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The 25th Amendment: Presidential Disability & Succession and Vice Presidential Vacancies
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This eLesson by Dr. Felix Yerace will provide students with an opportunity to learn about the text of the Twenty-Fifth Amendment as well as its historical usage and potential need. It will ask them to consider why such an Amendment was deemed necessary and how it has been, and could be, used. It will also give students the opportunity to debate possible applications of the Twenty-Fifth Amendment.

Subject:
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tom Marabello
Date Added:
09/20/2021
9/11 and the Constitution
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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The anniversaries of the terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001, and the signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787, provide us an opportunity to reflect upon who we are as Americans, examine our most fundamental values and principles and affirm our commitment to them, and evaluate progress toward the realization of American ideals and propose actions that might narrow the gap between these ideals and reality. The following lessons are designed to accomplish these goals.

Subject:
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Center Staff
Date Added:
09/24/2021
Alexander Hamilton
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Manuscripts, images, and historic newspapers document the life and accomplishments of Alexander Hamilton. This set also includes a Teacher's Guide with historical context and teaching suggestions. Manuscripts, images, and historic newspapers document the life and accomplishments of Alexander Hamilton'

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Primary Source Set
Date Added:
08/02/2021
American Government
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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 American Government is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the single-semester American government course. This title includes innovative features designed to enhance student learning, including Insider Perspective features and a Get Connected Module that shows students how they can get engaged in the political process. The book provides an important opportunity for students to learn the core concepts of American government and understand how those concepts apply to their lives and the world around them. American Government includes updated information on the 2016 presidential election.Senior Contributing AuthorsGlen Krutz (Content Lead), University of OklahomaSylvie Waskiewicz, PhD (Lead Editor)

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
01/06/2016
American Government
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Contents include:

1. Why Government? Why Politics? 2. The U.S. System of Constitutional Government 3. Congress 4. The Presidency 5. The Judiciary 6. Federalism 7. The Media, Government, and Politics 8. Public Opinion 9. Political Ideology 10. Political Participation 11. Political Parties 12. Interest Groups 13. Public Policy 14. Economic Policy 15. Food Policy 16. Crime Policy 17. Global Affairs 18. Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University Press of Florida
Author:
Mirya Holman
Timothy Lenz
Date Added:
10/05/2022
The Articles of Confederation and The US Constitution
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This inquiry is designed to be an overview of the governments described in the Articles of Confederation and the US Constitution for an 8th-grade social studies class.  Both History and Geography are part of this inquiry.  Students will examine the size and diversity of the 13 original American states.  They will review the text of both documents.  Students will evaluate the structures of government created and will prioritize those structures in relation to the historical period. Resource created by Jeff Hart, Boyd County Public Schools, as part of the Nebraska ESUCC Social Studies Special Projects 2022 - Inquiry Design Model (IDM).

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
ESU Coordinating Council
ESU Coordinating Council
Date Added:
08/23/2022
Asian American & Pacific Islander Perspectives within Humanities Education
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Organized around the compelling question "How have Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders engaged civically and contributed to U.S. culture?" and grounded in inquiry-based teaching and learning, this lesson brings history, civics, and the arts together to learn about the experiences and perspectives of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) in U.S. history. Primary sources, literature, and works of art created by AAPI individuals and related organizations provide an historical as well as contemporary context for concepts and issues including civic participation, immigration, and culture.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
09/06/2019
Benjamin Franklin and the U.S. Constitution - Beginning Level
Read the Fine Print
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This lesson on Benjamin Franklin and the U.S. Constitution covers Civics Test items from two sections: Principles of American Democracy and Colonial Period and Independence. It briefly introduces the branches of government, a topic which will be covered in more detail in separate lessons. We would recommend teaching the lessons on George Washington and Thomas Jefferson before introducing this lesson. The readings and pictures should help students understand the new concepts. As with previous lessons, the goal for the students is to comprehend and answer the Civics Test items correctly. Coveris civics test items 1, 2, 3, 12, 13, 14, 65, 66, 67, and 68.

Subject:
Language Education (ESL)
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
Provider Set:
Beginning Level Lesson Plans
Date Added:
09/04/2015
Bill of Rights and Other Amendments - Beginning Level
Read the Fine Print
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This lesson explains the concept of amendments and the background of the Bill of Rights in relation to the Constitution. We recommend teaching the lesson on Benjamin Franklin and the U.S. Constitution prior to this one. This lesson covers details about the First Amendment and voting rights. Covers civics test items 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 48, 50, 51, 54, and 66.

