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  • Friction
4 - Engineer a Shoe
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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This unit is centered on designing a shoe for a customer. Students decide on a particular type of shoe that they want to design and utilize ideas of force, impulse, and friction to meet the needs of a particular customer. Force plates are used study the relationship between force, time, and impulse to allow students to get the mathematical models that allow them to make data informed decisions about their shoe design.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Portland Metro STEM Partnership
Provider Set:
Patterns Physics
Date Added:
08/01/2018
Adaptive Map Open Statics Textbook
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Open textbook in statics for engineering undergraduates. Covers particles and rigid bodies (extended bodies), structures (trusses), and simple machines. Includes text, videos, images, and worked examples (written and video).

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Adaptive Map Digital Textbook Project
Author:
Jacob Moore
Date Added:
03/11/2019
Balanced and Unbalanced Forces | Forces and Motion | Physics
Rating

How do we find out whether the forces acting on an object are balanced or unbalanced? Learn in this video from the "Forces and Motion" chapter of the Virtual School GCSE / K12 Physics.

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This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License:
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs
CC BY-NC-ND

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Case Study
Lecture
Provider:
The Virtual School
Date Added:
02/14/2013
Building Roller Coasters
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Students build their own small-scale model roller coasters using pipe insulation and marbles, and then analyze them using physics principles learned in the associated lesson. They examine conversions between kinetic and potential energy and frictional effects to design roller coasters that are completely driven by gravity. A class competition using different marbles types to represent different passenger loads determines the most innovative and successful roller coasters.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Scott Liddle
Date Added:
10/14/2015
College Physics II
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This course is designed for the student in science, electronic technology, or a health profession such as physical therapy. Subject matter covered will include: principles of mechanics, concurrent forces, nonconcurrent forces, friction, elasticity, motion, forces and motion, work and energy, power, impulse and momentum, and simple harmonic motion. A non-calculus approach.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Northern Essex Community College
Author:
Il Yoon
Date Added:
05/15/2019
Discovering Friction
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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With a simple demonstration activity, students are introduced to the concept of friction as a force that impedes motion when two surfaces are in contact. Then, in the Associated Activity (Sliding and Stuttering), they work in teams to use a spring scale to drag an object such as a ceramic coffee cup along a table top or the floor. The spring scale allows them to measure the frictional force that exists between the moving cup and the surface it slides on. By modifying the bottom surface of the cup, students can find out what kinds of surfaces generate more or less friction. They also discover that both static and kinetic friction are involved when an object initially at rest is caused to slide across a surface.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mary R. Hebrank
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Does Contact Area Matter?
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Using the same method for measuring friction that was used in the previous lesson (Discovering Friction), students design and conduct experiments to determine if the amount of area over which an object contacts a surface it is moving across affects the amount of friction encountered.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mary R. Hebrank
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Does Weight Matter?
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Using the same method for measuring friction that was used in the previous lesson (Discovering Friction), students design and conduct an experiment to determine if weight added incrementally to an object affects the amount of friction encountered when it slides across a flat surface. After graphing the data from their experiments, students can calculate the coefficients of friction between the object and the surface it moved upon, for both static and kinetic friction.

Subject:
Engineering
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mary R. Hebrank
Date Added:
09/26/2008
Don't Crack Humpty
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Student groups are provided with a generic car base on which to design a device/enclosure to protect an egg on or in the car as it rolls down a ramp at increasing slopes. During this in-depth physics/science/technology activity, student teams design, build and test their creations to meet the design challenge, and are expected to perform basic mathematical calculations using collected data, including a summative cost to benefit ratio.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Justin Riley
Ryan St. Gelais
Scott Beaurivage
Date Added:
09/18/2014
The Egg-cellent Egg Launch
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this activity, students will learn about and apply the Laws of Physics to successfully launch and land a raw egg. The activity frames the problem around designing and building a bottle rocket that will protect a raw egg being launched into the air at least seven meters. Resources included in this lesson are found at the bottom of this document and include:

-Teacher guide
-Physics note sheets on motion, speed, velocity, acceleration, momentum, force, friction, Newton’s Laws of Motion, potential and kinetic energy and gravity.
-Egg Launch Instructions
-Link to Bottle Rocket Launching Instructions
-Links to videos
-Post Assessment

Subject:
Engineering
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Unit of Study
Author:
Jennifer Ennis
Date Added:
12/06/2018
Energy Skate Park
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Learn about conservation of energy with a skater dude! Build tracks, ramps and jumps for the skater and view the kinetic energy, potential energy and friction as he moves. You can also take the skater to different planets or even space!

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Danielle Harlow
Kathy Perkins
Michael
Michael Dubson
Sam Reid
Trish Loeblein
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
10/03/2006
Energy Skate Park (AR)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Learn about conservation of energy with a skater dude! Build tracks, ramps and jumps for the skater and view the kinetic energy, potential energy and friction as he moves. You can also take the skater to different planets or even space!

