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Blueprint Reading
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Unit 1 covers the introduction and about the drawings I have my student do before introducing blueprint reading. Since I only have a short time to cover blueprint this gives them a little better understanding of what blueprints are and how they are used.
Unit 2 is a short video covering basic concepts of blueprint reading,
Unit 3 can be used for lectures over blueprinting. It uses the website WikiHow and it has three parts with several sections in each. It has diagram included with each section, It also explains various places one can learn more about blueprint reading,

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Career and Technical Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Primary Source
Author:
David Russell
Date Added:
07/09/2019
Math, Grade 7
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Four full-year digital course, built from the ground up and fully-aligned to the Common Core State Standards, for 7th grade Mathematics. Created using research-based approaches to teaching and learning, the Open Access Common Core Course for Mathematics is designed with student-centered learning in mind, including activities for students to develop valuable 21st century skills and academic mindset.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
Math, Grade 7, Proportional Relationships
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Proportional Relationships

Type of Unit: Concept

Prior Knowledge

Students should be able to:

Understand what a rate and ratio are.
Make a ratio table.
Make a graph using values from a ratio table.

Lesson Flow

Students start the unit by predicting what will happen in certain situations. They intuitively discover they can predict the situations that are proportional and might have a hard time predicting the ones that are not. In Lessons 2–4, students use the same three situations to explore proportional relationships. Two of the relationships are proportional and one is not. They look at these situations in tables, equations, and graphs. After Lesson 4, students realize a proportional relationship is represented on a graph as a straight line that passes through the origin. In Lesson 5, they look at straight lines that do not represent a proportional relationship. Lesson 6 focuses on the idea of how a proportion that they solved in sixth grade relates to a proportional relationship. They follow that by looking at rates expressed as fractions, finding the unit rate (the constant of proportionality), and then using the constant of proportionality to solve a problem. In Lesson 8, students fine-tune their definition of proportional relationship by looking at situations and determining if they represent proportional relationships and justifying their reasoning. They then apply what they have learned to a situation about flags and stars and extend that thinking to comparing two prices—examining the equations and the graphs. The Putting It Together lesson has them solve two problems and then critique other student work.

Gallery 1 provides students with additional proportional relationship problems.

The second part of the unit works with percents. First, percents are tied to proportional relationships, and then students examine percent situations as formulas, graphs, and tables. They then move to a new context—salary increase—and see the similarities with sales taxes. Next, students explore percent decrease, and then they analyze inaccurate statements involving percents, explaining why the statements are incorrect. Students end this sequence of lessons with a formative assessment that focuses on percent increase and percent decrease and ties it to decimals.

Students have ample opportunities to check, deepen, and apply their understanding of proportional relationships, including percents, with the selection of problems in Gallery 2.

Subject:
Mathematics
Ratios and Proportions
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
Math, Grade 7, Proportional Relationships, Identifying Proportional Relationships
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CC BY-NC
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Students determine whether a relationship between two quantities that vary is a proportional relationship in three different situations: the relationship between the dimensions of the actual Empire State Building and a miniature model of the building; the relationship between the distance and time to travel to an amusement park; and the relationship between time and temperature at an amusement park.Key ConceptsWhen the ratio between two varying quantities remains constant, the relationship between the two quantities is called a proportional relationship. For a ratio A:B, the proportional relationship can be described as the collection of ratios equivalent to A:B, or cA:cB, where c is positive.Goals and Learning ObjectivesIdentify proportional relationships.Explain why a situation represents a proportional relationship or why it does not.Determine missing values in a table of quantities based on a proportional relationship.

Subject:
Ratios and Proportions
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
PhET Simulation: Estimation
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This interactive Flash animation allows students to explore size estimation in one, two and three dimensions. Multiple levels of difficulty allow for progressive skill improvement. In the simplest level, users estimate the number of small line segments that can fit into a larger line segment. Intermediate and advanced levels offer feature games that explore area of rectangles and circles, and volume of spheres and cubes. Related lesson plans and student guides are available for middle school and high school classroom instruction. Editor's Note: When the linear dimensions of an object change by some factor, its area and volume change disproportionately: area in proportion to the square of the factor and volume in proportion to its cube. This concept is the subject of entrenched misconception among many adults. This game-like simulation allows kids to use spatial reasoning, rather than formulas, to construct geometric sense of area and volume. This is part of a larger collection developed by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET).

Subject:
Education
Mathematics
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Michael Dubson
Mindy Gratny
Date Added:
01/22/2006
Redesigning a Classroom for the Visually Impaired
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Students practice human-centered design by imagining, designing and prototyping a product to improve classroom accessibility for the visually impaired. To begin, they wear low-vision simulation goggles (or blindfolds) and walk with canes to navigate through a classroom in order to experience what it feels like to be visually impaired. Student teams follow the steps of the engineering design process to formulate their ideas, draw them by hand and using free, online Tinkercad software, and then 3D-print (or construct with foam core board and hot glue) a 1:20-scale model of the classroom that includes the product idea and selected furniture items. Teams use a morphological chart and an evaluation matrix to quantitatively compare and evaluate possible design solutions, narrowing their ideas into one final solution to pursue. To conclude, teams make posters that summarize their projects.

Subject:
Engineering
Geometry
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
Activities
Author:
Manuel Figueroa
Date Added:
02/17/2017
Special Relativity
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CC BY-SA
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The Special Theory of Relativity is a theory of classical physics that was developed at the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth century. It changed our understanding of older physical theories such as Newtonian Physics and led to early Quantum Theory and later the Theory of General Relativity. Special Relativity is one of the foundation blocks of physics.

This book will introduce the reader to, perhaps, the most profound discovery of the twentieth century and the modern world: the universe has at least four dimensions.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
07/27/2016
The Universal Language of Engineering Drawings
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Students practice the ability to produce clear, complete, accurate and detailed design drawings through an engineering design challenge. Using only the specified materials, teams are challenged to draw a design for a wind-powered car. Then, they trade engineering drawings with another group and attempt to construct the model cars in order to determine how successfully the original design intentions were communicated through sketches, dimensions and instructions.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Jacob Crosby
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Why Beehive Honeycombs Have a Hexagonal Shape
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Beavers are generally known as the engineers of the animal world. In fact the beaver is MIT's mascot! But honeybees might be better engineers than beavers! And in this lesson involving geometry in interesting ways, you'll see why! Honeybees, over time, have optimized the design of their beehives. Mathematicians can do no better. In this lesson, students will learn how to find the areas of shapes (triangles, squares, hexagons) in terms of the radius of a circle drawn inside of these shapes. They will also learn to compare those shapes to see which one is the most efficient for beehives. This lesson also discusses the three-dimensional shape of the honeycomb and shows how bees have optimized that in multiple dimensions. During classroom breaks, students will do active learning around the mathematics involved in this engineering expertise of honeybees. Students should be conversant in geometry, and a little calculus and differential equations would help, but not mandatory.

Subject:
Engineering
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Fatma Al-Qatani
Date Added:
02/13/2015