula. Spending time looking at and understanding Lula’s anger toward Scout and Jem is critical to teaching this novel.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Teaching Tolerance
Date Added:
11/28/2016
Quiz RL.5: Parts of Plot
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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A short quiz on CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5, featuring quotes from Margaret Atwood's book, The Robber Bride; Harper Lee's book, To Kill a Mockingbird; Leo Tolstoi's short story, "The Confessed Crime"; Anne Sexton's poem, "The Starry Night"; and, the TV Show, "Ben 10: Alien Force". Collected together, the quotes have a Dale-Chall text difficulty index of 4, and a Flesch-Kincaid level of 4.4.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Author:
Terrence Reilly Jr.
Date Added:
01/28/2016
"To Kill a Mockingbird": An Introduction to 1930s America
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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This activity teaches students about the setting of Harper Lee’s famous novel “To Kill a Mockingbird,” which takes place during 3 years (1933–1935) of the Great Depression. Part 1 of this activity can be used before students start reading the novel to help them understand what life was like in the 1930s. In this part, students will examine and answer questions about census documents that feature unemployment numbers and related information. Part 2 can be completed after students have read the first few chapters of the novel. In this part, students will write a piece using the RAFT technique (role, audience, format, topic) to show what they learned about the 1930s and what they have read so far.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
10/18/2019
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Literature
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Susan Ketcham
Date Added:
01/20/2016