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Danielle Harlow
Kathy Perkins
Michael Dubson
Patricia Loblein
Sam Reid
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
07/02/2008
Energy Skate Park: Basics
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Students will: Predict the kinetic and potential energy of objects Design a skate park Examine how kinetic and potential energy interact with each other

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Ariel Paul
Emily B Moore
Katherine Perkins
Noah Podolefsky
Sam Reid
Trish Loeblein
Date Added:
01/31/2012
Energy of Motion
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

By taking a look at the energy of motion all around us, students learn about the types of energy and their characteristics. They first learn about the two simplest forms of mechanical energy: kinetic and potential energy, as illustrated by pendulums and roller coasters. They come to understand that energy can change from one form into another, and be described and determined by equations. Through the example of a waterwheel, the concepts of and differences between work and power are explained and calculated. Conservation of momentum and collisions are explored, with analogies to popular sports (billiards, baseball, golf), and how elastic and inelastic collisions are considered in the games' design. To show another energy transformation concept, the behavior of energy dissipating into heat by means of friction is presented. Students learn to recognize static friction, kinetic friction and drag, how they work, and how to calculate frictional force. A final lesson integrates the energy of motion concepts, showing how they are interconnected in everyday applications such as skateboards, scooters, roller coasters, trains, cars, planes, trucks and elevators. Through numerous hands-on activities, students swing pendulums, use plastic two-liter bottles to construct model waterwheels, bounce different types of balls, use weights to generate friction data, and roll balls down ramps to collide into cups.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Energy on a Roller Coaster
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This activity utilizes hands-on learning with the conservation of energy and the interaction of friction. Students use a roller coaster track and collect position data. The students then calculate velocity, and energy data. After the lab, students relate the conversion of potential and kinetic energy to the conversion of energy used in a hybrid car.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Joel Daniel
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Engineering a Restraint System: A MS Physical Science Lesson
Rating

Secondary educators across Lebanon County, Pennsylvania developed lesson plans to integrate the Pennsylvania Career Education and Work Standards with the content they teach. This work was made possible through a partnership between the South Central PA Workforce Investment Board (SCPa Works) and Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit 13 (IU13) and was funded by a Teacher in the Workplace Grant Award from the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry. This lesson plan was developed by one of the talented educators who participated in this project during the 2018-2019 school year.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Kelly Galbraith
Jesse Eisenbise
Date Added:
06/25/2019
Factors Affecting Friction
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Based on what they have already learned about friction, students formulate hypotheses concerning the effects of weight and contact area on the amount of friction between two surfaces. In the Associated Activities (Does Weight Matter? and Does Area Matter?), students design and conduct simple experiments to test their hypotheses, using procedures similar to those used in the previous lesson (Discovering Friction). An analysis of their data will reveal the importance of weight to normal friction (the friction that occurs as a result of surface roughness) and the importance of surface area to the friction that occurs between smooth surfaces due to molecular attraction. Based on their data, students will also be able to calculate coefficients of friction for the materials tested, and compare these to published values for various materials.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mary R. Hebrank
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Fascinating Friction!
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students use wood, wax paper and oil to investigate the importance of lubrication between materials and to understand the concept of friction. Using wax paper and oil placed between pieces of wood, the function of lubricants between materials is illustrated. Students extend their understanding of friction to bones and joints in the skeletal system and become aware of what engineers can do to help reduce friction in the human body as well as in machines.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Abigail Watrous
Beth Myers
Denali Lander
Janet Yowell
Jessica Todd
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Sara Born
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Fluid Pressure and Flow
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Explore pressure in the atmosphere and underwater. Reshape a pipe to see how it changes fluid flow speed. Experiment with a leaky water tower to see how the height and water level determine the water trajectory.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Ariel Paul
Kathy Perkins
Noah Podolefsky
Sam Reid
Trish Loeblein
Date Added:
05/29/2012
The Force of Friction
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In the first of two lessons of this curricular unit, students are introduced to the concept of friction as a force that impedes motion when two surfaces are in contact. Student teams use spring scales to drag objects, such as a ceramic coffee cup, along a table top or the floor, measuring the frictional force that exists between the moving object and the surface it slides on. By modifying the bottom surface of the object, students find out what kinds of surfaces generate more or less friction. They also discover that both static and kinetic friction are involved when an object initially at rest is caused to slide across a surface. In the second lesson of the unit, students design and conduct experiments to determine the effects of weight and surface area on friction. They discover that weight affects normal friction (the friction that results from surface roughness), but for very smooth surfaces, the friction due to molecular attraction is affected by contact area.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mary R. Hebrank
Date Added:
10/14/2015