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Analyzing Arguments--Propaganda (Robbie Pock, Portland Community College)
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In this unit you will learn about the formal parts of an argument and how they work together. You will also learn about a common and not always honest way that people making arguments attempt to persuade their audiences, sometimes through manipulation.

This unit contains two lessons, a primary source reading, an information literacy activity, and a discussion activity.

This resource was created as part of a Developmental Reading course redesign project, with contributions from Theresa Love and David Pontious and support from an Open Oregon Educational Resources grant.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Amy Hofer
Robbie Pock
Date Added:
04/19/2016
Ancient Philosophy, Fall 2004
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This course will acquaint the student with some of the ancient Greek contributions to the Western philosophical and scientific tradition. We will examine a broad range of central philosophical themes concerning: nature, law, justice, knowledge, virtue, happiness, and death. There will be a strong emphasis on analyses of arguments found in the texts.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Haslanger, Sally
Date Added:
01/01/2004
The Argument Guide
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This site provides a field guide for the identification and critical evaluation of all kinds of arguments and commonly recurring types of problems or questions.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Student Guide
Provider:
Virginia Tech
Date Added:
03/09/2016
Critical Reasoning for Beginners
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Are you confident you can reason clearly? Are you able to convince others of your point of view? Are you able to give plausible reasons for believing what you believe? Do you sometimes read arguments in the newspapers, hear them on the television, or in the pub and wish you knew how to confidently evaluate them? In this six-part course, you will learn all about arguments, how to identify them, how to evaluate them, and how not to mistake bad arguments for good. Such skills are invaluable if you are concerned about the truth of your beliefs, and the cogency of your arguments.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Marianne Talbot
Date Added:
01/29/2010
English Language Arts, Grade 11
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The 11th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 11th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Students move from learning the class rituals and routines and genre features of argument writing in Unit 11.1 to learning about narrative and informational genres in Unit 11.2: The American Short Story. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers
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In this unit, students will take a look at the historical vision of the American Dream as put together by our Founding Fathers. They will be asked: How, if at all, has this dream changed? Is this dream your dream? First students will participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing for his or her vision of the American Dream, and then they will write an argument laying out and defending their personal view of what the American Dream should be.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate closely one of the documents that they feel expresses the American Dream.
Students participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing his or her vision of the American Dream.
Students write a paper, taking into consideration the different points of view in the documents read, answering the question “What is the American Dream now?”
Students write their own argument describing and defending their vision of what the American Dream should be.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What has been the historical vision of the American Dream?
What should the American Dream be? (What should we as individuals and as a nation aspire to?)
How would women, former slaves, and other disenfranchised groups living during the time these documents were written respond to them?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Project: Growing Up Digital
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In this unit, students will produce two major pieces of work.  The first piece is an argument essay that grapples with one of the core questions of the unit: who are we, and who have we become because of the ways we connect? Students will read, annotate, and discuss several texts together as they consider the issues surrounding this question, and they will also research and annotate independently as they search for more evidence and perspectives to help deepen their ideas.  They will also create a museum exhibit as part of a team.  The exhibit project will help students identify what's worth preserving about their unique place in history.

PROJECT UNITS

This project unit continues to meet the English Language Arts standards as it also utilizes the learning principles established by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills. It is designed to support deep content knowledge and perseverance through long-term project planning and implementation. In addition, it will help students to recognize, develop, and apply the planning, teamwork, communication, and presentation skills they will use while presenting a final product to their class and/or the greater community. This real-world project-based activity will give students an opportunity to apply the skills they have been learning all year and will guide them to develop the motivation, knowledge, and skills they need in order to be college and career ready.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students write an argument paper where they develop a claim about current culture as it has been influenced by digital connectivity.
Students participate in a group project to create a museum exhibit that captures a unique place, time, and relationship to technology. Students acknowledge the differing perspectives of each group member and use those perspectives to synthesize one cohesive visual argument together.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What does it mean to be digitally connected?
What are the implications of living in a world where everyone is digitally connected?
How does the availability of instant connectivity shape our relationships?
What does our Internet use reveal about people's needs as humans?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Project: Growing Up Digital, The Effect of Digital Connectivity, Research On Information & Interaction
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In this lesson, you will consider the ways that ubiquitous computing has changed how we interact with information and how it has changed how we think about knowledge. You'll also have an opportunity to research independently.In this lesson, students will consider the ways that ubiquitous computing has changed how we interact with information and how it has changed how we think about knowledge. They'll also have an opportunity to research independently.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 12
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The 12th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 12th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Language study is embedded in every 12th grade unit as students use annotation to closely review aspects of each text. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Satire and Wit
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Students will consider the different ways that humor can be used by a writer to criticize people, practices, and institutions that he or she thinks are in need of serious reform. Students will read satirists ranging from classical Rome to modern day to examine how wit can be used to make important points about culture.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students research an aspect of modern life that they would like to lampoon.
Students read from satirists across history to absorb the style and forms of humor and institutions satirized.
Students write their own satire, drawing on techniques of famous satirists to criticize their targets.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What is satire, and when is it too harsh?
How can humor and irony make you more persuasive?
What do you think is funny? How far would you go to satirize it?
Who gets more reaction—satirists or protestors?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Satire and Wit, Roots of Satire, Analyzing Cinematic Satire Elements
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In this lesson, students will watch part of a film or television show that uses high school stereotypes, and they’ll analyze various cinematic elements that fuel its satirical power.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Inquiry Project: Banned Books Week Debate
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This was my inquiry-based project that focused on forming arguments and gathering appropriate sources on the topic of banned/challenged books. This lesson plan includes the driving question, grabber, and culminating activity for assessment.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Olivia Gennaro
Date Added:
10/10/2016
Media Construction of Social Justice
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This kit explores how people in the United States have perceived social justice movements over the past 180 years and how the U.S. media have constructed that public perception.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Date Added:
07/12/2014
Portland Community College English Composition
Conditions of Use:
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Focuses on academic writing as a means of inquiry. Uses critical reading, discussion and the writing process to explore ideas, develop cultural awareness and formulate positions. Emphasizes development of a variety of strategies to present evidence in support of a thesis.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Syllabus
Provider:
Portland Community College
Date Added:
04/03/2017
Symbolic Logic
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An introduction to symbolic logic with an emphasis on formal logical languages and natural deduction systems of logical proof. Students learn how to translate reasoning into a symbolic logical language and how to prove arguments valid with the precision of mathematics using formal systems of proof.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Author:
Mark Storey
Paul Herrick
Date Added:
03/21/2017
What is the most responsible way to deal with electronic waste?
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The growing number of electronics that are becoming obsolete is staggering. The responsible disposal of these materials remains to be a highly debated topic and is one that does not have an easy answer. In this problem-based learning module, students will research this growing issue and provide them opportunities to determine what actions to take. Students will then take their findings and use their research data as evidence to support their position. Groups will create a finished product in the form of a speech, radio broadcast, presentation or persuasive essay to help solve this problem.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Date Added:
11/27/2017