Subject:
Language Education (ESL)
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
Provider Set:
Beginning Level Lesson Plans
Date Added:
09/04/2015
The Citizenship Complex: Why the Vote Matters in the Race for Freedom and Equality for All
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Not all people are born equal or free but there is an expectation of both when you are a citizen of the United States. Our struggles to earn the base level of representation are quickly forgotten as we look for another group to demonize. In my unit we will discover why George Washington was ahead of his time with his warning about "factions" and how their existence makes freedom and equality harder to bridge. As we trek through time highlighting issues such as the abolition of slavery, support for women's suffrage, and the challenges that face Asian and LGBTQIA communities my hope is that student understand the sacrifices made to be accepted and to earn the right to vote but more importantly the difficulty in being welcomed into American society.

The “Citizenship Complex” is the process by which groups gain full inclusion. To understand it, one must look to the intersection of law, citizenship and the Constitution. The unit aims to provide a more complex history of our nation, to tell a more earnest story of how the American identity became a mosaic of human struggle, and to offer a more robust and enlightening study of these issues so that as students recognize the power of citizenship they will take a more hopeful view of what our nation will look like in the future. By engaging in the sophisticated discussions of the past, identifying why some groups supported each other and scapegoated others, and learning about the importance of supporting efforts at inclusion, our students should become more informed, open-minded, and ready for the globalized world of the 21 st Century.

The unit will focus on four groups that have experienced the “Citizenship Complex”: African-American slaves, women, Asian immigrants, and the LGBTQIA community. By comparing these groups over time, we will really be able to unearth the cycles behind the Citizenship Complex and understand that American citizenship means at different times in our country’s history.

Subject:
U.S. History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume III
Date Added:
08/01/2016
Civics and Government Lessons
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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These lessons concern the United States Constitution Article 1 concerning the establishment and purpose of the Legislative Branch of the three branches of the US Government.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Primary Source
Reading
Author:
Pamela Raines
Date Added:
07/13/2022
The Civil Rights Act and the ADA
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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This activity asks students to read and compare the language of selected civil rights legislation.By tracing the changes in language (from "handicapped" to "people with disabilities," for example) and the necessity of restating and reinforcing Constitutional rights, the analysis likewise asks them to think about prejudice, stigma and fundamental rights and freedoms.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
11/28/2016
Close Reading Exemplar: Words We Live By (Grade 8)
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By reading and re-reading the Constitutional passages closely combined with classroom discussion about it, students will explore the questions Monk raises and perhaps even pursue additional avenues of inquiry. When combined with writing about the passage and teacher feedback, students will form a deeper appreciation not only of MonkŐs argument and the value of struggling with complex text, but of the Preamble of the Constitution itself. This close reading exemplar is intended to model how teachers can support their students as they undergo the kind of careful reading the Common Core State Standards require. Teachers are encouraged to take these exemplars and modify them to suit the needs of their students.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
03/13/2015
“Congress, the President, and the Constitution: Then and Now”
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This lesson will give your students the chance to compare and contrast Articles I and II of the Constitution, and the powers delegated to both the legislative and executive branches.  Students will deeply examine the historic and current relationship between Congress and the President and how power and influence have seemed to ebb and flow between them over more than 200 years, including a look at the War Powers Act and how that has impacted the push-pull between Congress and the President, looking at some case studies from the past 35 years.

Subject:
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tom Marabello
Date Added:
09/20/2021
"The Constitution vs. The Articles of Confederation"
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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To ensure and enhance student understanding of concepts related to the Constitution and Articles of Confederation, specifically students will be able to:Explain the larger ideas of federalism vs. anti-federalism or states’ rights, and how those ideas feed into people’s overall political beliefs.Identify and explain the various branches of the federal government, the obstacles that had been faced under the Articles of Confederation, and how this new federalist/republican model of government grew out of those difficulties.Identify and explain the various powers delegated to the states versus federal government in both documents, what changed, and why.

Subject:
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tom Marabello
Date Added:
09/17/2021
Creating Peaceful Change
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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While studying the Articles of Confederation government and the Constitutional Convention in this problem-based learning module, the students will determine the benefits of peacefully changing an inept government.  They will deduce the crucial steps needed for peaceful change to happen within a society.  An area of research will be chosen to help solve a problem critical to the students’ middle school lives.  Feedback will be gathered through a video interview or a Google Form survey of crucial stakeholders.  Students will research the alternatives to improve upon their selected problem.  Students will present their findings to a decision maker and wait to receive feedback.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Date Added:
11/22/2017