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American Citizens! We Appeal To You In All Calmness. Is It Not Time To Pause? . . . A Paper Entitled The American Patriot
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An advertisement announcing publication of the "American Citizen," a short-lived nativist newspaper. The broadside is illustrated with an elaborate and venomous anti-Catholic scene. At left a temple of Liberty stands on a mound labeled "Constitution and Laws." At the foot of the hill is a gathering of native Americans, including sailors, farmers, soldiers, and a Revolutionary War veteran. They hold banners emblazoned with such mottoes as "The Bible The Cornerstone of Liberty," "Beware of Foreign Influence," "None But Americans Shall Rule America," and "Education, Morality, and Religion." Other banners bear the names of sites of great revolutionary battles. In the background are a harbor with ships and the skyline of a city. In contrast, an unruly contingent of foreigners, mostly Irish, alight from a newly landed ship at right. The ship, "from Cork," bears the papal coat of arms. The foreigners carry banners reading, "We Are Bound to Carry Out the Pious Intentions of His Holiness the Pope," "Americans Shant Rule Us!!" and "Fradom of Spache and Action!" Among them are several clerics, a drunken mother with several children, and a few unkempt ruffians. One of the newcomers (lower right) beats a man with a club. In the distance, across the ocean, the basilica of St. Peter's in Rome is visible. From it issues a giant basilisk wearing the pope's crown, which is seized by a large hand from above. A commentary is provided in the lengthy continuation of the title: "Already the enemies of our dearest institutions, like the foreign spies in the Trojan horse of old, are within our gates. They are disgorging themselves upon us, at the rate of Hundreds of Thousands Every Year! They aim at nothing short of conquest and supremacy over us." Below the illustration the text states that the "American Patriot" favors "protection of American Mechanics Against Foreign Pauper Labor. Foreigners having a residence in the country of 21 years before voting, Our present Free School System, and Carrying out the laws of the State, as regards sending back Foreign Paupers and Criminals." The paper opposes "Papal Agression & Roman Catholicism, Foreigners holding office, Raising Foreign Military Companies in the United States, Nunneries and Jesuits, To being taxed for the support of Foreign paupers millions of dollars yearly To secret Foreign Orders in the U.S." |The Patriot is published by J.E. Farwell & Co., 32 Congress St., Boston, and for sale at the Periodical Depots in this place.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Purchase; Caroline and Erwin Swann Memorial Fund.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1852-3.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
At Work Again Back to the Farm
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Exhibit poster showing two scenes "At work again" and "Back to the farm" in which men using "working protheses" perform manual labor in a woodworking shop and on a farm. Poster caption: Physical handicaps are made up for so far as possible by modern artificial appliances - "Working prostheses" they are called - which replace the missing limb. Men in the mechanical trades are fitted with chucks in which can be fitted interchangeably the various tools of their calling. Exhibit of the Red Cross Institute for Crippled and Disabled Men and the Red Cross Institute for the Blind.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - World War I Posters
Business Law and Ethics
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Law, in its simplest form, is used to protect one party from another. For instance, laws protect customers from being exploited by companies. Laws protect companies from other companies. Laws even protect citizens and corporations from the government. However, law is neither perfect nor all encompassing. This course will introduce the student to the laws and ethical standards that managers must abide by in the course of conducting business. Laws and ethics almost always shape a company's decision-making process; a bank cannot charge any interest rate it wants to charge that rate must be appropriate. By the end of this course, the student will have a clear understanding of the legal and ethical environment in which businesses operate. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify sources of law in the United States; Describe the function and role of courts in the US legal system; Differentiate litigation from methods of alternative dispute resolution; List the elements of the major torts; List the essential elements of a valid contract; Describe how a contract can fail; Summarize the remedies available for breach of contract; Distinguish between real and personal property; Identify the various interests in real property and how they pass; Identify the requirements to hold various rights under intellectual property laws; Analyze the impact of the digital era on intellectual property rights; Distinguish between at-will employment and contractual employment; Identify laws that generally regulate the employer-employee relationship; Identify criminal acts related to the business world; Define white collar crime; Describe the various forms of business organization; Identify the major laws regulating business in the United States; Identify major ethical concerns in business today. (Business Administration 205)

Subject:
Business and Communication
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
The Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
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This site provides a summary, history, and teaching activities related to the EEOC and this historic law, which forbade discrimination on the basis of sex as well as race in hiring, promoting, and firing.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Development Economics: Microeconomic Issues and Policy Models, Fall 2008
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" Topics include productivity effects of health, private and social returns to education, education quality, education policy and market equilibrium, gender discrimination, public finance, decision making within families, firms and contracts, technology, labor and migration, land, and the markets for credit and savings."

