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2a. "I Love Lucy"
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Lucy belonged to genus Australopithecus and the species afarensis, but she also belonged to the the hominid family (hominidae) to which humans belong. Although humans are of the family hominidae, we are not of Lucy's genus or species. We are Homo sapiens. How then, can Lucy be our ancient ancestor if we belong to a different genus and species? It's because humans and Lucy share a taxonomy up to the point of genus and species; there are many shared characteristics, but there are differences and these differences place humans in our own genus and species.

Subject:
Ancient History
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
Date Added:
12/05/2014
Caistor dig
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A skeleton, found in September 2009 at one of the most important, but least understood, Roman sites in Britain is puzzling experts from The University of Nottingham.

Dr Will Bowden from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham and leader of excavations at the buried town of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund in Norfolk and is interviewed in this video on site at the dig.

September 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Dr Will Bowden, Associate Professor of Roman Archaeology, Department of Archaeology

Dr Will Bowden's previous research activity includes work on the Samnite cemetery and 12th century abbey at San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), survey of the Basilica of the Forty Martyrs (Albania), and survey of the cathedral complex at Jerash (Jordan) (in collaboration with Prof. Beat Brenk (University of Rome, La Sapienza)). He has also worked extensively on the use of the past in constructing present identities in Greece and Albania.

Current Project activity includes work on the Caistor Roman Town project and the Butrint Project (Albania). The Butrint Project (Albania) is an interdisciplinary research project focused on the ancient and medieval town of Butrint on the coast of southern Albania. Involved with the project since its inception in 1994 Dr Will Bowden's current role within the project is concerned with the publication of the 1994-2003 excavations of the Triconch Palace (a major late Roman town-house) and the publication of the excavations of a Roman villa and early Christian church at the site of Diaporit, where he directed excavations from 2000-2004.

The Caistor St Edmund Roman Town project is a new research initiative focused on the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, which was established in the territory of the Iceni in the aftermath of the Boudican revolt of AD 60-61. Research here is intended to chart the effects of the town's foundation on its surrounding area and to examine the development and eventual decline of the settlement. The project is being developed in collaboration with South Norfolk Council and the Norfolk Archaeological Trust and one of its key aims is to use ongoing research to encourage wider recognition and public enjoyment of this important Roman site.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Will Bowden
Date Added:
03/21/2017
Caistor dig
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A skeleton, found in September 2009 at one of the most important, but least understood, Roman sites in Britain is puzzling experts from The University of Nottingham.

Dr Will Bowden from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham and leader of excavations at the buried town of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund in Norfolk and is interviewed in this video on site at the dig.

September 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Dr Will Bowden, Associate Professor of Roman Archaeology, Department of Archaeology

Dr Will Bowden's previous research activity includes work on the Samnite cemetery and 12th century abbey at San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), survey of the Basilica of the Forty Martyrs (Albania), and survey of the cathedral complex at Jerash (Jordan) (in collaboration with Prof. Beat Brenk (University of Rome, La Sapienza)). He has also worked extensively on the use of the past in constructing present identities in Greece and Albania.

Current Project activity includes work on the Caistor Roman Town project and the Butrint Project (Albania). The Butrint Project (Albania) is an interdisciplinary research project focused on the ancient and medieval town of Butrint on the coast of southern Albania. Involved with the project since its inception in 1994 Dr Will Bowden's current role within the project is concerned with the publication of the 1994-2003 excavations of the Triconch Palace (a major late Roman town-house) and the publication of the excavations of a Roman villa and early Christian church at the site of Diaporit, where he directed excavations from 2000-2004.

The Caistor St Edmund Roman Town project is a new research initiative focused on the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, which was established in the territory of the Iceni in the aftermath of the Boudican revolt of AD 60-61. Research here is intended to chart the effects of the town's foundation on its surrounding area and to examine the development and eventual decline of the settlement. The project is being developed in collaboration with South Norfolk Council and the Norfolk Archaeological Trust and one of its key aims is to use ongoing research to encourage wider recognition and public enjoyment of this important Roman site.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Will Bowden
Date Added:
03/22/2017
Genes and Geography
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Our early human ancestors began migrating across the globe tens of thousands of years ago. Some left behind archaeological evidence of their travels. But as you'll hear in this Science Update, another record of where we come from and where we've been might be found right in our DNA.

Subject:
Genetics
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
03/25/2007
Geologic Time, Fossils, and Archaeology: Content Knowledge for Teachers
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This article provides links to web sites about geologic time, fossils, and the archaeology and culture of the Arctic for elementary teachers.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears: An Online Magazine for K-5 Teachers
Author:
Jessica Fries-Gaither
Date Added:
10/17/2014
 The Global Water Challenge
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As global population grows, so does the demand for water. Yet less than one percent of the planet’s supply is potable, and estimates suggest that 40% of humanity will not have access to clean water by 2025. Explore the complex issues surrounding this precious resource in this episode of America Abroad.

America Abroad is an award-winning documentary radio program distributed by Public Radio International (PRI) and broadcast on public radio stations nationwide. Each month, we take an in-depth look at a critical issue in international affairs and U.S. foreign policy.

