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  • Civil Liberties
10. Civil Liberties and Civil Rights
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

What is the difference between a liberty and a right? Both words appear in the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights. The distinction between the two has always been blurred, and today the concepts are often used interchangeably. However, they do refer to different kinds of guaranteed protections.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
American Government
Date Added:
12/05/2014
51. America in the Second World War
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

World War II was fought over differences left unresolved after World War I. Over 400,000 Americans perished in the four years of involvement, an American death rate second only to the Civil War. Twelve million victims perished from Nazi atrocities in the Holocaust. The deaths of twenty million Russians created a defensive Soviet mindset that spilled into the postwar era. After all the blood and sacrifice, the Axis powers were defeated, but the Grand Alliance that emerged victorious did not last long. Soon the world was involved in a 45-year struggle that claimed millions of additional lives — the Cold War.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
American Government
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

 American Government is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the single-semester American government course. This title includes innovative features designed to enhance student learning, including Insider Perspective features and a Get Connected Module that shows students how they can get engaged in the political process. The book provides an important opportunity for students to learn the core concepts of American government and understand how those concepts apply to their lives and the world around them. American Government includes updated information on the 2016 presidential election.Senior Contributing AuthorsGlen Krutz (Content Lead), University of OklahomaSylvie Waskiewicz, PhD (Lead Editor)

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
01/06/2016
American Government and Politics (Part I)
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Part I in a 2 part series on U.S. Government and Politics. The following topics are covered: The media; the contributions of the Enlightenment philosophers; the Constitution; Federalism; Civil Liberties; Civil Rights; Political Socialization and Participation; Public Opinion; Political Parties; Campaigns and Elections; Interest Groups. Ancillary materials are available to faculty by contacting tuitej@centralvirginia.edu.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Central Virginia Community College
Author:
Edited by James J. Tuite
Date Added:
08/31/2019
Civil Rights Law
Rating

This course focuses on the rights of all Americans under the federal and state Constitutions and laws. The course surveys the framework of these rights and goes into many specifics, including the rights to equal protection, due process and freedom of religion. Some other fundamental rights, including freedom of speech, are left for other LawShelf courses.

This is an intermediate-level course, focusing on some obscure Constitutional law concepts, but requires no previous experience or knowledge to participate.

The course starts with the structure of civil rights laws and the various sources of those protections. We’ll look at constitutional rights and federal and state civil rights laws.

The second module focuses on equal protection. We’ll look at the history of the equal protection clause and its passage in the wake of the civil war. We’ll look at landmark Supreme Court cases and the standards under which alleged equal protection violations are judged. We’ll also look at the interesting case of “benign” discrimination in the form of affirmative action programs.

Our third module looks at due process. We’ll focus both on procedural due process, which looks at whether the government gave a person a fair opportunity to defend before a deprivation of life, liberty or property, and substantive due process, which ensures that government cannot legislatively deprive people of rights without adequate justification.

Module 4 discusses religious discrimination, including a look at the establishment and free exercise clauses of the First Amendment. We’ll also look at federal laws that try to protect religious freedom, such as the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act, and the long lines of cases those acts have spawned. Finally, we’ll look at accommodations and exceptions from the law that governments must make to accommodate religious freedom.

The last module turns to the practical side of things by discussing federal and state causes of action to vindicate civil rights. We’ll look at federal “Section 1983” actions and comparable state lawsuits. We’ll also focus on the roles of states in protecting civil rights.

By the end of this course, we’re confident that you’ll have a clearer picture of the framework in which our governments and court systems seek to protect our civil rights.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Stephen Haas
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Conversations with History: Diplomacy and the Shaping of a Human Rights Agenda, with John Shattuck
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

