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  • Cell Membrane
Active and Passive Transport: Red Rover Send Particles Over
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Students compare and contrast passive and active transport by playing a game to model this phenomenon. Movement through cell membranes is also modeled, as well as the structure and movement typical of the fluid mosaic model of the cell membrane. Concentration gradient, sizes, shapes and polarity of molecules determine the method of movement through cell membranes. This activity is associated with the Test your Mettle phase of the legacy cycle.

Subject:
Engineering
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Melinda M. Higgins
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Cell Membrane Color Sheet and Build a Cell Membrane
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Students color-code a schematic of a cell and its cell membrane structures. Then they complete the "Build-a-Membrane" activity found at http://learn.genetics.utah.edu. This reinforces their understanding of the structure and function of animal cells, and shows them the importance of being able to construct a tangible model of something that is otherwise difficult to see.

Subject:
Engineering
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Amber Spolarich
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Cell Membrane: Just Passing Through
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This interactive feature describes some of the most important structures and functions of the cell membrane.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
09/26/2003
Cell Membrane Structure and Function
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Students learn about the different structures that comprise cell membranes, fulfilling part of the Research and Revise stages of the legacy cycle. They view online animations of cell membrane dynamics (links provided). Then they observe three teacher demonstrations that illustrate diffusion and osmosis concepts, as well as the effect of movement through a semi-permeable membrane using Lugol's solution.

Subject:
Engineering
Biology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Amber Spolarich
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Cellular Structure (Plasma Membrane) and Function
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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In this seminar you will create images of the biologically important structures of the cell membrane. The pictures will be translated to function. You will practice the terminology of these structures to associate their importance in the function of the cell membrane. The inquiry lab will allow you to design a model of the limitations of cell growth due to the cell membrane using water balloons.StandardsBIO.A.2.2.3 Compare and contrast the structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids in organisms.BIO.A.4.2.1 Explain how organisms maintain homeostasis (e.g., thermoregulation, water regulation, oxygen regulation).BIO.A.4.1.3 Describe how endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and other membrane-bound cellular organelles facilitate transport of materials within cells.BIO.A.4.1.2 Compare and contrast the mechanisms that transport materials across the plasma membrane (i.e., passive transport -- diffusion, osmosis, facilitated diffusion; active transport -- pumps, endocytosis, exocytosis).BIO.A.4.1.1 Describe how the structure of the plasma membrane allows it to function as a regulatory structure and/or protective barrier for a cell.

Subject:
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Tracy Rains
Deanna Mayers
Date Added:
10/07/2017
Diffusion, Osmosis and Active Transport
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Movement of ions in and out of cells is crucial to maintaining homeostasis within the body and ensuring that biological functions run properly. The natural movement of molecules due to collisions is called diffusion. Several factors affect diffusion rate: concentration, surface area, and molecular pumps. This activity demonstrates diffusion, osmosis, and active transport through 12 interactive models.

Subject:
Life Science
Physics
Material Type:
Data Set
Lecture Notes
Simulation
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
01/13/2012
Eukaryotic Cells
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Eukaryotic cells are the foundation of our human body. They help us produce energy, grow, move, and carry out all our life functions. Looking at these cells, the learner will be challenged to explain how they help us grow and function. Eukaryotic cells are unique in the cellular world because they have membrane bound organelles. For this lesson experience, the learner will explore eukaryotic cell structure and function. Additionally they will travel through models of the cells, drawing comparisons with life functions at the micro and macro level.StandardsBIO.A.1.2.1 Compare cellular structures and their functions in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

Subject:
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Tracy Rains
Deanna Mayers
Date Added:
10/01/2017
Keepers of the Gate
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Through two lessons and five activities, students explore the structure and function of cell membranes. Specific transport functions, including active and passive transport, are presented. In the legacy cycle tradition, students are motivated with a Grand Challenge question. As they study the ingress and egress of particles through membranes, students learn about quantum dots and biotechnology through the concept of intracellular engineering.

Subject:
Engineering
Life Science
Biology
Chemistry
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Melinda M. Higgins
Date Added:
09/18/2014
The Keepers of the Gate Challenge
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Students are presented with a real-life problem as a challenge to investigate, research and solve. Specifically, they are asked to investigate why salt water helps a sore throat, and how engineers apply this understanding to solve other problems. Students read a medical journal article and listen to an audio talk by Dr. Z. L. Wang to learn more about quantum dots. After students reflect and respond to the challenge question, they conduct the associated activity to perform journaling and brainstorming.

Subject:
Engineering
Life Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Melinda Higgins
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Membrane Transport in Animal Cells
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

The real structure of cell membrane is so dynamic & it not only allows the cells to move but also has constant movement & fluidity. Therefore, an animation would be great for teaching the dynamic movement of phospholipids & proteins in cell membrane. This LO also helps students to understand the movement of material across the membrane. I prefer students watch it at least twice.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
maxwell sanei
Date Added:
03/03/2018
Problem Based Module: Cell Membrane Function and Dysfunction- A Key to Diseases
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

In this project, you will explore a real-world problem, and then work through a series of steps to analyze that problem, research ways the problem could be solved, then propose a possible solution to that problem. Often, there are no specific right or wrong solutions, but sometimes one particular solution may be better than others. The key is making sure you fully understand the problem, have researched some possible solutions, and have proposed the solution that you can support with information / evidence.Begin by reading the problem statement in Step 1. Take the time to review all the information provided in the statement, including exploring the websites, videos and / or articles that are linked. Then work on steps 2 through 8 to complete this problem-based learning experience.

Subject:
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Tracy Rains
Deanna Mayers
Date Added:
10/07/2017
Prokaryotic Cells
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

Cells are the fundamental unit of all living things; however, there are many different types of cells. Students often look at the world with a concrete, inflexible view, knowing only what they see with their eyes. Life is diverse and different, and you will be challenged as you investigate life that is different from you. For this experience, we focus on one of the two major divisions of cells called Prokaryotic Cells. These cells are considered primitive compared to the cells that make up humans. Learners will explore various types of prokaryotic cells and reflect on how they relate to their cell functions.StandardsBIO.A.1.2.1 Compare cellular structures and their functions in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

Subject:
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Tracy Rains
Deanna Mayers
Date Added:
10/01/2017
Quantum Dots and the Harkess Method
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Students explore the applications of quantum dots by researching a journal article and answering framing questions used in a classwide discussion. This "Harkness-method" discussion helps students become critical readers of scientific literature.

Subject:
Engineering
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Amber Spolarich
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Selectively Permeable Membranes
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Students learn that engineers develop different polymers to serve various functions and are introduced to selectively permeable membranes. In a warm-up activity, they construct models of selectively permeable membranes using common household materials, and are reminded about simple diffusion and passive transport. In the main activity, student pairs test and compare the selective permeability of everyday polymer materials engineered for food storage (including plastic grocery bags, zipper sandwich bags, and plastic wrap) with various in-solution molecules (iodine, corn starch, food coloring, marker dye), assess how the polymer’s permeability relates to its function/purpose, and compare that to the permeability of dialysis tubing (which simulates a cell membrane).

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Eric Shows
Date Added:
02/03/2017