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1869: A Report on Schools in North Carolina
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In this lesson, students use a guided reading to look at a report on the status of education in North Carolina in 1869, and discuss the reasons given then for why the Governor and Legislature should support educating North Carolina's children. They are provided an opportunity to compare and contrast the 1869 document against their own ideas about the civic duty to attend school through age sixteen, and its relative value to the state and the country.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Victoria Schaefer
Date Added:
07/06/2004
AP U.S. Government & Politics
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Educational Use
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This course contains five projects that are organized around the following question: “What is the proper role of government in a democracy?” Each project involves political simulations through which students take on roles that help contextualize the content required by the new College Board course framework.

Founders' Intent
Elections
Supreme Court
Congress
Government in Action

Openly licensed PDF unit plans of all the above units are available at this Sprocket Lucas Education Research Platform (scroll to bottom of web page).

Alternately, educators may sign up for free access to the online AP U.S. Government and Politics course that includes additional instructional supports:
https://sprocket.lucasedresearch.org/users/sprocket_access

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Lucas Education Research
Provider Set:
Sprocket
Author:
Knowledge in Action
University of Washington
Date Added:
09/11/2018
Abraham Lincoln - Beginning Level
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In planning this history lesson, determine if you want to cover this material in one or two class periods. The lesson focuses on Abraham Lincoln as a man and as a leader during the Civil War. The reading paragraphs have pictures and Word Banks to help students grasp the main ideas of the lesson. This lesson covers more advanced vocabulary than beginners will know, but it is not critical that the students produce every new word. The goal is to engage the students in the topic and help them learn the general knowledge included in the test items. For example, in the paragraph on the Lincoln Memorial, the students do not need to retain the information about the construction and historical use of the memorial. These details are introduced in order to demonstrate that even years after his death, Americans still honor Lincoln’s leadership in significant ways. Covers civics test items 60, 72, 74, 75, and 100.

Subject:
Language Education (ESL)
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
Provider Set:
Beginning Level Lesson Plans
Date Added:
09/04/2015
Alexis de Tocqueville on the Tyranny of the Majority
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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"Democracy in America" by Alexis de Tocqueville is one of the most influential books ever written about America. While historians have viewed "Democracy" as a rich source about the age of Andrew Jackson, Tocqueville was more of a political thinker than a historian. His "new political science" offers insights into the problematic issues faced by democratic society.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
09/06/2019
American Government 3e
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
3.4 stars

American Government is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the single-semester American government course. This title includes innovative features designed to enhance student learning, including Insider Perspective features and a Get Connected Module that shows students how they can get engaged in the political process. The book provides an important opportunity for students to learn the core concepts of American government and understand how those concepts apply to their lives and the world around them. American Government includes updated information on the 2016 presidential election.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Author:
Glen Krutz
Sylvie Waskiewicz
Date Added:
08/23/2017
American Symbols
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This resource was created by Sara Pittack, in collaboration with Lynn Bowder, as part of ESU2's Mastering the Arts project. This project is a four year initiative focused on integrating arts into the core curriculum through teacher education and experiential learning.

Subject:
Visual Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Arts ESU2
Date Added:
11/01/2021
Benjamin Franklin and the U.S. Constitution - Beginning Level
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This lesson on Benjamin Franklin and the U.S. Constitution covers Civics Test items from two sections: Principles of American Democracy and Colonial Period and Independence. It briefly introduces the branches of government, a topic which will be covered in more detail in separate lessons. We would recommend teaching the lessons on George Washington and Thomas Jefferson before introducing this lesson. The readings and pictures should help students understand the new concepts. As with previous lessons, the goal for the students is to comprehend and answer the Civics Test items correctly. Coveris civics test items 1, 2, 3, 12, 13, 14, 65, 66, 67, and 68.

Subject:
Language Education (ESL)
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
Provider Set:
Beginning Level Lesson Plans
Date Added:
09/04/2015
Bill of Rights and Other Amendments - Beginning Level
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This lesson explains the concept of amendments and the background of the Bill of Rights in relation to the Constitution. We recommend teaching the lesson on Benjamin Franklin and the U.S. Constitution prior to this one. This lesson covers details about the First Amendment and voting rights. Covers civics test items 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 48, 50, 51, 54, and 66.

