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Data Citation
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Data citation is a key practice that supports the recognition of data creation as a primary research output rather than as a mere byproduct of research. Providing reliable access to research data should be a routine practice, similar to the practice of linking researchers to bibliographic references. After completing this lesson, participants should be able to define data citation and describe its benefits; to identify the roles of various actors in supporting data citation; to recognize common metadata elements and persistent data locators and describe the process for obtaining one, and to summarize best practices for supporting data citation.

Subject:
Information Science
Higher Education
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
DataONE Community Engagement & Outreach Working Group
Date Added:
11/21/2020
Data reuse and the open data citation advantage
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Background. Attribution to the original contributor upon reuse of published data is important both as a reward for data creators and to document the provenance of research findings. Previous studies have found that papers with publicly available datasets receive a higher number of citations than similar studies without available data. However, few previous analyses have had the statistical power to control for the many variables known to predict citation rate, which has led to uncertain estimates of the “citation benefit”. Furthermore, little is known about patterns in data reuse over time and across datasets. Method and Results. Here, we look at citation rates while controlling for many known citation predictors and investigate the variability of data reuse. In a multivariate regression on 10,555 studies that created gene expression microarray data, we found that studies that made data available in a public repository received 9% (95% confidence interval: 5% to 13%) more citations than similar studies for which the data was not made available. Date of publication, journal impact factor, open access status, number of authors, first and last author publication history, corresponding author country, institution citation history, and study topic were included as covariates. The citation benefit varied with date of dataset deposition: a citation benefit was most clear for papers published in 2004 and 2005, at about 30%. Authors published most papers using their own datasets within two years of their first publication on the dataset, whereas data reuse papers published by third-party investigators continued to accumulate for at least six years. To study patterns of data reuse directly, we compiled 9,724 instances of third party data reuse via mention of GEO or ArrayExpress accession numbers in the full text of papers. The level of third-party data use was high: for 100 datasets deposited in year 0, we estimated that 40 papers in PubMed reused a dataset by year 2, 100 by year 4, and more than 150 data reuse papers had been published by year 5. Data reuse was distributed across a broad base of datasets: a very conservative estimate found that 20% of the datasets deposited between 2003 and 2007 had been reused at least once by third parties. Conclusion. After accounting for other factors affecting citation rate, we find a robust citation benefit from open data, although a smaller one than previously reported. We conclude there is a direct effect of third-party data reuse that persists for years beyond the time when researchers have published most of the papers reusing their own data. Other factors that may also contribute to the citation benefit are considered. We further conclude that, at least for gene expression microarray data, a substantial fraction of archived datasets are reused, and that the intensity of dataset reuse has been steadily increasing since 2003.

Subject:
Information Science
Life Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
PeerJ
Author:
Heather A. Piwowar
Todd J. Vision
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Dealing with Plagiarism: A Guide for Teaching Assistants
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This interactive presentation helps teaching assistants understand what plagiarism is; why it occurs; and offers advice on how to detect, investigate, and report it when it does. Additional topics include special circumstances, plagiarism prevention, and legal information regarding plagiarism and plagiarists. The unit closes by sharing information about the weaknesses of current plagiarism technology and how one can use it more effectively.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Lecture
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Florida Institute of Technology
Provider Set:
BBST Testing Course
Author:
Cem Kaner
Rebecca Fiedler
Date Added:
04/25/2013
EndNote Desktop X7 for Windows PC Lesson 11 - 16 (zip files for Moodle)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

This is part 3 of a series of online exercises designed to demonstrate and allow students to practice what we consider the most useful, general functions of desktop EndNote for Windows. The online lessons and descriptive titles can be found in the Resources section, on the right side of your screen.Part 3 is concerned with using Cite While You Write (EndNote's plugin for Word) to place in-text citations into a Word document, change the referencing style to suit the student and build and edit the bibliography.Each lesson contains:general instructions describing what the student can expect to seespecific learning objectivesa main menu screen allowing them to choose between the demonstration and the practice exercisethe demonstration's duration timeThe demonstration part of each lesson:is narrated by the authoris not interactive includes text captionsThe practice part of each lesson:is not narrated contains more limited text prompts in place of detailed instructionsis interactiveThese lessons were created using Adobe Captivate 9 and published in HTML5 format, designed to be dropped into Moodle and used as HTML files. No grading or progress tracking is included in these lessons.They can be seen in action on KEATS (keats.kcl.ac.uk), the bespoke version of Moodle in use at King's College London. KEATS is not public, so please contact the authors for guest access or furher information regarding these lessons.

