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19th Century Immigration - Causes & Effects
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Students will examine and interpret a population chart published in 1898 — depicting changes in the makeup of the United States across time in three categories, “foreign stock,” “native stock,” and “colored” — as well as an 1893 political cartoon about immigration. Students will also explain the causes and effects of population change in the late 19th century.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
10/18/2019
8.3 Forces at a Distance - Unit Overview
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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This unit launches with a slow-motion video of a speaker as it plays music. In the previous unit, students developed a model of sound. This unit allows students to investigate the cause of a speaker’s vibration in addition to the effect.

Students dissect speakers to explore the inner workings, and engineer homemade cup speakers to manipulate the parts of the speaker. They identify that most speakers have the same parts–a magnet, a coil of wire, and a membrane. Students investigate each of these parts to figure out how they work together in the speaker system. Along the way, students manipulate the components (e.g. changing the strength of the magnet, number of coils, direction of current) to see how this technology can be modified and applied to a variety of contexts, like MagLev trains, junkyard magnets, and electric motors.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
OpenSciEd
Date Added:
02/26/2020
Remix
Analyzing Findings
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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By the end of this section, you will be able to:Explain what a correlation coefficient tells us about the relationship between variablesRecognize that correlation does not indicate a cause-and-effect relationship between variablesDiscuss our tendency to look for relationships between variables that do not really existExplain random sampling and assignment of participants into experimental and control groupsDiscuss how experimenter or participant bias could affect the results of an experimentIdentify independent and dependent variables

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Melinda Boland
Date Added:
01/12/2018
Educational Attainment and Marriage Age - Testing a Correlation Coefficient's Significance
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Students will develop, justify, and evaluate conjectures about the relationship between two quantitative variables over time in the United States: the median age (in years) when women first marry and the percentage of women aged 25–34 with a bachelor’s degree or higher. Students will write a regression equation for the data, interpret in context the linear model’s slope and y-intercept, and find the correlation coefficient (r), assessing the strength of the linear relationship and whether a significant relationship exists between the variables. Students will then summarize their conclusions and consider whether correlation implies causation.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
10/15/2019
Math, Grade 7
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Four full-year digital course, built from the ground up and fully-aligned to the Common Core State Standards, for 7th grade Mathematics. Created using research-based approaches to teaching and learning, the Open Access Common Core Course for Mathematics is designed with student-centered learning in mind, including activities for students to develop valuable 21st century skills and academic mindset.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
Math, Grade 7, Samples and Probability
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Samples and ProbabilityType of Unit: ConceptualPrior KnowledgeStudents should be able to:Understand the concept of a ratio.Write ratios as percents.Describe data using measures of center.Display and interpret data in dot plots, histograms, and box plots.Lesson FlowStudents begin to think about probability by considering the relative likelihood of familiar events on the continuum between impossible and certain. Students begin to formalize this understanding of probability. They are introduced to the concept of probability as a measure of likelihood, and how to calculate probability of equally likely events using a ratio. The terms (impossible, certain, etc.) are given numerical values. Next, students compare expected results to actual results by calculating the probability of an event and conducting an experiment. Students explore the probability of outcomes that are not equally likely. They collect data to estimate the experimental probabilities. They use ratio and proportion to predict results for a large number of trials. Students learn about compound events. They use tree diagrams, tables, and systematic lists as tools to find the sample space. They determine the theoretical probability of first independent, and then dependent events. In Lesson 10 students identify a question to investigate for a unit project and submit a proposal. They then complete a Self Check. In Lesson 11, students review the results of the Self Check, solve a related problem, and take a Quiz.Students are introduced to the concept of sampling as a method of determining characteristics of a population. They consider how a sample can be random or biased, and think about methods for randomly sampling a population to ensure that it is representative. In Lesson 13, students collect and analyze data for their unit project. Students begin to apply their knowledge of statistics learned in sixth grade. They determine the typical class score from a sample of the population, and reason about the representativeness of the sample. Then, students begin to develop intuition about appropriate sample size by conducting an experiment. They compare different sample sizes, and decide whether increasing the sample size improves the results. In Lesson 16 and Lesson 17, students compare two data sets using any tools they wish. Students will be reminded of Mean Average Deviation (MAD), which will be a useful tool in this situation. Students complete another Self Check, review the results of their Self Check, and solve additional problems. The unit ends with three days for students to work on Gallery problems, possibly using one of the days to complete their project or get help on their project if needed, two days for students to present their unit projects to the class, and one day for the End of Unit Assessment.

