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Anteprima del volume "I BACINI CULTURALI E LA PROGETTAZIONE SOCIALE ORIENTATA ALL’HERITAGE-MAKING, TRA POLITICHE GIOVANILI, INNOVAZIONE SOCIALE, DIVERSITÀ CULTURALE"
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Anteprima del volume "I BACINI CULTURALI E LA PROGETTAZIONE SOCIALE ORIENTATA ALL’HERITAGE-MAKING, TRA POLITICHE GIOVANILI, INNOVAZIONE SOCIALE, DIVERSITÀ CULTURALE. Il framework del Progetto ABACUS – Attivazione dei Bacini Culturali Siciliani, alla luce della Convenzione Quadro del Consiglio d'Europa sul valore del Patrimonio culturale per la società"

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Computer Science
Environmental Science
Information Science
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Languages
Performing Arts
World Cultures
Management
Public Relations
Agriculture
Education
History
Law
Hydrology
Physical Geography
Social Science
Anthropology
Archaeology
Political Science
Psychology
Social Work
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Interactive
Primary Source
Simulation
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Textbook
Author:
ABACUS Project Activation of Cultural Basins
Date Added:
12/22/2020
Anthropology: World Archaeology Syllabus
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ANTH 150 World Archaeology
Introduction to archaeology and cultural change from the earliest times to the advent of state-level societies.

Course Description:
• When did we become fully modern humans?
• When (and why) did we stop being hunter-gatherers?
• When did inequality emerge?
• Why did some people decide to start living in cities?
• What led to the development of complex state-level
societies?
These are important questions about what it means to
be human that archaeologists address. In this course,
we’ll consider these topics while providing an
introduction to archaeology and the study of world
prehistory. The course provides an overview of human
prehistory from modern humans up to the
development of literate civilizations. The approach will
be problem oriented and comparative. We will
consider ancient cultures from around the world in
order to foster an appreciation for human cultural
diversity. Explaining why cultural developments
occurred is often hotly debated among archaeologists,
and different perspectives will be explored critically
throughout this course.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Dr. Alison Carter
Date Added:
03/15/2021
Caistor dig
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A skeleton, found in September 2009 at one of the most important, but least understood, Roman sites in Britain is puzzling experts from The University of Nottingham.

Dr Will Bowden from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham and leader of excavations at the buried town of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund in Norfolk and is interviewed in this video on site at the dig.

September 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Dr Will Bowden, Associate Professor of Roman Archaeology, Department of Archaeology

Dr Will Bowden's previous research activity includes work on the Samnite cemetery and 12th century abbey at San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), survey of the Basilica of the Forty Martyrs (Albania), and survey of the cathedral complex at Jerash (Jordan) (in collaboration with Prof. Beat Brenk (University of Rome, La Sapienza)). He has also worked extensively on the use of the past in constructing present identities in Greece and Albania.

Current Project activity includes work on the Caistor Roman Town project and the Butrint Project (Albania). The Butrint Project (Albania) is an interdisciplinary research project focused on the ancient and medieval town of Butrint on the coast of southern Albania. Involved with the project since its inception in 1994 Dr Will Bowden's current role within the project is concerned with the publication of the 1994-2003 excavations of the Triconch Palace (a major late Roman town-house) and the publication of the excavations of a Roman villa and early Christian church at the site of Diaporit, where he directed excavations from 2000-2004.

The Caistor St Edmund Roman Town project is a new research initiative focused on the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, which was established in the territory of the Iceni in the aftermath of the Boudican revolt of AD 60-61. Research here is intended to chart the effects of the town's foundation on its surrounding area and to examine the development and eventual decline of the settlement. The project is being developed in collaboration with South Norfolk Council and the Norfolk Archaeological Trust and one of its key aims is to use ongoing research to encourage wider recognition and public enjoyment of this important Roman site.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Will Bowden
Date Added:
03/21/2017
Caistor dig
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A skeleton, found in September 2009 at one of the most important, but least understood, Roman sites in Britain is puzzling experts from The University of Nottingham.

Dr Will Bowden from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham and leader of excavations at the buried town of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund in Norfolk and is interviewed in this video on site at the dig.

September 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Dr Will Bowden, Associate Professor of Roman Archaeology, Department of Archaeology

Dr Will Bowden's previous research activity includes work on the Samnite cemetery and 12th century abbey at San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), survey of the Basilica of the Forty Martyrs (Albania), and survey of the cathedral complex at Jerash (Jordan) (in collaboration with Prof. Beat Brenk (University of Rome, La Sapienza)). He has also worked extensively on the use of the past in constructing present identities in Greece and Albania.

Current Project activity includes work on the Caistor Roman Town project and the Butrint Project (Albania). The Butrint Project (Albania) is an interdisciplinary research project focused on the ancient and medieval town of Butrint on the coast of southern Albania. Involved with the project since its inception in 1994 Dr Will Bowden's current role within the project is concerned with the publication of the 1994-2003 excavations of the Triconch Palace (a major late Roman town-house) and the publication of the excavations of a Roman villa and early Christian church at the site of Diaporit, where he directed excavations from 2000-2004.

