Search Results (32)

View
Selected filters:
  • Brazil
The Amazon Rain Forest and Climate Change
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This module discusses global climate change that is occurring largely because of greenhouse gases emitted by human activities, and in particular the impact that tropical deforestation plays in the climate system. It also covers signs of climate change, the current thinking on future changes, and international agreements that are attempting to minimize the effects of climate change. The United Nations Collaborative Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries (UN-REDD Programme) is also discussed.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
COMET MetEd Collection
Author:
COMET
Date Added:
12/22/2009
CFR InfoGuide: Deforestation in the Amazon
Rating

The Council on Foreign Relation's (CFR) "Deforestation in the Amazon" InfoGuide provides a compelling look at the causes and consequences of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon and is available online in English and Portuguese. CFR InfoGuides are a multimedia series to promote understanding of complex foreign policy issues.

Subject:
World Cultures
Forestry and Agriculture
Physical Geography
Cultural Geography
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Case Study
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Module
Primary Source
Reading
Author:
Council on Foreign Relations
Date Added:
12/14/2017
ClicaBrasil
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

The Portuguese language lessons of ClicaBrasil highlight aspects of Brazilian culture. They are designed for intermediate to advanced students, but are accessible to everyone. Each lesson includes videos of Brazilians from all walks of life speaking naturally about their lives and their country. All lessons integrate reading, writing, listening and comprehension, grammar, vocabulary, oral communication and cultural activities with the videos. This is also available as a free PDF textbook and as print on demand.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
University of Texas at Austin
Provider Set:
COERLL
Author:
Flanzer, Vivian
Date Added:
01/17/2012
ClicaBrasil: Portuguese Language and Culture for Intermediate Students
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

ClicaBrasil was developed for intermediate level Portuguese language courses at UT-Austin. People all ove the world are now using it for different purposes: self-study, classroom instruction, tutoring, or as a pastime.The lessons in ClicaBrasil integrate reading, writing, listening and reading comprehension, grammar, vocabulary, oral communication, and cultural activities. Numerous video clips (157, to be precise!) that show different Brazilians speaking about their lives, their culture, and their country support and enhance these activities.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Texas at Austin
Provider Set:
COERLL
Author:
Vivian Flanzer
Date Added:
09/13/2019
Colonial Latin and South America
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the history of Latin and South America from the year in which European explorers first discovered and began to colonize the region to the early 19th century, when many Latin and South American colonies declared their independence from European rule. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout Latin and South America during this 400-year period. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the interaction between native peoples and European settlers created diverse and complex colonial societies throughout Latin and South America, and why the colonies of the region eventually declared their independence from European political control. Upon successful completion of this course, student will be able to: Think critically about the history of Latin and South America from the pre-colonial period though the beginning of the 19th century; Compare and contrast the political, economic, and social practices of the peoples of Iberia, Africa, and the Americas in the pre-colonial period; Analyze the political, social, and military interactions between Iberian explorers and conquerors and the indigenous peoples of the Americas in the 15th and 16th centuries; Identify how Spanish colonists settled Latin and South America in the 16th century and analyze the role played by imperial and religious institutions in colonization efforts; Assess the role of European Mercantile policies in the formation of colonial economies and trade networks; Analyze the structure of Spanish and Portuguese colonial societies and assess the role of women, indigenous peoples, and Afro-Latinos in these societies; Students will be able to assess the status of Latin and South American colonies in the Spanish and Portuguese Empires of the 17th and 18th centuries and identity how European conflicts affected political and economic life in the colonies; Identify how the Napoleonic Wars of the early 19th century led to the rise of independence movements in the colonies of Latin and South America; Assess how political revolutions and wars for independence throughout Latin and South America ended European colonial control of the region, and compare and contrast the consequences of these revolutions for ethnic European and indigenous populations; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the pre-colonial period though the beginning of the 19th century using historical research methods. (History 221)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Complications of Identity
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This video from Wide Angle tells the story of two identical twins, one of whom was classified as white and the other as black, highlighting the difficulty in defining race in Brazilian society.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
Teachers' Domain
Date Added:
08/22/2008
The Conquest of America, Spring 2004
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this course the conquest and colonization of the Americas is considered, with special attention to the struggles of native peoples in Guatemala, Canada, Brazil, Panama, and colonial New England. In two segments of the course-one devoted to the Jesuit missionization of the Huron in the 1630s, the other to struggles between the government of Panama and the Kuna between 1900 and 1925-students examine primary documents such as letters, reports, and court records, to draw their own conclusions. Attention focuses on how we know about and represent past eras and other peoples, as well as on the history of struggles between native Americans and Europeans.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Howe, James
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Conversa Brasileira
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