Subject:
Language Education (ESL)
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
Provider Set:
Beginning Level Lesson Plans
Date Added:
09/04/2015
Building Democracy for All: Interactive Explorations of Government and Civic Life
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Designed as a core or supplementary text for upper elementary, middle and high school teachers and students, Building Democracy for All offers instructional ideas, interactive resources, multicultural content, and multimodal learning materials for interest-building explorations of United States government as well as students’ roles as citizens in a democratic society. It focuses on the importance of community engagement and social responsibility as understood and acted upon by middle and high school students—core themes in the 2018 Massachusetts 8th Grade Curriculum Framework, and which are found in many state history and social studies curriculum frameworks around the country.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Date Added:
03/30/2020
C3 Civics Test Inquiry
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This inquiry leads students through an investigation of the civics test, a current graduation requirement for Kentucky students, in order to consider the ways in which the test addresses needed knowledge and skills to prepare students for active engagement in civic life. The compelling question for the inquiry—can the civics test make you a good citizen?—frames students’ assessment of the civics test in consideration of what it means to be a “good citizen,” a purpose of the Kentucky civics test, as well as national initiatives to have similar civics test in all states, notably by the Joe Foss Institute.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Module
Unit of Study
Provider:
Kentucky C3
Date Added:
01/02/2020
Chronicling and Picturing America
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Created through a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress, Chronicling America offers visitors the ability to search and view newspaper pages from 1690-1963 and to find information about American newspapers published between 1690"“present using the National Digital Newspaper Program.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
History
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
09/06/2019
The Citizenship Complex: Why the Vote Matters in the Race for Freedom and Equality for All
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Educational Use
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Not all people are born equal or free but there is an expectation of both when you are a citizen of the United States. Our struggles to earn the base level of representation are quickly forgotten as we look for another group to demonize. In my unit we will discover why George Washington was ahead of his time with his warning about "factions" and how their existence makes freedom and equality harder to bridge. As we trek through time highlighting issues such as the abolition of slavery, support for women's suffrage, and the challenges that face Asian and LGBTQIA communities my hope is that student understand the sacrifices made to be accepted and to earn the right to vote but more importantly the difficulty in being welcomed into American society.

The “Citizenship Complex” is the process by which groups gain full inclusion. To understand it, one must look to the intersection of law, citizenship and the Constitution. The unit aims to provide a more complex history of our nation, to tell a more earnest story of how the American identity became a mosaic of human struggle, and to offer a more robust and enlightening study of these issues so that as students recognize the power of citizenship they will take a more hopeful view of what our nation will look like in the future. By engaging in the sophisticated discussions of the past, identifying why some groups supported each other and scapegoated others, and learning about the importance of supporting efforts at inclusion, our students should become more informed, open-minded, and ready for the globalized world of the 21 st Century.

The unit will focus on four groups that have experienced the “Citizenship Complex”: African-American slaves, women, Asian immigrants, and the LGBTQIA community. By comparing these groups over time, we will really be able to unearth the cycles behind the Citizenship Complex and understand that American citizenship means at different times in our country’s history.

Subject:
U.S. History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume III
Date Added:
08/01/2016
Citizenship and Identity through the Lens of a Presidential Campaign
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Educational Use
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The unit will teach elements of civics and democracy through the lens of the Presidential election. Students will be asked to research, read, and write about various aspects of civics and democracy, using a wide array of multimedia resources that will include (but not be limited to) literature, music, visual arts, and technology. The goal of the unit is to help students understand the importance of voting and participation while building their knowledge of the election system. The unit will encourage your students to think about government in a new way and connect this remarkable election to their day to day lives. While this unit will be taught during the first marking period, the unit will work at any point throughout the next few years. It is a Social Studies based unit designed for middle school students, primarily in the sixth grade, but can be modified and adapted to fit high school curriculum, grades nine through twelve.