The Caistor St Edmund Roman Town project is a new research initiative focused on the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, which was established in the territory of the Iceni in the aftermath of the Boudican revolt of AD 60-61. Research here is intended to chart the effects of the town's foundation on its surrounding area and to examine the development and eventual decline of the settlement. The project is being developed in collaboration with South Norfolk Council and the Norfolk Archaeological Trust and one of its key aims is to use ongoing research to encourage wider recognition and public enjoyment of this important Roman site.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Will Bowden
Date Added:
03/22/2017
Ceramic Mending Activity
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Mending is an important part of archaeology, as it can be used to establish relationships between different parts of an archaeological site. This resource is a tutorial detailing how to perform a ceramic mending activity with your students. Use it to support Maryland Math Standard 7.G.B.4-6 for grade 7 by focusing on the mending of round ceramics and determining their circumference or diameter from pieces. If you evaluate this resource or use it, please consider responding to this short (4 question) survey bit.ly/3rw0WQY

Subject:
Art History
Geometry
Social Science
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/02/2021
Ciència oberta i arqueologia
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Aproximació general a la definició de ciència oberta i als seus pilars bàsics i presentacio  de les principals institucions i/o plataformes digitals relacionades amb la ciència oberta i l’arqueologia a nivell internacional, europeu i català.

Subject:
Information Science
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson
Reading
Author:
Laura Tomàs Valldepérez
Date Added:
12/12/2020
Conserving Waterlogged Wood
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This video resource is presented as a real-world application of chemistry in the field of conservation archaeology. Conservator, Francis Lukezic, walks through the conservation practices for waterlogged archaeological wood and explains the chemical and cellular processes at work. Use to support Maryland/NGSS for Grades 5, MS, and HS. For 5-PS1-1 and MS-PS1-1, have students watch or perform the paper clip demonstration and discuss how the hydrogen bonding of water allows this then is disrupted by the soap; have students develop diagrams explaining the phenomenon of surface tension on the molecular level. For HS-PS2-6, have students watch or perform the sponge demonstration and discuss how the molecular structure of the wood makes it vulnerable to becoming waterlogged then brainstorm materials that are more resilient to water and discuss the uses of the materials. For interdisciplinary connections to geography and history, have students research why Maryland archaeologists do or do not discover the materials brainstormed instead of wood. If you evaluate or use this resource, please respond to this short (4 question) survey bit.ly/3DhRumA

Subject:
Chemistry
Social Science
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/02/2021
Digging into Archaeology: A Brief OER Introduction to Archaeology with Activities
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This book is intended for use in a variety of introductory archaeology settings, such as in lectures and lab courses. This text can complement an existing traditional text or completely replace a standard text. It can be used for its activities or as a study resource. When we wrote this text, we designed the chapters to be brief, providing concise and to-the-point information. This book is not intended to replace lectures or direct instruction from an instructor; rather, it supports learning in a variety of settings and formats. The book can be printed in whole, read digitally, or used piecemeal in either format. However you use this text, we hope that you find it serves as an instructive learning tool and that you dig archaeology as much as we do!

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Amanda Walcott Paskey
AnnMarie Beasley Cisneros
Date Added:
11/18/2021
Experimental Archaeology
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Imagine trying to cut your hair without metal tools. How would you do it? Join JPPM's Educator Nate Salzman as he uses experimental archaeology to answer the question "How did Native Americans cut their hair before metal tools?" Use to support the Maryland Social Studies Framework for grades 3, 4, and High School. To support the grade 3 content topic "Cultural Change Over Time," have students compare the advantages/disadvantages of the results of this experiment and how they receive a hair cut; for grade 4 topic "Native Cultures," have students either hypothesize and research how Native American tribes who did not have access to shells may have cut their hair or respond to the prompt "why did European colonists use metal tools for cutting their hair while the Native Americans used shells? Would some hair styles be easier to cut with one type of tool than the other?"; finally for HS topic "Exploration, Colonization, and Global Interaction, have students respond to the prompt "with the introduction of metal tools, how might the role of 'barber' have changed within a Native American tribe? If you evaluate or use this resource, consider responding to this short (4 question) survey at bit.ly/3G6RxUa

Subject:
World Cultures
History
Anthropology
Archaeology
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/02/2021
Genes and Geography
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Our early human ancestors began migrating across the globe tens of thousands of years ago. Some left behind archaeological evidence of their travels. But as you'll hear in this Science Update, another record of where we come from and where we've been might be found right in our DNA.

Subject:
Genetics
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
03/25/2007
Geologic Time, Fossils, and Archaeology: Content Knowledge for Teachers
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This article provides links to web sites about geologic time, fossils, and the archaeology and culture of the Arctic for elementary teachers.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears: An Online Magazine for K-5 Teachers
Author:
Jessica Fries-Gaither
Date Added:
10/17/2014
 The Global Water Challenge
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As global population grows, so does the demand for water. Yet less than one percent of the planet’s supply is potable, and estimates suggest that 40% of humanity will not have access to clean water by 2025. Explore the complex issues surrounding this precious resource in this episode of America Abroad.