A compilation of video scenarios of people interacting with each other in Portuguese. Conversations include dialogs, questions, turn taking exchanges, clarifications, false starts, hugs, laughter, asides. The scenarios are enhanced by transcriptions, translations, content analysis, and notes and discussion blogs.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
University of Texas at Austin
Provider Set:
COERLL
Author:
Kelm, Orlando
Date Added:
01/17/2012
Early Globalizations: East Meets West (1200s-1600s)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the history of the world's major civilizations from medieval times to the early modern era. The student will learn about the pivotal political, economic, and social changes that took place in Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Europe during this period. By the end of the course, the student will understand how many different civilizations evolved from isolated societies into expansive, interconnected empires capable of exerting global influence. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: Think critically and analytically about world history in the medieval and early modern eras; Identify and describe the emergence, decline, and main features of the Byzantine Empire; Identify the origins and characteristics of the European medieval period and describe the rapidly changing forces at work in society, the economy, and religion during this time; Identify the origins of the Aztec and Inca civilizations and assess how these empires affected socio-economic development in the Americas; Identify the origins of the Tang and Song dynasties in China and assess the impact of these empires on Chinese government, society, religion, and economy during what scholars refer to as the 'golden age'; Identify the origins of the Mongol Empire, which dominated much of Asia in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Students will analyze the nature of this empire created by nomads; Identify the reasons for a changing balance in the world economy in the 1400s and analyze why Europe superseded Asia as the most dominant civilization on the globe; Assess how and why the European Age of Discovery had such a large impact on the New World, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia; Identify the origins and characteristics of the Renaissance and describe its impact on European civilization as a whole; Identify the origins of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in Europe and assess how this movement altered the social, political, and religious fabric of Europe; Identify the origins of colonial Brazil and New Spain. Students will also be able to assess the impact of Spanish and Portuguese colonization on the New World, Africa, and Europe; Identify the origins of the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires and assess the unique characteristics of these dynasties and their impact upon Asia and the world; Identify the origins of the Atlantic slave trade, assessing how this forced migration of peoples affected Africa, Africans, Europe, and the New World; Analyze and describe the Asian trading world, the Ming dynasty in China, the ĺÎĺĺĺŤwarring states,' and early modern eras in Japan; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the medieval period to the early modern era using historical research methods. (History 221)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Economics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
The Experience of the Foreign in 19th-Century U.S. Travel Literature
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This module considers strategies for teaching George Dunham's travel journal A Journey to Brazil in relation to other nineteenth-century U.S. travel narratives.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Connexions
Author:
Cory Ledoux
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Global Media Perspectives
Rating

This kit provides the materials and background information needed to engage students in a dynamic and constructive process of learning how global media perspectives differ based on country of production, media source, target audience, and political and social context. There are five lessons representing important issues and media documents from: Africa (news and documentary film clips about the food crisis), Latin America (editorial cartoons about immigration), Europe (news and documentary film clips about Islam and cultural identity), India (magazine covers about India's rise in the global economy), and Southeast Asia (websites concerning Islamic majorities and minorities).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
Journalism
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Author:
Sox Sperry
Date Added:
04/30/2013
Global Nomads Group: Science and Technology Curriculum (Year-Long Program)
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Road to Doha explores critical environmental issues through addressing the driving question “How do we, as youth, impact climate change in our communities?”

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Student Guide
Author:
Global Nomads Group (GNG)
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Introduction to Comparative Politics, Spring 2014
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the United States. The lessons drawn from these countries will prepare you to analyze other countries of your own choosing in the paper assignments. At the end of the course, you should be able to analyze political events around the world, drawing on the theoretical explanations provided in the class.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lawson, Chappell
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Introduction to Latin American Studies, Fall 2006
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Interdisciplinary introduction to contemporary Latin America, drawing on films, literature, popular press accounts, and scholarly research. Topics include: economic development, ethnic and racial identity, religion, revolution, democratization, transitional justice, the rule of law, and the changing roles of women. Country examples draw on a range of countries in the region, especially Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and Mexico.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lawson, Chappell
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Língua da Gente
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In Brazil, the term língua da gente (literally ‘language of the people’) refers to the way that people actually talk in everyday speech. And that, in essence, is the object behind this series. We hope to provide practical lessons that demonstrate how people really speak, and we do this by presenting brief, slice-of-life dialogs, which focus on some daily situation, scenario, or task that we encounter every day.

Each audio podcast, generally between 8-12 minutes, includes the presentation of a brief dialog, a line-by-line English translation, and more in-depth analysis of the pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and cultural content in the lesson. Discussion blogs also accompany each lesson, providing community interaction for comments and questions. In broad terms, the lessons are subdivided into three levels of difficulty: Beginning, Elementary, and Intermediate. Additionally we have a cultural show that covers current events and related social issues.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
University of Texas at Austin
Provider Set:
COERLL
Date Added:
01/17/2017