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  • Citizenship
African Americans Face and Fight Obstacles to Voting
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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In this lesson students learn about the Reconstruction Amendments (13th, 14th and 15th) that abolished slavery, guaranteed African American citizenship and secured men the right to vote.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
12/01/2016
American Me: My Story, Their Story and Our Story
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator Kenneth Porter for his Senior Leadership class. We all have different stories, reasons and various paths that we personally took or our relatives traversed to arrive at this nation of ours. This assignment tasks the student with researching the story of a relative/guardian who emigrated to this country. The student will learn the when, the what, the why and the how behind their story, in order to reveal to the student more about their own story.

Subject:
World Cultures
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Kathryn Shaughnessy
Date Added:
09/26/2019
Asian American & Pacific Islander Perspectives within Humanities Education
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Organized around the compelling question "How have Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders engaged civically and contributed to U.S. culture?" and grounded in inquiry-based teaching and learning, this lesson brings history, civics, and the arts together to learn about the experiences and perspectives of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) in U.S. history. Primary sources, literature, and works of art created by AAPI individuals and related organizations provide an historical as well as contemporary context for concepts and issues including civic participation, immigration, and culture.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
09/06/2019
CITOYEN.NE.S: Conversation en Français
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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CITOYEN.NE.S is a French language method for the conversation class at the intermediate/ advanced level. Content and activities are built around the concepts of diversity, inclusivity and equity, and engage students to practice French while questioning and participating in the world they live in – to be full citizens whatever their background, their race or their gender identity. As the French spelling of the title indicates, the book embraces écriture inclusive and uses it for instructions and general information for all students.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Portland State University
Author:
Anabelle Dolidon
Date Added:
11/18/2021
Remix
Citizens
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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A Project Based Learning Outline for Citizenship and Martin Luther King Jr. Day. To be used with Kindergarten, 1st or 2nd Grade, as fitted with standards.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Griselda Peters
Date Added:
08/08/2019
The Citizenship Complex: Why the Vote Matters in the Race for Freedom and Equality for All
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Not all people are born equal or free but there is an expectation of both when you are a citizen of the United States. Our struggles to earn the base level of representation are quickly forgotten as we look for another group to demonize. In my unit we will discover why George Washington was ahead of his time with his warning about "factions" and how their existence makes freedom and equality harder to bridge. As we trek through time highlighting issues such as the abolition of slavery, support for women's suffrage, and the challenges that face Asian and LGBTQIA communities my hope is that student understand the sacrifices made to be accepted and to earn the right to vote but more importantly the difficulty in being welcomed into American society.

The “Citizenship Complex” is the process by which groups gain full inclusion. To understand it, one must look to the intersection of law, citizenship and the Constitution. The unit aims to provide a more complex history of our nation, to tell a more earnest story of how the American identity became a mosaic of human struggle, and to offer a more robust and enlightening study of these issues so that as students recognize the power of citizenship they will take a more hopeful view of what our nation will look like in the future. By engaging in the sophisticated discussions of the past, identifying why some groups supported each other and scapegoated others, and learning about the importance of supporting efforts at inclusion, our students should become more informed, open-minded, and ready for the globalized world of the 21 st Century.

The unit will focus on four groups that have experienced the “Citizenship Complex”: African-American slaves, women, Asian immigrants, and the LGBTQIA community. By comparing these groups over time, we will really be able to unearth the cycles behind the Citizenship Complex and understand that American citizenship means at different times in our country’s history.

Subject:
U.S. History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume III
Date Added:
08/01/2016
Citizenship and Identity through the Lens of a Presidential Campaign
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Educational Use
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The unit will teach elements of civics and democracy through the lens of the Presidential election. Students will be asked to research, read, and write about various aspects of civics and democracy, using a wide array of multimedia resources that will include (but not be limited to) literature, music, visual arts, and technology. The goal of the unit is to help students understand the importance of voting and participation while building their knowledge of the election system. The unit will encourage your students to think about government in a new way and connect this remarkable election to their day to day lives. While this unit will be taught during the first marking period, the unit will work at any point throughout the next few years. It is a Social Studies based unit designed for middle school students, primarily in the sixth grade, but can be modified and adapted to fit high school curriculum, grades nine through twelve.

Subject:
English Language Arts
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume III
Date Added:
08/01/2016
Citizenship and its Ability to Change Lives
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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This curriculum unit focuses on children as citizens, and how they can claim ownership of their citizenship. Overall the unit works its way through the rights that children have as citizens and how they can use them to their advantage. It starts with what it means to them to be citizens, two specific rights that they have, and finally how they will use those rights to better their lives. The two rights that we discuss in this unit are education and voting. Those rights are the focus of this unit because I believe that they are the most important to young children and that they will benefit them the most in the long term. Education will provide the foundation for all of their learning throughout their lives, and voting is something that education prepares them for and will later in life affect their community and potentially the nation. I also believe that having an understanding of how voting actually impacts this country could potentially interest them in being active politically in the future.

Subject:
U.S. History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume III
Date Added:
08/01/2016
Civic Engagement
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CC BY-NC
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There will always be issues that we disagree with and would like to see changed, but we tend to minimize our role in society. How many times have you thought to yourself, “I’m only one person”? This seminar will explain the important role you play in government. You might not feel like you play an important role, but you do! The “dem” in “democracy” comes from the Greek word demos, meaning “people.” There are many ways that you can be actively engaged in your local, state, and federal government. In this seminar, you will learn about the rights and responsibilities you have as an American citizen and what you can do to help on a small and large scale.StandardsCC.8.6.9.-10.C--Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.5.2.9.C--Examine political leadership and public service in a republican form of government.5.2.9.D--Analyze citizens’ role in the political process toward the attainment of goals for individual and public good.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
01/02/2018
Civics
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Civics is the study of our national government, constitution, and the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Topics include democracy and other forms of government; legislative, executive, and judicial functions; the political process; and foreign and domestic policies. It also includes a summary of Washington State History and local native sovereignty.

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Date Added:
10/23/2017