Subject:
English Language Arts
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume III
Date Added:
08/01/2016
Citizenship and its Ability to Change Lives
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Educational Use
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This curriculum unit focuses on children as citizens, and how they can claim ownership of their citizenship. Overall the unit works its way through the rights that children have as citizens and how they can use them to their advantage. It starts with what it means to them to be citizens, two specific rights that they have, and finally how they will use those rights to better their lives. The two rights that we discuss in this unit are education and voting. Those rights are the focus of this unit because I believe that they are the most important to young children and that they will benefit them the most in the long term. Education will provide the foundation for all of their learning throughout their lives, and voting is something that education prepares them for and will later in life affect their community and potentially the nation. I also believe that having an understanding of how voting actually impacts this country could potentially interest them in being active politically in the future.

Subject:
U.S. History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume III
Date Added:
08/01/2016
Civic Online Reasoning
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
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From June 2018 to May 2019, we administered an assessment to 3,446 students, a national sample that matches the demographic profile of high school students in the United States. The six exercises in our assessment gauged students’ ability to evaluate digital sources on the open internet. The results—if they can be summarized in a word—are troubling: •Fifty-two percent of students believed a grainy video claiming to show ballot stuffing in the 2016 Democratic primaries (the video was actually shot in Russia) constituted “strong evidence” of voter fraud in the U.S. Among more than 3,000 responses, only three students tracked down the source of the video, even though a quick search turns up a variety of articles exposing the ruse. Two-thirds of students couldn’t tell the difference between news stories and ads (set off by the words “Sponsored Content”) on Slate’s homepage.Ninety-six percent of students did not consider why ties between a climate change website and the fossil fuel industry might lessen that website’s credibility. Instead of investigating who was behind the site, students focused on superficial markers of credibility: the site’s aesthetics, its top-level domain, or how it portrayed itself on the About page.

Subject:
U.S. History
World History
Political Science
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Amit
Date Added:
06/29/2021
Civics
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Civics is the study of our national government, constitution, and the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Topics include democracy and other forms of government; legislative, executive, and judicial functions; the political process; and foreign and domestic policies. It also includes a summary of Washington State History and local native sovereignty.

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Date Added:
10/23/2017
Civics Course Resources
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

In Washington, a stand-alone high school civics course is required by a new state law.

A statewide sub-committee of OSPI's Social Studies Cadre and Walter Parker, Professor of Social Studies Education, University of Washington, drafted this list of resources in hopes that it will be useful to schools needing to create such a course or update an existing course. It is a work-in-progress.

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Barbara Soots
Walter Parker
Jerry Price
Jerry Price
Washington OSPI OER Project
Date Added:
01/02/2020
Civics, Foundations of Government
Rating
0.0 stars

Social Studies Targets:Forms of governmentNature/Purposes of governmentIdeologies of governmentComparative governmentEconomic systems and governmentLearning Targets:Understand how the world is organized politically and nations interact (civics)Identify the differences in philosophy, structure, and the nature of different types of government (civics)Understand the role of sovereignty in the development of different governments and within governments (civics)Compare and contrast democracies with other forms of government.(civics)Understand individual rights and their accompanying responsibilities including problem solving and decision making at the local, state, and international level. (civics)Understand how cultural forces and factors influenced and were influenced by changes in government (Cultural Geography)Identify ways that power can be distributed geographically within a state (Physical Geography)Identify the different types of economic systems (Economics)Understand how different government and economic systems influence one another (Economics)Students will recognize and analyze the ideologies inherent in different economic systems. (Economics)

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Civics, Foundations of Government, Key to John Locke from Youth Leadership Initiative
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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From: University of Virginia Center for PoliticsThe Key to John LockePurpose: The student will understand some of the basic theories of John Locke including limited government, unalienable rights, equal rights, and authority from consent of the governed.Objectives:Students will interpret the ideas of John Locke as they relate to limited government, unalienable rights, equal rights, and authority from the consent of the governed.Students will apply their interpretations of specific quotations from Locke to contemporary paintings by Norman Rockwell, The Problem We All Live With, by Dave Cutler, Flag With Male Symbol, and to a photograph from the 1989 revolt in Tiananmen Square.Key Words:consent of the governed natural rights treatise state of nature unalienable rights

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
10/23/2017