Subject:
Information Science
Higher Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
John Woodcock
Date Added:
02/28/2017
EndNote Desktop X7 for Windows PC Lessons 1 - 4 (Zip files for Moodle)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This is part 1 of a series of online exercises designed to demonstrate and allow students to practice what we consider the most useful, general functions of desktop EndNote for Windows. The online lessons and descriptive titles can be found in the Resources section, on the right side of your screen.Part 1 is focused on starting a new reference library and adding references from commonly used academic databases like OvidSP and CINAHL.Each lesson contains:general instructions describing what the student can expect to seespecific learning objectivesa main menu screen allowing them to choose between the demonstration and the practice exercisethe demonstration's duration timeThe demonstration part of each lesson:is narrated by the authoris not interactive includes text captionsThe practice part of each lesson:is not narrated contains more limited text prompts in place of detailed instructionsis interactiveThese lessons were created using Adobe Captivate 9 and published in HTML5 format, designed to be dropped into Moodle and used as HTML files. No grading or progress tracking is included in these lessons.They can be seen in action on KEATS (keats.kcl.ac.uk), the bespoke version of Moodle in use at King's College London. KEATS is not public, so please contact the authors for guest access or furher information regarding these lessons.

Subject:
Information Science
Higher Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
John Woodcock
Date Added:
02/28/2017
EndNote Desktop X7 for Windows PC Lessons 5 - 10 (zip files for Moodle)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This is part 2 of a series of online exercises designed to demonstrate and allow students to practice what we consider the most useful, general functions of desktop EndNote for Windows. The online lessons and descriptive titles can be found in the Resources section, on the right side of your screen.Part 2 is concerned with adding references that come from non-database sources such as books (from a library catalogue) and webpages, what to do if your references are missing information and how to have EndNote find and attach journal article PDFs to your references. Each lesson contains:general instructions describing what the student can expect to seespecific learning objectivesa main menu screen allowing them to choose between the demonstration and the practice exercisethe demonstration's duration timeThe demonstration part of each lesson:is narrated by the authoris not interactive includes text captionsThe practice part of each lesson:is not narrated contains more limited text prompts in place of detailed instructionsis interactiveThese lessons were created using Adobe Captivate 9 and published in HTML5 format, designed to be dropped into Moodle and used as HTML files. No grading or progress tracking is included in these lessons.They can be seen in action on KEATS (keats.kcl.ac.uk), the bespoke version of Moodle in use at King's College London. KEATS is not public, so please contact the authors for guest access or furher information regarding these lessons.

Subject:
Information Science
Higher Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
John Woodcock
Date Added:
02/28/2017
Pathway 2 Information: citing references
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The citing and referencing module is part of a wider online tutorial designed to teach a range of information skills to undergraduate students.

The module aims to provide an introductory guide to why referencing and citing is important and how to reference particular types of material according to different referencing styles. This skill is required by students throughout their degree courses and backs up more traditional face-to-face teaching in this area. The module uses an interactive approach, using activities to help students fully understand the concepts of referencing.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Date Added:
03/24/2017
Plagiarism and Academic Integrity
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
5.0 stars

This module is for lessons on plagiarism and academic integrity. International students learning in the U.S. tend to struggle both with the concept of plagiarism and the proper execution of citations and giving credit to their sources. Therefore, in INTO Mason's graduate transition courses, we spend one or two weeks on the concept of plagiarism and academic integrity with an Academic Integrity Research Paper as the assessment. Created by Steven Harris-Scott, Ph.D., and Amy Lewis, Ed.D., for INTO George Mason University with support from Mason 4-VA. Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

Subject:
Higher Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Steven Harris-Scott
Date Added:
03/16/2017
The Process of Research Writing
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
3.6 stars

The Process of Research Writing is a web-based research writing textbook (or is that textweb?) suitable for teachers and students in research oriented composition and rhetoric classes.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Steven D. Krause
Date Added:
11/03/2017
Research Skills
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

A research guide for college students that teaches them how to locate and use information resources. Learn how to start a research assignment, use reference sources, find books, find articles, avoid plagiarism, cite your sources, create an annotated bibliography, evaluate websites, find DVDs and audiobooks, find statistics, and get help.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Interactive
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Manchester Community College
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
09/25/2014
Using Sources
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This is a brief introduction for College-Level ESL students on how to use sources in their writing.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
CeAnn Myers
Date Added:
09/11/2019
h index: Tool for assessing productivity and impact of researchers
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
5.0 stars

The h-index (sometimes called the Hirsch index or Hirsch number) is one of the several research indices which is used to measure the productivity and impact of of a researcher/ research group/ institution. It’s an index which increases on the basis of citations and number of papers continuously with the passage of time. It is the major benchmark used by the employers for selection/recruitment and/ or assessment of Researchers.
This e-module will let you know all about the h index: What, How, Who, why......about h index will be answered here. In the very next video we will cover how to identify h index of a researcher in various platforms.
POWER POINT SLIDES OF THIS VIDEO are AVAILABLE ON SLIDESHARE: https://www.slideshare.net/semalty1/h-index-benchmark-of-productivity-and-impact-of-researcher
For any query please feel free to write to us at openknowledgeok@gmail.com and please do subscribe our channel.......THANKS FOR GIVING YOUR TIME.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Author:
Dr Ajay Semalty
Dr Mona Semalty H.N.B. Garhwal University Srinagar Garhwal India
Mr Lokesh Adhikari
Date Added:
11/19/2017