Search Results (174)

View
Selected filters:
  • English
2010 English Wiki
Rating

Access three e-lessons that go in line with curriculum for prepatory school (middle school) English standards

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Game
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Individual Authors
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Ozhan Mustapha Hammami
Activities for children
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Ever tried to play games with kids in English?It can be a fun treat!But what about when the child doesn’t even know how to say hello?In this case, trying to play games or sing songs can be just plain frustrating.It can’t be denied—teaching English to children is nothing like teaching adults! 5 Creative Ways to Teach Children  Through Fun Activities1. Art ProjectsArt is a fantastic way to get your young students excited and interested in a variety of lessons to reinforce different vocabulary.The art project that goes with this lesson should either come at the end of the class or at the beginning of the following class after a brief review of the vocabulary. Students can draw pictures independently, but you should walk around the room and encourage them to talk to you about their work.2. Active GamesYou’ve probably already witnessed the awesome power of kinesthetic learning in the classroom, and active games can be a great way to get beginners up and moving. One of the best for beginners is Simon Says, or a variant thereof.Simon Says can be a very useful way to reinforce new vocabulary while also upping the energy. That’s why it’s a great choice either at the beginning or in the middle of a class.3. Singing SongsSongs are a fantastic mnemonic device for new vocabulary, and the Internet is a wealth of different song ideas. The best time to use a song is once the vocabulary has already been introduced. Some songs are simpler, ideal for using the same day or the same week that the vocabulary is introduced.4. LabelingLabeling can be a great way to remember new vocabulary. We already discussed a bit how labeling can be used during an art project, but you can also use labeling in a classroom or with photographs.If you’re trying to teach the names of different things in the classroom, tasking your students with creating labels for them can be a great way to get them up and moving—and speaking! Once the labels are created, be sure to laminate them. You can use them with all sorts of games, from treasure hunts to interactive matching or memory games.5. Educative PlayParticularly when your students are very young, educative play is a useful technique for teaching them without ever letting on! Students can be encouraged to play with one another in a variety of ways, either with board games or in a playroom or space, depending on the way your school is laid out. The idea with educative play is for teachers and assistants to participate in the play in English, asking questions that students can answer.

Subject:
Language Education (ESL)
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
paola ramirez
Adult ELL Phonics
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This phonics program was developed to serve students with diverse educational backgrounds, with a specific focus on refugees. One of the challenges in working with refugees is that, unlike international students, they come to English classes with huge variation in educational experience. Some students may have finished high school or have a college degree, while others may not have ever picked up a pencil before. The goal of this program is to provide a bridge for those students with limited literacy skills so that they are able to move on to a more traditional beginning ESL class. There are a number of assumptions about academic skills made in most English language classrooms, even at a beginning level. As a result, teachers and students alike become frustrated when those expectations are confounded.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Ryan Yates
Alternative Microeconomics/Basic Microeconomics
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

From a technical perspective, economics is the study of how various alternatives or choices are evaluated to best achieve a given objective. The domain of economics is the study of processes by which scarce resources are allocated to satisfy unlimited wants. Ideally, the resources are allocated to their highest valued uses. Supply, demand, preferences, costs, benefits, production relationships and exchange are tools that are used to describe and analyze the market processes by which individuals allocate scarce resources to satisfy as many wants as possible. This increasingly narrow focus is the domain of modern, “neoclassical,” microeconomic analysis. This approach is typical of most economists and is referred to as orthodox economics.

The five basic questions that are asked in the study of the allocation problem are: 1) What to produce? 2) How many to produce? 3) How to produce? 4) When to produce? 5) Who gets it? Provisioning should seek to understand the nature of wants or objectives. Provisioning is the process of framing the approaches to the allocation problem.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Boise State University
Approaches to Writing
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

A document that compares and contrasts the traditional method of teaching writing with the writing process approach advocated in the revised curriculum in English.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Elementary Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Professional Development Service for Teachers (PDST)
Provider Set:
Scoilnet
Author:
Eithne Kennedy
Are You Being Formal Enough?
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this seminar, you will learn how writers use a formal style of writing when reporting about research. You will also learn about the difference between subjective and objective reporting and how writers must be precise in the research process. The bottom line is writers must know the correct words, the placement of those words, and the appropriate “level” of those words when writing in a research setting.StandardsCC.1.4.9-10.KWrite with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of composition. • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms of the discipline in which they are writing.CC.1.4.9-10.XWrite routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes and audiences.CC.1.4.9-10.RDemonstrate a grade-appropriate command of the conventions of standard English grammar, usage, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Argument Structure and Syntax, Spring 2003
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Detailed investigation of the major issues and problems in the study of lexical argument structure and how it determines syntactic structure. Empirical scope is along three dimensions: typology, lexical class, and theoretical framework. The range of linguistic types include English, Japaneses, Navajo, and Warlpiri. Lexical classes include those of Levin's English Verb Classes and others producing emerging work on diverse languages. The theoretical emphasis is on structural relations among elements of argument structure.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Linguistics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Marantz, Alec
The Art of Language
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

