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  • Elasticity
Breaking the Mold
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In this math activity, students conduct a strength test using modeling clay, creating their own stress vs. strain graphs, which they compare to typical steel and concrete graphs. They learn the difference between brittle and ductile materials and how understanding the strength of materials, especially steel and concrete, is important for engineers who design bridges and structures.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Chris Valenti
Denali Lander
Denise W. Carlson
Joe Friedrichsen
Jonathan S. Goode
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Natalie Mach
Date Added:
02/19/2009
Collision Lab
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Investigate collisions on an air hockey table. Set up your own experiments: vary the number of discs, masses and initial conditions. Is momentum conserved? Is kinetic energy conserved? Vary the elasticity and see what happens.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Ariel Paul
Jon Olson
Kathy Perkins
Mike Dubson
Mindy Gratny
Sam Reid
Trish Loeblein
Date Added:
10/01/2010
Does My Model Valve Stack up to the Real Thing?
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Following the steps of the iterative engineering design process, student teams use what they learned in the previous lessons and activity in this unit to research and choose materials for their model heart valves and test those materials to compare their properties to known properties of real heart valve tissues. Once testing is complete, they choose final materials and design and construct prototype valve models, then test them and evaluate their data. Based on their evaluations, students consider how they might redesign their models for improvement and then change some aspect of their models and retest aiming to design optimal heart valve models as solutions to the unit's overarching design challenge. They conclude by presenting for client review, in both verbal and written portfolio/report formats, summaries and descriptions of their final products with supporting data.

Subject:
Engineering
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Michael Duplessis
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Elasticity
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Animated PowerPoint's originally created to assist deaf students to learn the concept and math of Elasticity of Demand.  

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Edward Einhouse
Date Added:
03/28/2017
Elasticity & Young's Modulus for Tissue Analysis
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Educational Use
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As part of the engineering design process to create testable model heart valves, students learn about the forces at play in the human body to open and close aortic valves. They learn about blood flow forces, elasticity, stress, strain, valve structure and tissue properties, and Young's modulus, including laminar and oscillatory flow, stress vs. strain relationship and how to calculate Young's modulus. They complete some practice problems that use the equations learned in the lesson mathematical functions that relate to the functioning of the human heart. With this understanding, students are ready for the associated activity, during which they research and test materials and incorporate the most suitable to design, build and test their own prototype model heart valves.

Subject:
Engineering
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Michael Duplessis
Date Added:
10/14/2015
How High Can a Super Ball Bounce?
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Educational Use
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Students determine the coefficient of restitution (or the elasticity) for super balls. Working in pairs, they drop balls from a meter height and determine how high they bounce. They measure, record and repeat the process to gather data to calculate average bounce heights and coefficients of elasticity. Then they extrapolate to determine the height the ball would bounce if dropped from much higher heights.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mark Moldwin
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Mechanics of Elastic Solids
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Educational Use
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After conducting the associated activity, students are introduced to the material behavior of elastic solids. Engineering stress and strain are defined and their importance in designing devices and systems is explained. How engineers measure, calculate and interpret properties of elastic materials is addressed. Students calculate stress, strain and modulus of elasticity, and learn about the typical engineering stress-strain diagram (graph) of an elastic material.

Subject:
Engineering
Life Science
Mathematics
Physics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Brandi N. Briggs
Marissa H. Forbes
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Molecular Structure of Muscovite
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Muscovite, often called white mica, is a rock forming mineral that has a layered structure of sheets of aluminum silicate weakly bonded together by layers of potassium ions. Due to its perfect cleavage, elasticity, and low thermal conductivity, muscovite is often used for electrical and thermal insulation applications and also as a lubricant. Finely ground muscovite is sometimes used to make special surfaces in prints and paintings.

