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Capturing Homemade Microgravity
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This activity (page 2 of the PDF) is a full inquiry investigation ...

This activity (page 2 of the PDF) is a full inquiry investigation into how ordinary things behave in microgravity, similar to what astronauts experience. Groups of learners will prepare a large drop box, complete with wireless camera, to drop off a balcony with an everyday phenomenon (e.g. burning candle, fizzing seltzer tablet, swinging pendulum) inside. After observing the object in ordinary gravity, it is placed inside the drop box and dropped so the camera can record images during free fall for analysis. Relates to linked video, DragonflyTV: Microgravity.

Subject:
Engineering
Technology
Education
Mathematics
Chemistry
Geoscience
Physics
Space Science
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Provider:
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
National Science Foundation
Twin Cities Public Television
Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.
Free Fall
Conditions of Use:
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In this quick activity (page 1 of PDF), learners will use a ...

In this quick activity (page 1 of PDF), learners will use a simple physics of motion and gravity demonstration to test their predicting skills. Learners predict which quarter will hit the floor first during this free fall experiment. This activity not only requires learners to observe carefully, but also listen carefully! Relates to the linked video, DragonflyTV: Hockey.

Subject:
Education
Chemistry
Physics
Space Science
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Simulations
Provider:
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
National Science Foundation
Twin Cities Public Television
Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.
Free-Fall Bottles & Tubes
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In this physics activity, learners conduct two experiments to explore free-falling. In ...

In this physics activity, learners conduct two experiments to explore free-falling. In the first experiment, water-filled plastic bottles with holes in them spurt water under normal conditions, but don't leak while in free-fall. In the second experiment, a ping-pong ball in a water-filled plastic tube floats upward under normal conditions, but remains motionless when the tube is dropped or thrown. Educators can use pre-assembled materials for group demonstration purposes. Note: this activity will get the floor wet, so consider doing this outside.

Subject:
Engineering
Technology
Education
Mathematics
Chemistry
Geoscience
Physics
Space Science
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Simulations
Provider:
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
Don Rathjen
The Exploratorium
Making Moon Craters
Conditions of Use:
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As a weighted plastic egg is dropped into a tub of flour, ...

As a weighted plastic egg is dropped into a tub of flour, students see the effect that different heights and masses of the same object have on the overall energy of that object while observing a classic example of potential (stored) energy transferred to kinetic energy (motion). The plastic egg's mass is altered by adding pennies inside it. Because the egg's shape remains constant, and only the mass and height are varied, students can directly visualize how these factors influence the amounts of energy that the eggs carry for each experiment, verified by measurement of the resulting impact craters. Students learn the equations for kinetic and potential energy and then make predictions about the depths of the resulting craters for drops of different masses and heights. They collect and graph their data, comparing it to their predictions, and verifying the relationships described by the equations. This classroom demonstration is also suitable as a small group activity.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Eric Anderson, Jeff Kessler, Irene Zhao
RESOURCE GK-12 Program,
Springs and Stomachs
Conditions of Use:
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In this demonstration, learners investigate mass, gravity, and acceleration by dropping a ...

In this demonstration, learners investigate mass, gravity, and acceleration by dropping a wooden bar with a balloon attached to its underside, a mass suspended from it by rubber bands, and a sharp-pointed screw pointing upward from the top of the mass. This activity also helps learners understand why stomach muscles feel uncomfortable and tense during a free fall or on a roller coaster. Learners can also explore this concept by dropping a slinky.

Subject:
Engineering
Technology
Education
History, Law, Politics
Life Science
Mathematics
Chemistry
Geoscience
Physics
Space Science
Psychology
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Simulations
Provider:
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
Don Rathjen
The Exploratorium