The words we choose to communicate with can be quite tricky. In fact, great writers are considered artists because of their language skills. In this seminar, you will learn how to enhance an argument by choosing your words carefully and “playing” with the language. Rhetorical devices (a fancy term for “persuasive words”) will be a significant aspect of your artful language.StandardsCC.1.2.9-10.H: Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing the validity of reasoning and relevance of evidence.CC.1.4.9-10.C: Develop and analyze the topic with relevant, well-chosen, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic; include graphics and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.CC.1.4.9-10.G: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
BC Reads: Adult Literacy Fundamental English - Course Pack 1
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Description: This course pack is designed to meet the learning outcomes for Adult Literacy Fundamental English Level 1 (roughly equivalent to beginner to grade 1.5 in the K-12 system). Every of the nine chapters includes a level-appropriate, high-interest reading of approximately 100 words. The readings are freely available in a separate reader with convenient links to the readings in each chapter of this course pack. The online version of this course pack also contains audio recordings of each story in the reader. These recordings, combined with vocabulary and word pattern exercises, prepare the Level 1 student to read each paragraph-long text with greater independence. Font size and line spacing can be adjusted in the online view, and have been enhanced for the print and PDF versions for easier reading. This course pack has been reviewed by subject experts from colleges and universities.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Author:
Shantel Ivits
BC Reads: Adult Literacy Fundamental English - Course Pack 2
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This course pack is designed to meet the learning outcomes for Adult Literacy Fundamental English Level 2 (roughly equivalent to grades 1.5 to 3 in the K-12 system). Every of the eight chapters includes a level-appropriate, high-interest reading of approximately 200 words. The readings are freely available in a separate reader with convenient links to the readings in each chapter of this course pack. The online version of this course pack also contains audio recordings of each story in the reader. These recordings, combined with vocabulary and word pattern exercises, prepare the Level 2 student to read each chapter with greater independence. Font size and line spacing can be adjusted in the online view, and have been enhanced for the print and PDF versions for easier reading. This course pack has been reviewed by subject experts from colleges and universities.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Author:
Shantel Ivits
BC Reads: Adult Literacy Fundamental English - Reader 1
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This reader contains nine original stories about healing, discovery, survival, relationships, justice, and connections to the land explored through the lens of the plant world. These stories, written specifically for adults, are designed to accompany the BC Reads: Adult Literacy Fundamental English - Course Pack 1. This level 1 reader, one of a series of six readers, is roughly equivalent to beginner to grade 1.5 in the K-12 system. Font size and line spacing can be adjusted in the online view, and have been enhanced for the print and PDF versions for easier reading. This reader has been reviewed by subject experts from colleges and universities.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Author:
Shantel Ivits
Bay College - ENGL 101 - Rhetoric & Composition
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Online OER text adapted for use in ENGL 101 - Rhetoric & Composition by Amber Kinonen, Jennifer McCann, Todd McCann, and Erica Mead for Bay College.

© 2017 Bay College and Content Creators. Except where otherwise noted this work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Bay College
Author:
Amber Kinonen
Erica Mead
Jennifer McCann
Todd McCann
Bay College - ENGL 145 - Technical and Report Writing
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Online OER text adapted for use in ENGL 145 - ENGL 145 Technical and Report Writing by Amber Kinonen for Bay College.

© 2017 Bay College and Content Creators. Except where otherwise noted this work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Amber Kinonen
Be Clear, Not Cloudy
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

A researcher often reports his or her findings in the form of academic writing. To do so, the researcher must use a particular writing style, being as clear as possible. Unlike other types of writing where adjectives and descriptive phrases are encouraged, research writing emphasizes simple sentences striving always for clarity. In this seminar, you will learn about clear, concise writing and how to choose precise words to say only what needs to be said. StandardsCC.1.4.9-10.KWrite with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of composition. • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms of the discipline in which they are writing.CC.1.4.9-10.XWrite routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes and audiences.CC.1.4.9-10.RDemonstrate a grade-appropriate command of the conventions of standard English grammar, usage, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Beginners French
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Beginners French.
Numbers 1-10.
To translate french numbers into english.
The resource can be customised to use with any other language other than english.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Celia Bautista
Big Grammar Book
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

** This book has been donated to the public domain.**

From the introduction:

Hello there . . . ! Welcome to English Banana.com’s Big Grammar Book. It’s the third fantastic book from English Banana and the aim this time is to practise grammar, grammar and, er, more grammar!

It’s jam-packed from cover to cover with a great selection of photocopiable worksheets taken from the popular English Banana.com website. We wanted to provide teachers with a really useful book of no-nonsense grammar worksheets that they can dip into and use in class with students at Entry Level (ESOL Core Curriculum Entry Levels 1 & 2). It is also ideal for students to work with at home since the answers are all printed at the back.

The book is divided into four parts and is graded in difficulty, so that it begins with some basic stuff and builds up to more challenging grammar activities. It features a selection of Essential English worksheets which provide practice for crucial basic areas of knowledge for learners at Entry Level, like using numbers, writing the alphabet, spelling days and months correctly, and so on.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Language Education (ESL)
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
English Banana.com
Author:
Matt Purland