Subject:
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
05/02/2003
The Plastic Test
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Educational Use
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After a brief history of plastics, students look more closely as some examples from the abundant types of plastics found in our day-to-day lives. They are introduced to the mechanical properties of plastics, including their stress-strain relationships, which determine their suitability for different industrial and product applications. These physical properties enable plastics to be fabricated into a wide range of products. Students learn about the different roles that plastics play in our lives, Young's modulus, and the effects that plastics have on our environment. Then students act as industrial engineers, conducting tests to compare different plastics and performing a cost-benefit analysis to determine which are the most cost-effective for a given application, based on their costs and measured physical properties.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Joseph Frezzo
Peter James Baker
Sharon Holiday
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Price Elasticity of Demand Experiment
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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This interactive and collaborative activity asks students to first react to price changes and then analyze the results. Instructors can upload the materials to their own Google drives and run the experiment repeatedly to generate new data and demonstrate trends. This resource was developed by Birjees Ashraf, Sophie Haci, Renee Edwards, and Charles Hackner.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
OpenStax, Rice University
Date Added:
07/06/2018
Principles of Macroeconomics 2e
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Principles of Macroeconomics 2e covers the scope and sequence of most introductory economics courses. The text includes many current examples, which are handled in a politically equitable way. The outcome is a balanced approach to the theory and application of economics concepts. The second edition has been thoroughly revised to increase clarity, update data and current event impacts, and incorporate the feedback from many reviewers and adopters.Changes made in Principles of Macroeconomics 2e are described in the preface and the transition guide to help instructors transition to the second edition.

Subject:
Social Science
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Principles of Microeconomics
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a basic understanding of the principles of microeconomics. At its core, the study of economics deals with the choices and decisions that have to be made in order to manage scarce resources available to us. Microeconomics is the branch of economics that pertains to decisions made at the individual level, i.e. by individual consumers or individual firms, after evaluating resources, costs, and tradeoffs. "The economy" refers to the marketplace or system in which these choices interact with one another. In this course, the student will learn how and why these decisions are made and how they affect one another in the economy. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Think intuitively about economic problems; Identify how individual economic agents make rational choices given scarce resources and will know how to optimize the use of resources at hand; Understand some simplistic economic models related to Production, Trade, and the Circular Flow of Resources; Analyze and apply the mechanics of Demand and Supply for Individuals, Firms, and the Market; Apply the concept of Marginal Analysis in order to make optimal choices and identify whether the choices are 'efficient' or 'equitable'; Apply the concept of Elasticity as a measure of responsiveness to various variables; Identify the characteristic differences amongst various market structures, namely, Perfectly Competitive Markets, Non-Competitive Markets, and Imperfectly Competitive Markets and understand the differences in their operation; Analyze how the Demand and Supply technique works for the Resource Markets. (Economics 101; See also: Business Administration 200)

Subject:
Management
Economics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/18/2011
Silly Semi-Solids
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Educational Use
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Student teams make polymers using ordinary household supplies (glue, borax, water). They experiment with the semi-solid material when warm and cold to see and feel its elastic and viscous properties. Students will begin to understand how the electrical forces between particles change as temperature or the force applied to the substance changes. Is it a solid, a liquid, or something in between? How might it be used?

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Jacqueline Lanfranchi
Mark Bronski
Mike Galecki
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Tax Incidence
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

PowerPoint's originally created to assist deaf students to interpret supply and demand graphs, as they relate to elasticity of demand and tax incidence.  

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Edward Einhouse
Date Added:
03/29/2017
UH Microeconomics 2019
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

What is economics and why should you spend your time learning it? After all, there are other disciplines you could be studying, and other ways you could be spending your time. As the Bring it Home feature just mentioned, making choices is at the heart of what economists study, and your decision to take this course is as much an economic decision as anything else.

Economics is probably not what you think it is. It is not primarily about money or finance. It is not primarily about business. It is not mathematics. What is it then? It is both a subject area and a way of viewing the world.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Hawaii
Provider Set:
Pressbooks
Author:
Cynthia Foreman
Thomas Scheiding
Date Added:
09/10/2019