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  • Communicable Diseases
Contemporary Health Concerns
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This course addresses contemporary health concerns and will inform students to: 1) Assess health behavior choices, apply that information to everyday life for the improvement of individual, family, and community well-being; 2) Identify preconceived ideas about knowledge, values, and behavior that affect health and compare with established research and accepted scientific evidence.

Learning Objectives: The student will be able to: appraise and assess public attitudes and behavior regarding health and disease; recognize, examine and formulate the importance of immunizations; recognize and assess public bias towards aging, diabetes, epilepsy, STDs, etc.; differentiate the major classifications of communicable and non-communicable diseases; examine and discuss the role of epidemiology in Public Health; assess and analyze nutritional behavior; identify the major means of transmission for communicable diseases; identify and examine immunizations in relationship to immunity; examine the three levels of Health Promotion/Disease Prevention; identify, compare, and discuss normal versus abnormal patterns of behavior; identify and compare the major classifications of drugs; examine and appraise patterns of drug abuse; compare cultural health behaviors and suggest associated consequences.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Provider:
Foothill College
Provider Set:
Foothill Global Access Online Learning
Author:
Judy Baker, Ph.D.
Date Added:
09/14/2012
An Introduction to Global Health - Climate Change and Health (18:01)
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Our planet is currently being challenged by dramatic changes to earth and human systems under the influence of climate change and variability. These include changes of population and environmental dynamics that impacts human health. Thus, climate change is considered the biggest threat to human health in the 21st century. Health impacts can be direct typically related to extreme weather events; indirect with linkages to climate change induced environmental alterations and damage or in relation to displacement, conflict and social disruption. This presentation provides a series of examples of changes of environmental and social determinants of health with negative or positive health impacts. These include impacts on communicable diseases, non-communicable diseases and mental health of importance in particular in vulnerable urban and rural settings as well as among sensitive community groups exposed to variations in temperature and precipitation patterns.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen
Provider Set:
An Introduction to Global Health
Author:
Scientist Peter Furu
Date Added:
01/07/2013
An Introduction to Global Health - Disease-specific Risk Factors - Part 1 of 2 (09:52)
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Infectious diseases have a specific, ethiological cause, e.g. a microbe such as tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, most people exposed to TB does not develop the disease. What determines this may be poverty, weakening of the person by other diseases or smoking and alcohol. So-called life-style diseases are (also) determined by the way you live, and include prevalent non-communicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardio-vascular diseases, but besides of risk factors such as smoking and drinking or over-eating, the living conditions matter equally and sometimes more. The environment, climate changes, urbanization, socio-economic factors all impact health and disease. When an individual grows older, patterns of his/her diseases changes: the same applies when a society grows ‘older’.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen
Provider Set:
An Introduction to Global Health
Author:
Professor Ib C. Bygbjerg
Date Added:
01/07/2013
An Introduction to Global Health - Disease-specific Risk Factors - Part 2 of 2 (12:08)
Rating

Previously infectious diseases previously caused the majority of ill-health and premature death globally, but in high- and middle-income countries during the 20.th century infectious diseases – with the exception of HIV – declined. Introduction of hygiene and discovery of microbes and later vaccines an antibiotics contributed to the decline, but changing living conditions with better housing, nutrition, water and sanitation were the main drivers of infectious diseases’ decline.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen
Provider Set:
An Introduction to Global Health
Author:
Professor Ib C. Bygbjerg
Date Added:
01/07/2013
An Introduction to Global Health - Infectious Diseases - Part 1 of 2 (12:13)
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This presentation provides an introduction to infectious diseases like tuberculosis, vector-borne diseases, puerperal sepsis, streptococcus septicemia, etc. and how these diseases have affected global health over the last two centuries and decades.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen
Provider Set:
An Introduction to Global Health
Author:
Professor Ib C. Bygbjerg
Date Added:
01/07/2013
An Introduction to Global Health - Infectious Diseases - Part 2 of 2 (07:37)
Rating

In this presentation the achievement regarding the 8 millennium goals (MDG), set by the United Nation’s member states to be reached by 2015 are reviewed, with emphasis on Infectious diseases, such as HIV, TB malaria and other vector-borne diseases, including Chagas’ disease and African trypanosomiasis, the latter belong to the ‘neglected tropical diseases’. What made it happen and why (not) is discussed.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen
Provider Set:
An Introduction to Global Health
Author:
Professor Ib C. Bygbjerg
Date Added:
01/07/2014
An Introduction to Global Health - Joint Risk Factors (14:49)
Rating

In this presentation the global burden of diseases – deaths as well as disabilities – jointly named DALYs – is presented and differences and similarities between lo-, middle-, and high-income countries presently and over time are presented. The strict division between non-communicable and communicable (infectious) diseases is also challenged, and propositions on how to manage them jointly are given. The double burden of NCD+overnutrition and CD+undernutrition in societies in fast transition is presented. The present vs. the expected global burden of diseases by the year 2030 are also introduced.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen
Provider Set:
An Introduction to Global Health
Author:
Professor Ib Bygbjerg
Date Added:
01/07/2013
An Introduction to Global Health - Malaria - The Transition (14:36)
Rating

Despite a steady decline in recent years, malaria continues to be a major cause of ill health and poverty in large parts of the world. The purpose of this video lesson is to get the student to think critically about what might have caused this change, and how infection and disease is affected by human intervention and other drivers of change. Additionally, to encourage the student to engage actively in efforts to combat major infectious disease obstacles to a more equitable world.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen
Provider Set:
An Introduction to Global Health
Author:
Professor Lars Hviid
Date Added:
01/07/2016
PBL Lesson Plan - Germs, Bacteria, and Communicable Diseases
Conditions of Use:
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This lesson plan is a Problem-Based Learning Lesson Plan, which means that the students will work together in groups to complete portions of the lesson. There are also portions of the lesson that require individual work, but they always share their findings with their classmates, whether in person or online.

This lesson is about germs, bacteria, and communicable diseases. The students will learn about germs and how to prevent the spread of germs. They will also learn how germs and bacteria cause communicable diseases. The students will participate in several activities, and they should have a solid grasp of the subjects by the time they complete the culminating, or final, activity.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Elementary Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Game
Interactive
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Reading
Author:
Tiana Davis
Date Added:
04/23/2019
SDG 3.3: Communicable diseases
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By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases and combat hepatitis, water-borne diseases and other communicable diseases
Professor Tehmina Mustafa, CIH, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen

Mustafa began by pointing out that the UN Millennium Development Goals, which preceded the SDGs (Goal 6: COMBAT HIV/AIDS, MALARIA AND OTHER DISEASES), had only highlighted a few global communicable diseases. The SDGs continue to address the challenges of communicable disease epidemics, but have a widened focus to include a number of other important diseases. Also diseases that are not only pathogen caused.

Mustafa underlined that communicable disease epidemics highlight other global issues such as social injustice and social inequality. The years of life lost to these diseases is much higher in “hot-spots”, generally located in low- and middle-income countries.

According to Mustafa, the approaches included in the SDGs are more integrated than those of the MDGs and will be better able to lead to research directions that will help to alleviate the health and economic implications of communicable disease outbreaks.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
University of Bergen
Date Added:
09/13/2018
What are Communicable Diseases and How Can We Prevent Some of Them?
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Students will learn that microorganisms can get inside one's body and they may keep it from working properly. Students will learn that vaccinations help to prevent some diseases but not others.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Kathy DeCock
Date Added:
08/16/2012