America Abroad is an award-winning documentary radio program distributed by Public Radio International (PRI) and broadcast on public radio stations nationwide. Each month, we take an in-depth look at a critical issue in international affairs and U.S. foreign policy.

To learn more visit http://www.americaabroad.org

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
America Abroad
Date Added:
01/28/2016
How to apply paper artifact labels
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Sara Rivers-Cofield, Curator of Federal Collections at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory, walks through applying acid-free paper labels to artifacts. This is an alternative to labelling artifacts with permanent archival ink, and the tutorial is appropriate for both students and professional education. The Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory (MAC Lab) standards and guidelines for preparing artifact collections and their associated records, both paper and digital, for permanent curation at the lab can be found at https://jefpat.maryland.gov/Documents/mac-lab/technical-update-no1-collections-and-conservation-standards.pdf

The MAC Lab is a state-of-the-art archaeological research, conservation, and curation facility located at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum, the State Museum of Archaeology. The MAC Lab serves as the primary repository for archaeological collections recovered from land-based and underwater projects conducted by state and federal agencies throughout Maryland.

This resource is part of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum’s open educational resources project to provide history, ecology, archaeology, and conservation resources related to our 560 acre public park. JPPM is a part of the Maryland Historical Trust under the Maryland Department of Planning.

Subject:
Applied Science
History
Social Science
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson
Module
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
11/17/2021
If You Find an Artifact...
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What should you do if you're lucky enough to find an artifact? In this resource, JPPM Educator Kenny walks you through a simple 4-step process for making sure your find gets taken care of. Use to support Maryland Social Studies Frameworks for Grades 2 and 3. For Grade 2 Content Topic "Civic Engagement" search OER Commons for the related resource "JPPM - Marv's Story". Read the story together then as a class discuss and explore students' ideas of citizenship by asking whether Marv was a good citizen and if she could have made a different decision while still being a good citizen then have students reflect further by creating short profiles of people they respect, writing what makes them good citizens. For Grade 3 Content Topic "Civic Virtue" do the same except before discussing Marv's story have some students list their responsibilities if they find an artifact while others list what they are technically free to do even if they find an artifact. Then as a class decide if Marv had even more responsibility to do something when artifacts were found on her farm. If you evaluate or use this resource, please respond to this short (4 question) survey at bit.ly/3Gb4ZX5

Subject:
History
Social Science
Archaeology
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/03/2021
Introduction to Archaeology: A Workbook
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Introduction to Archaeology: A Workbook, is designed to assist students in the Introduction to Archaeology course in the Anthropology department at the University of Texas Arlington. The course is part of the core curriculum. This workbook is designed to challenge the student and reinforce what is learned in the classroom lectures.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
University of Texas at Arlington
Provider Set:
Mavs Open Press
Author:
Ashley Lemke
Date Added:
02/08/2021
Introduction to Archaeology Course Docs
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Course readings and assignments for Introduction to Archaeology course. Readings are from the library ebook World Prehistory: a brief introduction by Brian Fagan and Nadia Durrani. Taylor and Francis 2016 9th ed. ISBN 9781315641133.

Course Description
Introduces archaeology as the anthropological study of humans in the past and the present through the examination of cultural materials and human remains. Considers archaeological theories and methods and ethical issues related to cultural resource management and excavation. Examines systems of power and social justice related to ancient societies and compares them wit h similar systems and issues in contemporary societies from an anthropological perspective. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.
Intended Outcomes for the course
Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

Use an understanding of archaeological methods and theories to evaluate artifacts and other data.
Describe the impact of human beings on the environment over time and in different ecological settings.
Discuss ethical issues related to cultural resource management and the excavation and study of human remains associated with indigenous societies from an anthropological perspective.
Examine systems of power and social justice related to ancient societies and compare them with similar systems of power and privilege in contemporary societies from an anthropological perspective.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Mary Courtis
Date Added:
03/04/2020
Itinerary of the Saint Mark's Horses
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The Horses of Saint Mark have a long itinerary through space and time. On this lesson, we will through the visualisation of their whole itinerary to make the students of their relation with powerful states on their whole history.

Subject:
Art History
Ancient History
Material Type:
Interactive
Simulation
Author:
Zafeirios Avgeris
Date Added:
01/13/2020
Lascaux
Read the Fine Print
Rating
3.5 stars

Take a virtual tour of the prehistoric caves at Lascaux, France. The discovery of Lascaux in 1940 opened a new page in the knowledge of prehistoric art and our origins. Monumental work, the cave continues to feed the imagination and move the new generations of the world. This website is intended to help understand the secrets of the artists who painted and engraved bestiary at Lascaux 19,000 years ago, and to present the current trends in scientific research on the painted caves.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
World Cultures
Archaeology
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
Ministry of Culture and Communication, France
Provider Set:
Art History
Date Added:
09/12/2012
Learning From the Polar Past: Virtual Bookshelf
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This article highlights children's literature about fossils, dinosaurs, archaeology, and paleontology for use in the elementary classroom.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears: An Online Magazine for K-5 Teachers
Author:
Kate Hastings
Date Added:
10/17/2014