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Algebra Team: Teacher Collaboration
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Algebra teachers, Juliana Jones and Marlo Warburton, have common philosophies and expectations in their algebra classrooms but use their own unique teaching styles and structures to create consistent experiences for students. Collaboration is an important part of that process and allows teachers to provide common learning experiences in their classrooms despite different teaching styles and structures. This video takes a look at the warm-up, lesson, strategies for group work, classroom expectations and routines to discuss commonalities but also identify ways in which each teacher personalizes their classrooms based on their own teaching style and personality.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Author:
Marlo Warburton, Juliana Jones,
Date Added:
11/02/2012
American Politics Group Data Projects
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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SETUPS (Empirical Teaching Unites in Political Science) data, published by the American Political Science Association, will be employed in group data analysis projects in an American Government class. Students then use results from these reports in composing an essay question on the course's final exam.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Steven Schier
Date Added:
11/06/2014
Analyzing Data on American Political Divisions
Conditions of Use:
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Students conducted data analysis about American political divisions and created two papers from this data analysis. Sutdents were assigned to group projects involving data analysis assigned chapters in MICROCASE AMERICAN GOVERNMENT, a textbook that includes access to a variety of datasets.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Steven Schier
Date Added:
11/06/2014
Applying Lessons Learned to the Volcanic Risk at Mt. Rainier
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In this jigsaw-method activity on subduction zone volcanism, students apply lessons learned from four historic eruptions to the volcanic hazards associated with Mt. Rainier in the Pacific Northwest.

Subject:
Geology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Starting Point (SERC)
Author:
Laurel Goodell
Date Added:
08/28/2012
Authenticity/Agency Rubrics
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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The Authenticity and Agency rubrics are based on elements from two frameworks: Student as Producer and Social Pedagogies. The rubrics were created for instructors and instructional designers to use as they develop authentic learning experiences in the course design process.

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Education
English Language Arts
History
Law
Life Science
Mathematics
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Jennifer Englund
Annette McNamara
Date Added:
09/18/2018
The Candle Icebreaker
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Small groups of students examine a candle to consider its chemical properties. Class discussion follows to consider macro vs. molecular events, energy, phase changes, etc.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Project Kaleidoscope
Author:
Dave Blackburn
Date Added:
08/28/2012
Carbon Cycling: Create Your Own Biology Lab
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During the pre-lab, students are asked to read a brief article about photosynthesis and complete a KWL chart to identify their own knowledge and understanding coming into the experiment. Based on what they wish to learn, they create a problem statement that will become the basis for their experiments design.In collaborative groups, students write procedures, conduct their experiment, collect and record data and prepare for the final, reflective portion of the experience. During this phase, students determine the validity of their evidence and determine whether or not it supports their hypothesis. To improve future experiences, they also reflect upon how to make their data better and how to improve their use of the scientific process.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
Collaborative Culture: Group Work
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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We've all been in a classroom (maybe our own) where the teacher assigns a group project with no more guidance than passing out the materials needed. In the self-managed classroom, intentional group work is key. Collaborating with peers around meaningful academic work supports students' healthy development, academically and socially, in ways that a teacher alone cannot.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
EL Education
Date Added:
07/27/2018
Cyberbullying: What's Crossing the Line?
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Middles school Social Studies teacher using contemporary issues to incorporate ELA CCSS into a lesson about cyberbullying. Students use factual information, a video and two case studies to consider and analyze different perspectives in specific cyberbullying incidents.Small group discussions allow students to both inform and support their opinions as they formulate ideas about the impact of the bullying and decisions resulting from particular incidents. Students grapple with different possibilities and consider the different perspectives of those involved in and affected by the bullying. Beginning first with students' ideas about bullying, Amy tries to find consensus in understanding when a line 'has been crossed' and actions become bullying. The class then watches a video to understand the impact that bullying has on one individual and discusses possible actions and outcomes for this situation. As students begin to grapple with different perspectives and ideas, they are asked to examine two case studies and answer questions that reflect multiple viewpoints about these two situations. Students reflect on the emotion involved when discussing bullying and recognize both the complexity and potential severity of the issue.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
English Language Arts, Grade 11
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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The 11th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 11th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Students move from learning the class rituals and routines and genre features of argument writing in Unit 11.1 to learning about narrative and informational genres in Unit 11.2: The American Short Story. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers
Conditions of Use:
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In this unit, students will take a look at the historical vision of the American Dream as put together by our Founding Fathers. They will be asked: How, if at all, has this dream changed? Is this dream your dream? First students will participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing for his or her vision of the American Dream, and then they will write an argument laying out and defending their personal view of what the American Dream should be.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate closely one of the documents that they feel expresses the American Dream.
Students participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing his or her vision of the American Dream.
Students write a paper, taking into consideration the different points of view in the documents read, answering the question “What is the American Dream now?”
Students write their own argument describing and defending their vision of what the American Dream should be.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What has been the historical vision of the American Dream?
What should the American Dream be? (What should we as individuals and as a nation aspire to?)
How would women, former slaves, and other disenfranchised groups living during the time these documents were written respond to them?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers, Evaluating and Responding, Peer Response Groups
Conditions of Use:
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In this lesson, students will meet with their writing group to edit their papers. They'll learn the protocols and routines for responding to classmates' writing, and they will make a plan for revising their paper.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
03/16/2018
Evaluating School Classroom Discussion
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It is important to learn from classroom discussions, both for pupils and teachers. This unit will help you, as a teacher, to evaluate such discussions in order to help students develop their understanding and use of spoken language. The ability to use language as a tool for constructing and sharing knowledge is applicable across the whole curriculum.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
09/06/2007
Exploring the World of Ancient Civilizations
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High School Global History teacher Sarah Caufield, from the New York Harbor School, turns the learning of ancient civilizations over to her students as they conduct brief research to share with their peers. Students work in self-selected groups and determine the key information to include on the poster they create about a given ancient civilization. Topics include the function and purpose of the civilization, early writing systems, calendar systems, religion, and goods and trade. Students then participate in a gallery walk where they use a rubric to grade and provide feedback on their classmatesŐ work.Students work very naturally and effectively within teams and across teams and provide feedback openly.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
Farming in the Gilded Age: A Simulation
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History teacher, Andrew King, begins by explaining how his class will participate in a simulation activity to learn about farming in the Gilded Age. He assigns the students to four families and explains that each family will get $2000. They need to set aside $200 for transportation and $300 for living expenses. Before setting a goal for the amount of money they hope to make, each family will decide which crops and livestock they think are best and record their decisions. Andrew circulates around the classroom and consults with the groups. Once the groups have come to consensus about which crops to plant, Andrew reads the results of farming in the year 1885. Each family calculates whether they lost or made money based on these results. The class now repeats this process for 1886. As each family makes decisions about how to farm in 1886, Andrew discusses the concept of overspeculation. Andrew then reads the results for 1886. The students realize that their farms are failing. Andrew talks about how bankers don't want to lend money to failing farms and at the end of the simulation, Andrew tells the class that the bank wants its $2000 loan back from each family. If the families don't have the money, the bank will take over the farm and put the families in jail. The class discusses the risk and uncertainty of farming in the Gilded Age.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Agriculture
U.S. History
Economics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
Freedom Within Form: How Much is Too Much?
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Instructional expert Jim Knight visits John Cusick to observe a small groups project and discuss the classroom management techniques he is using. John and Jim discuss structured lessons, giving students respect, and finding the key to unlocking their love of learning.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Author:
Jim Knight, John Cusick
Date Added:
11/02/2012