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Chromatography Lab
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To increase students' awareness of possible invisible pollutants in drinking water sources, students perform an exciting lab requiring them to think about how solutions and mixtures exist even in unsuspecting places such as ink. They use alcohol and chromatography paper to separate the components of black and colored marker ink. Students witness first-hand how components of a solution can be separated, even when those individual components are not visible in solution.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Barry Williams
Jessica Ray
Phyllis Balcerzak
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Chromatography: Who Wrote the Note?
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This lesson has students solving the mystery of a note by conducting chromatography. They will test different washable markers and see that different marker colors are made up of various pigments. They will compare and contrast the note chromatography with other chromatography results from a variety of markers.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Rebecca Hansing
Date Added:
08/16/2012
Chromotography: An Open Inquiry
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This is a laboratory investigation where students will use the scientific method to solve a new, experimental question in chromatography.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
cheryl winkler-miller
Date Added:
08/16/2012
DNA Forensics and Color Pigments
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Students perform DNA forensics using food coloring to enhance their understanding of DNA fingerprinting, restriction enzymes, genotyping and DNA gel electrophoresis. They place small drops of different food coloring ("water-based paint") on strips of filter paper and then place one paper strip end in water. As water travels along the paper strips, students observe the pigments that compose the paint decompose into their color components. This is an example of the chromatography concept applied to DNA forensics, with the pigments in the paint that define the color being analogous to DNA fragments of different lengths.

Subject:
Engineering
Life Science
Genetics
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mircea Ionescu
Myla Van Duyn
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Exploring Capillary Action
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Students observe multiple examples of capillary action. First they observe the shape of a glass-water meniscus and explain its shape in terms of the adhesive attraction of the water to the glass. Then they study capillary tubes and observe water climbing due to capillary action in the glass tubes. Finally, students experience a real-world application of capillary action by designing and using "capillary siphons" to filter water.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Chuan-Hua Chen
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Investigating Chromatography: Selecting Variables
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This activity is a classroom investigation where students separate pigment in dyes in order to learn about mixtures and solutions. They use chromatography to design and experiment with a single variable to answer a question about which ink will separate the most - has the greatest variety of pigment.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Nancy Gerber
Date Added:
08/16/2012
Investigating Chromatography: Separating Pigments
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This activity is a lab investigation where students design an experiment to extract pigments (AKA chromatography) from different colored, water soluble markers.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Sybil Haas
Date Added:
01/20/2012
Investigating Chromatography: Separating Pigments
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This activity is a lab investigation where students design an experiment to extract pigments (AKA chromatography) from different colored, water soluble markers.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Sybil Haas
Date Added:
01/20/2012
Investigating Compositions: Using Chromatography to Explain Color Patterns
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In this chemistry lab experiment, students explore the properties of color using chromatography. Students will observe and compare color patterns to differentiate compositions of various colors. Students gather data on color patterns and develop new experimental questions based on their data.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Suzanne Bot
Date Added:
08/16/2012
Ion-Exchange Chromatography
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We now know how to analyze pure compounds, but what if we have a mixture? Spectrophometry becomes quite complex when dealing with multiple species of compounds at once. In order to purify a compound we can separate if from a mixture based on its intrinsic chemical properties. Remember that fluorescein is negatively charged at a pH above pKa of the carboxyl group. We can take advantage of this fact and use its attraction to positive charges to separate it from other molecules. In ion-exchange chromatography, we will use a stationary phase with a positive charge, allowing negatively charged molecules to bind and positively charged species to flow through. We can then disrupt this interaction and retrieve our now-purified molecule, and use spectrophotometric analysis of our purified fractions to determine how well we were able to separate our molecules.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture Notes
Student Guide
Textbook
Author:
Cody Taylor
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Separation, Electroanalytical, And Spectrochemical Techniques
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This module consists of three interrelated subject areas; Separation Techniques and Chromatographic Techniques, Electro analytical Techniques and Spectroscopic Methods.

The module will be taught in six learning units reflecting common concepts and approaches.

Separation Techniques and Chromatographic Techniques unit will review elementary separation techniques that are usually taught in the school system, followed by a discussion of Chromatography Techniques these are covered by introducing the general chromatographic theory, followed by its application in different techniques of plane and column chromatographic techniques. Electro Analytical Techniques will introduce principles on which potentiometry is based, elaborate the common applications of potentiometry, this will be followed by voltammetry, starting with polarographic techniques ending with cyclic and anodic stripping voltammetry.

The unit on Spectroscopy and Atomic Spectroscopic Techniques will review concept of energy matter interaction, concepts of energy levels in atoms and molecules, and the unit will end with a discussion of atomic spectroscopic techniques.

Molecular Spectroscopy 1 will start with a discussion of the theory of UV-Visible spectroscopy, how it arises and how it is used in qualitative and quantitative analysis, instrumentation of the modern UV-visible spectrophotometer. The unit will end with a discussion of infrared spectroscopy starting with how the spectra arises, the different peaks exhibited by specific functional groups and how to apply IR in identification of functional groups and compounds.

Molecular Spectroscopy 2 will introduce nuclear magnetic resonance phenomenon, followed by a discussion of proton NMR, the relationship of chemical shift with the molecular chemical environment and how proton NMR used in identification of functional groups. The unit ends with a discussion of the carbon NMR and how it compliments proton NMR in analysis of compounds. The last learning unit will be Mass Spectrometry starting with how mass spectra arises, how it is used in identification of organic compounds ending with the Instrumentation for mass spectrometry.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
African Virtual University
Provider Set:
OER@AVU
Author:
Vincent Makokha
Date Added:
03/10/2018
Spotting Chromatography
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In this mini-lab students will use chromatography to compare the mobile phase and the stationary phases of different inks used in marking pens. They will also determine the polarity of the solvents and inks. Finally, the students will use their calculated information to solve a crime.

Subject:
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Date Added:
12/13/2011