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Arranging for independence
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Erin Espinoza's kindergarten classroom encourages children to learn on their own. A classroom profile.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Articles & More
Author:
Sydney Brown
Date Added:
08/17/1971
Assignments for Strategies and Instruction
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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Several assignments are used for this course, including writing lesson plans, writing a unit plan, creating supplemental items for the unit plan, and designing a classroom management plan. In my course, I assign two units with three lesson plans included in each unit. This is designed for Early Childhood, but it can be edited for secondary. 

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jeanne Burth
Becoming an Online Teacher
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Remix and Share
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For even the most experienced classroom teacher, teaching online requires a thoughtful transition to the new environment.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Articles & More
Author:
Bobby Hobgood
Date Added:
10/14/2003
Breaking the Attention-Seeking Habit: The Power of Random Positive Teacher Attention
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Some students misbehave because they are trying to attract teacher attention. Surprisingly, many students who value adult attention don't really care if it is positive (praise) or negative attention (reprimands)--they just want attention!
Unfortunately, instructors with students who thrive on teacher attention can easily fall into a 'reprimand trap.' The scenario might unfold much like this: First, the student misbehaves. Then the teacher approaches the student and reprimands him or her for misbehaving. Because the student finds the negative teacher attention to be reinforcing, he or she continues to misbehave-and the teacher naturally responds by reprimanding the student more often! An escalating, predictable cycle is established, with the student repeatedly acting-out and teacher reprimanding him or her.
Teachers can break out of this cycle, though, by using 'random positive attention' with students. Essentially, the instructor starts to ignore student attention-seeking behaviors, while at the same time 'randomly' giving the student positive attention. That is, the student receives regular positive teacher attention but at times unconnected to misbehavior. So the student still gets the adult attention that he or she craves. More importantly, the link between student misbehavior and resulting negative teacher attention is broken.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
02/10/2014
Build a Student Motivation Trap to Increase Academic Engagement
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Motivating a reluctant student to complete schoolwork is not easy. In a typical classroom, students can choose from a number of sources of potential reinforcement (Billington & DiTommaso, 2003)--and academic tasks often take a back seat to competing behaviors such as talking with peers. One way that teachers can increase the attractiveness of schoolwork is by structuring lessons or assignments around topics or activities of high interest to the student (Miller et al., 2003).In fact, with planning, the teacher can set up a 'trap' that uses motivating elements to capture a student's attention to complete academic tasks (Alber & Heward, 1996). Here is a 6-step blue-print for building an academic 'motivation trap' (adapted from Alber & Heward, 1996).

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
02/10/2014
Calming the Agitated Student
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Students can sometimes have emotional outbursts in school settings. This fact will not surprise many teachers, who have had repeated experience in responding to serious classroom episodes of student agitation. Such outbursts can be attributed in part to the relatively high incidence of mental health issues among children and youth. It is estimated, for example, that at least one in five students in American schools will experience a mental health disorder by adolescence (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999). But even students not identified as having behavioral or emotional disorders may occasionally have episodes of agitation triggered by situational factors such as peer bullying, frustration over poor academic performance, stressful family relationships, or perceived mistreatment by educators.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
02/10/2014
Classroom Management During Centers
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Ryan Berger is in the middle of his first year as a new Kindergarten teacher. He asks Jim Knight to observe a lesson and share strategies to help him specifically with transitioning students between centers. Mr. Knight looks for classroom management strategies he can recommend to help Mr. Berger improve class structure.Mr. Berger shares that transitioning from working with 5th graders to kindergarteners has been stressful and some of the strategies he previously used do not work as well with kindergarteners.Time used during transitions is a major focus of the discussion. They discuss ways to address content during transitions in order to make effective use of time. Finally, they discuss the importance for taking a step back to observe what students are doing well and what needs to be clarified.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
Classroom Management (Part 1): Learning the Components of a Comprehensive Behavior Management Plan
Rating

This Module—a revision of Who's In Charge? Developing a Comprehensive Behavior Management System—highlights the importance of establishing a comprehensive classroom behavior management system composed of a statement of purpose, rules, procedures, consequences, and an action plan. It also provides information about how culture, classroom factors, and teacher actions can influence student behavior (est. completion time: 1 hour).

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Vanderbilt University
Provider Set:
IRIS Center
Date Added:
09/04/2018
Classroom Management (Part 2): Developing Your Own Comprehensive Behavior Management Plan
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This Module—a revision of You're in Charge! Developing Your Own Comprehensive Behavior Management Plan—reviews the major components of classroom management (including rules, procedures, and consequences) and guides users through the steps of creating their own comprehensive behavior plan. The module is a companion to Classroom Management (Part 1): Learning the Components of a Comprehensive Behavior Management Plan (est. completion time: 2 hours).

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Vanderbilt University
Provider Set:
IRIS Center
Date Added:
09/04/2018
Collaborative Culture: Routines
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Our approach to classroom management is based on the premise that students learn to make good choices independently and hold themselves accountable for their behavior. Self-management is always a process in need of refinement. Establishing routines is an essential part of this process. Routines give students a roadmap for important moments during their day and allow them to internalize and take ownership of their choices and move quickly into new learning experiences. This internalization, engagement, and ownership is achieved through the mindful scaffolding of routines.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
EL Education
Date Added:
07/27/2018
Dodging the Power-Struggle Trap: Ideas for Teachers
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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he teacher's most important objective when faced with a defiant or non-compliant student is to remain outwardly calm. Educators who react to defiant behavior by becoming visibly angry, raising their voices, or attempting to intimidate the student may actually succeed only in making the student's oppositional behavior worse! While the strategies listed here may calm an oppositional student, their main purpose is to help the teacher to keep his or her cool. Remember: any conflict requires at least two people. A power struggle can be avoided if the instructor does not choose to take part in that struggle.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
02/10/2014
Don't Put It Down, Put It Up!
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In a fifth grade classroom based around projects, everything has its place. This classroom profile shows you the design and purpose of Debra Harwell-Braun's fifth-grade classroom.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Articles & More
Date Added:
03/07/2005
Don't Smile 'Til December? Humor in the Classroom
Rating

Galeet Cohen, 10th Grade Language Arts teacher at Central High in Pennsylvania, believes that adding humor to her interaction is essential. Galeet reminds us that teachers and students spend long days in classrooms, and humor can make it a good time.Ms. Cohen also uses humor to let students know she is aware of what they are doing and prefers her humor approach to strict rules or detention. She shares that sometimes students are "just testing you" and you can easily diffuse a situation calmly and with humor.

Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/25/2013
ELA Throughout the Day
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Ms. Noonan has class meetings every morning as part of her daily routine. She demonstrates here how toset ups systems and structures that integrate English Language Arts throughout the day.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Author:
Madeline Noonan
Date Added:
11/02/2012
Early Childhood Behavior Management: Developing and Teaching Rules
Rating

This Module, a DEC-recommended resource, includes information on how to create developmentally appropriate behavior rules for early childhood classrooms so that they link to a given school's behavior expectations. The importance of communication with families about rules and expected behaviors is also stressed (est. completion time: 1.5 hours).

Subject:
Early Childhood Development
Special Education
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Vanderbilt University
Provider Set:
IRIS Center
Date Added:
09/05/2018