Subject:
Business and Communication
Finance
Nutrition
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Banerjee, Abhijit
Duflo, Esther
Olken, Benjamin
EconGuy Videos: Does Automation Destroy Jobs?
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When machines or computers are used to automate a task, does that mean that human workers will lose their jobs? As with most questions in economics, it depends. See how computers and toilet paper illustrate two different effects of technology on jobs. Overall, EconGuy shows that even when workers in one industry lose out, the economy as a whole benefits from automation and technology.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Saint Michael's College
Provider Set:
EconGuy Videos
Author:
Patrick Walsh
Economic Systems
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This is a collection of downloadable video clips on the theme of Economic Systems, with guiding questions for students. Clips are drawn from the following PBS WIDE ANGLE documentaries: "To Have and Have Not" (2002), "A State of Mind" (2003), "Ladies First" (2004), "1-800-INDIA" (2005), "Border Jumpers" (2005).

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Thirteen/WNET New York
Provider Set:
WIDE ANGLE: Window into Global History
Employee Student Support Agreement - Fresno County
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This two page document was created by the Department of Social Services in Fresno County, California. Page 1 is an "agreement" document outlining expectations of a part-time student employee who is concurrently working and pursuing an advanced degree through the Title IV-E program. Page 2 is a "letter of intent", outlining the criteria upon which the Department will base its decision to issue a letter of support, required for admission into a University Title IV-E degree program.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Energy and Manufacturing: Cluster Workforce Analyses
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This resource contains two reports that analyze several of Michigan's labor market measures in the energy and manufacturing industries. These measures include employment concentration, trends, forecasts, key occupations, education program completers, and workforce demographics. These reports are designed to be an additional tool to assist in the implementation of the Michigan Industry Cluster Approach (MICA). MICA focuses on aligning efforts "“ initiatives, programs, and funding "“ around priority clusters for a demand-driven workforce system. A key activity of MICA is the convening of groups of employers to identify and develop solutions to address workforce needs. The findings within these reports are intended to provide a road map that leads to stronger partnerships and a more effective workforce development system.

Subject:
Engineering
Automotive Technology and Repair
Manufacturing
Material Type:
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Center for Automotive Technology - Macomb
Provider Set:
Center for Advanced Automotive Technology
Author:
State of Michigan
Engineers Blaze the Trail for Education! The Engineers Can Place Men From 18 to 40 Where they Can Learn their Trade in the Army.
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U.S. Army recruiting poster showing a group of men carrying the tools of the engineering trades, also shown is a list of educational opportunities available to new recruits.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - World War I Posters
Federal-Abolition-Whig Trap, To Catch Voters In
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An illustrated anti-Whig broadside, designed to combat the "Log Cabin campaign" tactics of presidential candidate William Henry Harrison. The text warns the people of New Orleans of Whig election propaganda: "People of Louisiana, above you have an accurate representation of the federal "Log-Cabin" Trap, invented by the "bank-parlor, Ruffle-shirt, silk-stocking" Gentry, for catching the "votes" of the industrious and laboring classes, of our citizens, of both town and country. . . . The "log cabin" is raised to blind you with the belief, that they are your friends . . ." The author then goes on to describe Whig campaign techniques as relying on deception, alcohol, and visual enticements, and as an "appeal to [the people's] passions, with mockeries, humbugs, shows, and parades. . . ." In the illustration a man sucks at a barrel of "Hard Cider" linked by a trip-rod to a precariously tilted log cabin. Above is the "Federal Bank Whig Motto. We Stoop to Conquer."|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-24.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
First Call I Need You in the Navy This Minute! Our Country Will Always Be Proudest of Those Who Answered the First Call.
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Recruiting poster showing Uncle Sam. Navy recruiting stations: 34 East 23rd Street, New York; 115 Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn. Copyright by Leslie-Judge Co. Forms part of: Willard and Dorothy Straight Collection.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - World War I Posters
The Frenchwoman in War-Time
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Scene depicting French women in war-time. One woman is working in a factory, one is nursing her child, and another woman is hoeing in the field. In the background is an outline of Victory. French women made up over 40 percent of the work force during the war. Over two million were recruited into positions in heavy industry. Films were used for the first time as entertainment at Les Foyers du Soldats for soldiers on leave, and also to keep the homefront abreast of activities of the war in a romantic and humanizing way. Signed: G. Capon. Promotional goal: Fr. K8.J7. 1917//Fr. F34.J7. 1917. Item is no. 233 & 283 in a printed checklist available in the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Reading Room.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - World War I Posters