Subject:
Mathematics
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
Math, Grade 7, Samples and Probability, Comparing Theoretical & Experimental Probability
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Students extend their understanding of compound events. They will compare experimental results to predicted results by calculating the probability of an event, then conducting an experiment.Key ConceptsStudents apply their understanding of compound events to actual experiments.Students will see there is variability in actual results.Goals and Learning ObjectivesContinue to explore compound independent events.Compare theoretical probability to experimental probability.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Math, Grade 7, Samples and Probability, Compound Events & Sample Spaces
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Students begin learning about compound events by considering independent events. They will consider everyday objects with known probabilities. Students will represent sample spaces using lists, tables, and tree diagrams in order to calculate the probability of certain events.Key ConceptsCompound events are introduced in this lesson, building upon what students have learned about determining sample space and probabilities of single events.Terms introduced are:multistage experiment: an experiment in which more than one action is performedcompound events: the combined results of multistage experimentsindependent events: compound events in which the outcome of one does not affect the outcome of the otherGoals and Learning ObjectivesLearn about compound events and sample spaces.Use different tools to find the sample space (tree diagrams, tables, lists) of a compound event.Use ratio and proportion to solve problems.SWD: Go over the mathematical language used throughout the module. Make sure students use that language when discussing problems in this lesson.

Subject:
Mathematics
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Math, Grade 7, Samples and Probability, Fundamental Counting Principle
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Students will continue to apply their understanding of compound independent events. They will calculate probabilities and represent sample spaces with visual representations.Key ConceptsStudents continue to solve problems with compound events. The formula for calculating the probability of independent events is introduced:P(A and B) = P(A) ⋅ P(B)Goals and Learning ObjectivesDeepen understanding of compound events using lists, tables, and tree diagrams.Learn about the Fundamental Counting Principle.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Math, Grade 7, Samples and Probability, Independent & Dependent Compound Events
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Students continue to extend their understanding of compound events by comparing independent and dependent events. This includes drawing the sample space to understand how the first event does or does not affect the second event. Students will solve problems with dependent compound events.Key ConceptsStudents will learn about the differences between dependent and independent events.Events are independent if the outcome of an event does not influence the outcome of the others.Events are dependent if the outcome of an event does influence the outcome of the others.The difference can be observed by drawing a diagram to represent the sample space. For dependent events, the sample space is smaller.Goals and Learning ObjectivesUnderstand the difference between independent and dependent compound events.Draw diagrams for dependent compound events.Solve compound event problems.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Psychology
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Psychology is designed to meet scope and sequence requirements for the single-semester introduction to psychology course. The book offers a comprehensive treatment of core concepts, grounded in both classic studies and current and emerging research. The text also includes coverage of the DSM-5 in examinations of psychological disorders. Psychology incorporates discussions that reflect the diversity within the discipline, as well as the diversity of cultures and communities across the globe.Senior Contributing AuthorsRose M. Spielman, Formerly of Quinnipiac UniversityContributing AuthorsKathryn Dumper, Bainbridge State CollegeWilliam Jenkins, Mercer UniversityArlene Lacombe, Saint Joseph's UniversityMarilyn Lovett, Livingstone CollegeMarion Perlmutter, University of Michigan

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
02/14/2014
Psychology, Psychological Research, Analyzing Findings
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

By the end of this section, you will be able to:Explain what a correlation coefficient tells us about the relationship between variablesRecognize that correlation does not indicate a cause-and-effect relationship between variablesDiscuss our tendency to look for relationships between variables that do not really existExplain random sampling and assignment of participants into experimental and control groupsDiscuss how experimenter or participant bias could affect the results of an experimentIdentify independent and dependent variables

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
07/10/2017
Psychology, Psychological Research, Introduction
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This chapter covers:Why is Research Important?Approaches to ResearchAnalyzing FindingsEthicsFor more information, visit OpenStax College.

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
07/10/2017