UC Berkeley's Harry Kreisler welcomes John Shattuck, Chief Executive Officer, Kennedy Library Foundation, for a discussion of his career and work in the area of civil liberties and human rights. (54 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
U.C. Berkeley
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
05/01/2001
Conversations with History: National Security and the Rule of Law
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes attorney Frederick S. Wyle, a Pentagon official in the Kennedy administration, for a discussion of nuclear weapons policy in Europe during the Cold War. Reflecting on his role as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense in the McNamara Pentagon, Wyle also compares threat perception then with the current response to terrorism. He analyzes the delicate balance that must be found under our constitutional system to adjust to exigent circumstances while preserving the rule of law and civil liberties. (55 minutes)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
U.C. Berkeley
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
03/17/2007
Death Penalty: What Is It? What Do We Think About It?
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In late September 2011, the death penalty dominated news headlines. The stories mostly revolved around the case of Troy Davis, a 42-year old African American man who was convicted of killing a white off-duty police officer in Savannah, Georgia, over 20 years ago. Protests against the death penalty were held across the US and the debate over his guilt captured the attention of thousands internationally as well. Over the years Troy Davis's case has helped fuel the global movement to end the death penalty. After three earlier stays of execution, Troy Davis lost a clemency vote taken by the Georgia Parole Board on September 20, 2011. The following day, he was put to death by lethal injection.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Author:
Marieke van Woerkomspan
Date Added:
09/27/2011
Internet Privacy: A Personal and Political Issue
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this interactive lesson, students consider the issue of internet privacy, both in their own lives and in society, including government spying, parental monitoring, and corporate tracking of consumers. What is the connection and potential conflict between safety and privacy, both on a personal and institutional level?

Subject:
Information Science
Arts and Humanities
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Date Added:
07/06/2013
Introduction to Western Political Thought
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Political thought, otherwise known as political theory or philosophy, is the study of questions concerning power, justice, rights, law, and other issues pertaining to governance. This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and asks how different views on human nature inform the design of government. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: summarize the passage of political thought through the classical, Renaissance, and Enlightenment periods and based on the works of Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and Marx; compare and contrast the differences between Plato and Aristotle with regard to their understandings of the nature of the person, ethics, society, citizenship, and governance; explain the historical and intellectual context in which the political thought that helped to develop the modern state came to be; compare and contrast the concepts of justice, freedom, equality, citizenship, and sovereignty in the works of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau; explain the different versions of, and importance of, 'the state of nature' to political thought; identify the influences of Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau on the development of the United States Constitution; summarize the thoughts of Alexis de Tocqueville on the American political landscape, particularly with regard to religion and equality, and why this has importance beyond the American context; explain Karl Marx's world view, with particular regard to his critique of democracy and the modern, politically liberal, state; how it came to be; and its fundamental link to capitalism. (Political Science 201)

Subject:
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
March on Washington: Teaching Suggestions
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement's 1963 March on Washington is a great teaching opportunity. We offer some helpful resources.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Date Added:
09/27/2013
NSA Surveillance and the Politics of Whistleblowing
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Edward Snowden's leak of classified information about the NSA's surveillance of American citizens has touched off a debate about the need for government secrecy versus the public's right to know. Two student readings and discussion questions probe the controversy.

Subject:
Political Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Date Added:
06/21/2013
The Politics of Immigration Reform
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students explore how the growing power of Latino voters improves chances for comprehensive immigration reform and consider some of the economic benefits of immigration.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Author:
Mark Engler
Date Added:
06/12/2013
Preparing Students for College, Career and Citizenship
Rating

A California Guide to Align Civic Education and the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects. This resource guide provides educators with practices to equip all students with reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and the knowledge, skills and dispositions to become responsible engaged citizens of the 21st century in a coherent, integrated manner that will be meaningful and relevant. The practices in the guide provide civic education approaches to meet the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts. The lesson activities in each of the grade spans follow a natural progression that builds students’ historical knowledge of the foundations of democracy, an understanding of how America’s constitutional principles are reinterpreted over time, and the skills and dispositions needed for effective citizenship. Applied knowledge of history, government and civics is necessary for developing civic competency. Therefore, each series of lessons calls for students to actively participate in activities that strengthen reading, writing, speaking and listening skills in the context of civic dialogue, debate, persuasion and action.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Reading Foundation Skills
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Los Angeles County Office of Education
OER Commons
Provider Set:
Common Core Reference Collection
Date Added:
03/01/2012