To learn more visit http://www.americaabroad.org

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
America Abroad
Date Added:
01/28/2016
The Hispano Ranchos of Northern New Mexico: Continuity and Change
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This site features the small subsistence farms, or ranchos, created by Hispanos, early Spanish settlers of New Mexico, during the 1800s in the mountain valleys of the Pecos and Mora rivers. Houses were built from the same adobe used to construct Indian pueblos and Spanish missions, with decorative details added based on architectural fashions brought to New Mexico after it became a U.S. territory in 1851. Irrigation ditches were dug and regulated by rules dating back centuries.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Provider Set:
Teaching with Historic Places (TwHP)
Date Added:
07/11/2003
Human Origins and Evolution, Spring 2006
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Examines the dynamic interrelations among physical and behavioral traits of humans, environment, and culture to provide an integrated framework for studying human biological evolution and modern diversity. Topics include issues in morphological evolution and adaptation; fossil and cultural evidence for human evolution from earliest times through the Pleistocene; evolution of tool use and social behavior; modern human variation and concepts of race. Includes study of stone artifacts and fossil specimens.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
MerrickHarry
Date Added:
01/01/2006
The Human Past: Introduction to Archaeology, Fall 2006
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Archaeology reconstructs ancient human activities and their environmental contexts. Drawing on case studies in contrasting environmental settings from the Near East and Mesoamerica, considers these activities and the forces that shaped them. In laboratory sessions students encounter various classes of archaeological data and analyze archaeological artifacts made from materials such as stone, bone, ceramics, glass, and metal. These analyses help reconstruct the past. This class introduces the multidisciplinary nature of archaeology, both in theory and practice. Lectures provide a comparative examination of the origins of agriculture and the rise of early civilizations in the ancient Near East and Mesoamerica. The laboratory sessions provide practical experience in aspects of archaeological field methods and analytical techniques including the examination of stone, ceramic, and metal artifacts and bone materials. Lab sessions have occasional problem sets which are completed outside of class.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Harry Merrick
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Inca Investigation
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This OLogy activity gives kids a chance to test their investigative skills while learning about daily life for the Incas. Inca Investigation begins with an introduction to archaeologist Craig Morris and the ancient Inca city that his team excavated in the Andes mountains. Detailed directions are given for how to play Inca Investigation, which includes tips to help them better examine evidence. Each time they correctly identify a place, they are awarded an Inca Chronicle. They have the option of reading the chronicles online or printing their collection of chronicles.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Interactive
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History
Date Added:
10/15/2014
Lascaux
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Take a virtual tour of the prehistoric caves at Lascaux, France. The discovery of Lascaux in 1940 opened a new page in the knowledge of prehistoric art and our origins. Monumental work, the cave continues to feed the imagination and move the new generations of the world. This website is intended to help understand the secrets of the artists who painted and engraved bestiary at Lascaux 19,000 years ago, and to present the current trends in scientific research on the painted caves.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
World Cultures
Archaeology
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
Ministry of Culture and Communication, France
Provider Set:
Art History
Date Added:
09/12/2012
Learning From the Polar Past: Virtual Bookshelf
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This article highlights children's literature about fossils, dinosaurs, archaeology, and paleontology for use in the elementary classroom.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears: An Online Magazine for K-5 Teachers
Author:
Kate Hastings
Date Added:
10/17/2014
Materials in Human Experience, Spring 2004
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Examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; powerful metals in the Inka empire; rubber processing in ancient Mexico. Explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. Subject complements 3.091. Enrollment may be limited.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lechtman, Heather
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Mummy's Curse
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Egyptian mummies have given us great insight into an important ancient culture. They've also inspired a number of horror stories. For example, it's said that anyone who dared enter a mummy's tomb would die a horrible, premature death. In this Science Update, you'll hear about a scientific investigation that tested this legend.

Subject:
World Cultures
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
03/04/2007
Ology: Archaeology
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This Ology website for kids focuses on Archaeology. It includes activities, things to make, quizzes, interviews with working scientists, and more to help kids learn about Archaeology.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History
Date Added:
07/04/2013
Painted Garden, Villa of Livia
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This art history video dicussion examines "Painted Garden, Villa of Livia", fresco, 30-20 B.C.E. (Museo Nazionale Romano, Palazzo Massimo, Rome). Plant species include: umbrella pine, oak, red fir, quince, pomegranate, myrtle, oleander, date palm, strawberry, laurel, viburnum, holm oak, boxwood, cypress, ivy, acanthus, rose, poppy, chrysanthemum, chamomile, fern, violet, and iris.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
11/16/2012
The Perseus Digital Library
Rating

Perseus is an evolving digital library, engineering interactions through time, space, and language. Our primary goal is to bring a wide range of source materials to as large an audience as possible. We anticipate that greater accessibility to the sources for the study of the humanities will strengthen the quality of questions, lead to new avenues of research, and connect more people through the connection of ideas.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Languages
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Composition and Rhetoric
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Tufts University
Date Added:
04/25/2013
The Perseus Digital Library
Rating

Perseus is an evolving digital library, engineering interactions through time, space, and language. Our primary goal is to bring a wide range of source materials to as large an audience as possible. We anticipate that greater accessibility to the sources for the study of the humanities will strengthen the quality of questions, lead to new avenues of research, and connect more people through the connection of ideas.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Languages
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Composition and Rhetoric
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Tufts University
Date Added:
05/08/2015